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RAL'rORN 
REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. ^-^^ Me, >s 

TACKfe 




Book No 



Accession 



917.9461 0633 



349924 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM 3427— 5M — 2^39 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witin funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/disturnellsstranOOdist 



R. SCHAEZLEIN, 

Manufacturer of 




•4gilver6mith, -^gold and -^gilVcr -^^latcr. 



Badges done in Solid GolcJ and Silver. 
Knights Templar Jewels and Crosses in gold and silver. 
B. A. M. Lodge Jewels, Crowns, Coronets, &c., made to 

order. 
Masonic Lodge Jewels in solid silver and metal. 
Order Eastern Star Jewels in metal, heavy gilt. 
Odd Fellows' Jewels in silver and metal. 
A. 0. U. W. Badges, Jewels and Pins in gold, silver and 

metal. 

A. O. U. W., Degree of Honor, Badges and Presentation 

Charms in solid gold. 

0. C. F. Badges, Jewels and Pins. 

1. O. C. F. Badges, Jewels and Pins. 

P. O. S. of A. Gold Pins, Jewels, Urns, &c. 

G. A. R. Rank and Corps Badges and Stars in solid gold 

and metal. 
All kinds of Society Badges, Lodge Seals, Ballot Boxes, 

Etc. 

Repairing and Repiating of Swords a Specialty. 
13 to 19 TRINITY STREET, 

BTear Montgomery, Between Bnsh and Sutter. 



A. P. HOTALINC & CO. 

IMPORTERS I COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Offices and Warehouse, 

429 to 437 JACKSON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



■Jc ^ii, il*. -''^ ♦lA »'* /^ 

»•» ■»>» ■»!» t\\ «t\ 7i> [ i; 




i 


I 



THE BEST WHISKY 

-^' IN THE WORLD»<- 



< 



GOI.DEN STATE AND MINERS' 

MANUFACTCBB 

CASTING-S and MACUINEKY 

OF EV»BT DE8CBIPTI0N. 

Mining and Milling Machinery a Specialty. 

237 to 251 FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



THE 




OF THE 



Pacific Coast! 



J. GUNDLACH 

& CO. 

S, E. corner Market and Second Sts. 



SAN FBANCISCO. 



and Patentee of the Latest Improved Refining Apparatus, warranted to 
produce Spirits Free of Fusil. Patented November 29, 1880. Factory, 
933 First Street, between Howard and Folsom, San Francisco. 

All kinds of Copper- 
smith Work executed 
for Breweries, Distill- 
eries, Kitchen Utensils, 
Water Heaters, Force 
Pumps, Alcohol Appar- 
atus, Steam Engines, 
Etc., Etc. 




Pacific Saw Mf'g Co. 

17 and 19 FREMONT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A NEW WOOD SAW 



THE 



LATEST. 



&^S 



BEST. " 

The above illustration shows an AUTOMATIC SELF-STRAIN 
INQ WOOD SAW FRAME, The saw is strained by means of a Steel 
Spring secured to the wood-end pieces with Metal Bands. 
Price, complete with Pacific Saw Mf g Go's Extra Blade, set and 

filed, ready to work, each $1.60 

Price, complete with Pacific Saw Mf g Go's 2nd Quality Blade, set 

and filed, ready to work, each $1.25 

Price, complete with Imported Blade, set and filed, ready to work, 

each $1.00 

A IiIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE. 
AGENTS won 

C. B. PAUL'S CELEBRATED FILES. 

Saws of every description on hand or made to order. 



DR. JUSTIN GATES' 

Turkisli and Russian Steam 
BATHS. 

Electric and Chemical Baths. 

M Other MEDICATED VAPOR Um 

— WITH — 

Magnetic Shampooing and Manipulation 



SPECIAL APARTMENTS 

— FOR — 

LADIES AND FAMILIES 

liVith Best Female attendance. 



For Luxury and Medicinal Effect these Baths 
are not Surpassed. 

Entrance at Steam Bath Drug Store, 

722 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Near Washington Street, San Francisco. 

DR, JUSTIN GATES, Proprietor, 



STRANGERS 

Visiting this City are respectfully invited 
to examine our Establishment where can 
be seen the finest Stock of WATCHES, 
DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE and 
FRENCH CLOCKS on the Pacific Coast. 

We also manufacture and keep on 
hand a full Assortment of GOLD QUARTZ 
JEWELRY and other Articles peculiar to 
this Coast, which we are selling at LOWER 
PRICES than any other house in the City. 

EI^YISITORS INCUR NO OBLIGATION TO 

PURCHASE. 

LOUIS BRAYERMAN & CO., 

119 Montgomery Street, 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



DISTURN ELL'S 



Strangers' Guide 



San Francisco and Yicinity. 



A Complete and Reliable Book of Reference for 

Tourists and other Strangers visiting the 

Metropolis of the Pacific. 

4 



WITH A MAP. 



Showing the Distances to Diffkrbnt Points by Half-milb 
Circles from New City Hall. 



SAN FRANCISCO : 

W. C. DISTURNELL, PUBLISHER, 

63iH California Street. 

1883. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1883, 
By W. C. DI9TURNELL, 
In the Ofl&ce of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. 0. 



349924 






INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



PAOK 

Academy of Sciences ''"^ 

Alameda ^^ 

Alcatraz Island ^ 

American Legion of Honor '^^ 

Ancient Order of Foresters '^^ 

Ancient Order of United Workmen 76 

Angel Island ^ 

Art Association *^ 

Associations and Societies 74 

Asylums ^ 

Austrian Benevolent Society 76 

Banks and Bankers ^2 

Bar Association 76 

Baths ^ 

Bay and River Steamers 116 

Berkeley 1^^ 

Bemal Heights 1^1 

Black Point 131 

Bohemian Club 76 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society 76 

British Benevolent Society 77 

Buildings and Blocks 53 

Caledonian Club 77 

California Historical Society 77 

California Pioneers 87 

California State Geological Society 78 

California State Mining Bureau 48 

Cambrian Mutual Aid Society 78 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



Canadian Association 78 

Carriage Companies 65, 149 

Cemeteries 91 

Chamber of Commerce 78 

Chinese District 106 

Chinese Missions 74 

Churches 68. 

City and County Officers 15 

City Hall 31 

Clearing-house 63 

Cliff House 131 

Colleges and Private Schools 93 

Consuls 61 

County Jail 32 

Courts 17. 35, 47 

Custom-house 42 

Distances and Fares to Principal Towns in California 122 

Drives 103 

Dry-docks 61 

Electric Light Companies 68 

Express Companies 64 

Eureka Turn Verein 79 

Farallones 132 

Federal Officers 35 

Ferries and River Steamers 116, 144 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph 27 

Fire Department 24 

Fire Patrol • • • 30 

Fort Mason 45 

Fort Winfield Scott 45 

Free and Accepted Masons 79 

French Benevolent Society 80 

Gardens 1^^ 

Gas AVorks ' "^ 

German General Benevolent Society *> 

Golden Gate 133 

Golden Gate Park 100 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



Grain Exchange 66 

Grand Army of the Republic 80 

Hack and Cab Ordinance 97 

Halls 57 

Harbor Fortifications 43 

Health Department 23 

Historical Sketch of San Francisco 9 

Hospitals 91 

Hotels 95 

House of Correction 32 

Immigration Association of California 81 

Improved Order of Red Men 81 

Independent Order B'nai B'rith 81 

Independent Order Odd Fellows 81 

Independent Order of Chosen Friends 82 

Independent Order of Good Templars 82 

Independent Order of Red Men 82 

Industrial School 33 

Inventors' Institute of California 146 

Italian Benevolent Society 82 

Knights of Honor 82 

Knights of Pythias 82 

Ladies' Protection and Relief Society 83 

Land Offices 66 

Libraries 92 

Lighthouses and Fog Signals 46 

Ligue Is^ationale Francaise 83 

Little Sisters' Infant Shelter 83 

Mails., Departure of 41 

Manufacturing Industries ... 105 

Markets 98 

Masonic Order 79 

Mechanics' Institute 83 

Merchants' Exchange Association 84 

Military Companies 51 

Military Posts 43 

Mint U. S 42 



INDEX TO CONTEXTS. 



Mission Dolores 23^ 

Municipal Buildings 32 

Municipal Government 15 

Museums -tQQ 

National Guard of California 51 

Netherlands Benevolent Association 84 

Newspapers q^ 

Notaries Public 5q 

Oakland jgo 

Oakland Ferry Time-table I44 

Olympic Club 34 

Order of Chosen Friends 84 

Point Lobos 135 

Police Department 3q 

Portuguese Benevolent Society 85 

Post-ofi&ce 3y 

Potrero 135 

Presidio Reservation 4g 

Private Eesidences 104 

Produce Exchange gg 

Prominent Localities 131 

Public Buildings 52 

Public Gardens 102 

Public Officers .....*.'.'.'.* 15, 35, 48 

Public Parks and Squares lOO 

Public School Department 18 

Purchasers' Guide I47 

Race Courses IO3 

Railroad Agencies ( Eastern Lines) 113 

Railroads (California Lines) IO9 

Railroads (Street) II4 

Routes of Travel to Principal Towns and Summer 

Resorts I09 

Russian Hill 1^ 

Safe Deposit Companies 54 1 

San Francisco Microscopical Society 86 ' 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



San Francisco Turn Yerein 86 

San Quentin 142 

San Rafael 142 

Saucelito 143 

Scandinavian Society 86 

Schools 18, 93 

Sea-wall 60 

Seal Rocks 136 

Societies 74 

South San Francisco 136 

Spanish Mutual Benevolent Society 87 

St. Andrews Society 87 

State Officers 48 

Steamboat Lines 116 

Steamship Agencies 121 

Steamship Lines 118 

Stock Boards 65 

Street Railroads 114 

Surrounding Towns 138 

Swedish Society 87 

Swiss Mutual Benevolent Society 88 

Telegraph Hill 137 

Telegraph Offices 64 

Telephone Offices 64 

Territorial Pioneers 88 

Theatres 99 

United Ancient Order of Druids 88 

United States Officers 35 

Veterans' Home Association 88 

Wards and Election Precincts 34 

Water Works 67 

Yerba Buena or Goat Island 137 

Young Men's Christian Association 89 

Young Women's Christian Association 89 

Youths' Directory 89 



•*^Prudent Business Men-«" 



1 



Who desire the Greatest Value for their Money, will 

secnre this result by sending 

Orders for 



PRINTING 



PAPER RDUHCf/ BOOK BINDINC, 



BACONS COMPANY 



508 CLAY STREET, (• 

509 SANSOME STREET. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The Reputation acquired by this Office, through a career of 30 

years on this Coast, for Promptness and Skill in filling 

orders entrusted to them, is second to that of 

no other Establishment in America. 



STRANGERS' GUIDE 



TO 



SAN FRANCISCO AND YICINITY. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

The city of San Francisco is situated on the west shore 
of the bay from which it derives its name, in latitude 37" 
47' 35", longitude 122*' 26' 15 ". It occupies the terminal 
portion of a peninsula, extending in a north-westerly 
direction from the mainland, lashed on the westT>y the 
long, swelling billows of the Paciiic Ocean, and rippled on 
the east by the smooth waters of the bay. The city and 
county extend from bay to ocean, four and one-half 
miles in average width, and six and one-half miles in 
length. The harbor is a beautiful sheet of water, about 
forty-five miles in length and eight miles in average 
width, affording safe anchorage at all times. Its entrance, 
the far-famed Golden Gate, is a strait about five miles in 
length and two miles in average width. Vessels can enter 
"^ith ease and safety, and the depth of water is sufficient 
for the largest craft. Soon after the founding of the Mis- 
sion of San Diego by the Franciscan Friars, an expedi- 
tion, under the command of Cai^tain Portola, the first 
Governor of California, and Friar Juan Crespi, was dis- 
patched from that point for the purpose of establishing 
a mission on the bay of Monterey. Having by mistake 
passed the object of their search, they continued their 



10 GUIDE TO SAN FRAXCISCO AND VICIXITY. 



march in a northerly direction, and on the 7th of Novem- 
ber, 1769, discovered the bay of San Francisco. In 1775, a 
vessel called the San Carlos, commanded by Lieutenant 
Ayala, was dispatched from Monterey to ascertain if an 
entrance to the bay could be effected, and in August of 
that year passed through what is now called the Golden 
Gate. This is the first vessel of which we have any 
authentic record to cast anchor in the bay of San Fran- 
cisco, although it is claimed by some historians that the 
bay was entered by Sir Francis Drake, in 1579, during his 
voyage along the coast. The first permanent settlement 
of white men on the shores of the bay was made in June, 
1776, by an expedition from Monterey, under Friars Fran- 
cisco Palou and Benito Cambon, accompanied by several 
settlers with their families, and a detachment of soldiers, 
under the command of Don Jose Moraga, who established 
a military post at what is now known as the Presidio Res- 
ervation. In October following, the Mission Dolores was 
founded., and about this time, a few adobe buildings were 
erectecrnear the shore of the bay. and the settlement 
named Yerba Buena, after an aromatic herb of that name 
which grew in great abundance on the surrounding hills. 
The missionaries immediately entered upon their arduous 
labors with great zeal, and made preparations for the 
erection of a church, which was subsequently completed, 
and which still stands on what is now known as the cor- 
ner of Dolores and Sixteenth Streets. For many years 
the few inhabitants of this then remote quarter of the 
globe led a secluded life, the only means of communica- 
tion with the outside world being the occasional arrival 
of a trading vessel for a cargo of hides and tallow, or a 
whaling ship in search of wood and water. In 1822 Cal- 
ifornia became a Mexican territory, and from that time 
the commerce of the port gradually increased, hides, tal- 
low, and grain being the principal exports. In 1835 Wil- 
liam A. Richardson, an Englishman who had settled at 
Saucelito a few years previous, was appointed Captain of 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 11 

the Port. He removed to this side of the bay, and erected 
near the beach a primitive abode composed of a frame of 
posts covered with canvas. During the same year an 
election was held, in conformity with the laws of Mexico 
for the establishment and government of pueblos, and J. 
J. Estudillo chosen Alcalde. In June, 1836, Jacob P. 
Leese, an American who had been engaged in mercantile 
pursuits at Los Angeles, arrived for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a store. He obtained from the Alcalde a grant for 
a hundred-vara lot on what is now known as the south- 
west corner of Dupont and Clay Streets, and immediately 
erected a wooden building, which was the first structure 
worthy of being called a house built on the site of the 
future city. On the Pourth of July, Mr. Leese christened 
his new habitation by a ball and banquet, wliich was 
attended by all the prominent American and Mexican res- 
idents. A band of music enlivened the scene, flags ob- 
tained from the vessels in the harbor decorated the 
rooms, and two cannons from the Presidio were utilized 
to fire salutes during the day and evening. In 1838 Mr. 
Leese erected a large wooden building on what is now 
the corner of Montgomery and Commercial Streets, which 
he subsequently sold to the Hudson Bay Co. During 
the same year, Captain W. A. Richardson erected an 
adobe building on Dupont Street, between Clay and 
"Washington, and another adobe was built by Senora 
Briones on the north-east corner of Filbert and Powell 
Streets. On the 15th of April, 1838, Mrs. Leese gave birth 
to a daughter, which was the first child of white parentage 
born in Yerba Buena. The first survey of the town was 
made by Captain Juan Vioget, in 1839, covering the 
ground now included within the boundaries of Sacra- 
mento, Pacific, Montgomery, and Dupont Streets. In 
1844, the town, which then contained about fourteen 
houses and fifty or sixty inhabitants, began to attract 
the attention of adventurous Americans, and from that 
date the population increased more rapidly. The war 



12 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Willi Mexico broke out in 1846, and on the 8th of July 
of that year Captain Montgomery, of the U. S. sloop of 
war Portsmouth, took formal possession of the town, 
hoisting the stars and stripes on the plaza now known 
as Portsmouth Square; and soon after, Washington A. 
Bartlett, a lieutenant on the Portsmouth, was appointed 
Alcalde. Among the notable events of the year was the 
arrival, on the last day of July, of the ship Brooklyn, 
with upwards of two hundred emigrants, principally Mor- 
mons, under the leadership of Samuel Brannan. This 
vessel may be considered the vanguard of a fleet of ships 
which soon after commenced to arrive from all parts of 
the world, crowded with adventurous spirits seeking a 
fortune in the Golden West. On the 7th of January, 1847, 
Mr. Brannan issued the first number of the California 
Star. This was the second newspaper published in the 
territory, one called the Californian having been started 
at Monterey in August, 1846. On the 30th of January, 
an ordinance was issued by the Alcalde, directing that 
the name of the town be changed from Yerba Buena to 
San Francisco. Another important event of the year 1847 
was the arrival, on the 6th of [March, of the ship Thomas 
H. Perkins, from New York, with the first detachment of 
a regiment of volunteers, under the command of Col. J. 
D. Stevenson. At an election held on tlie 13th of Sep- 
tember, six prominent citizens were chosen as members 
of a council to assist the Alcalde in the administration of 
the government. The number of votes polled was about 
two hundred. They held their first meeting, and entered 
upon their duties, on the 16th of the same month. At 
the close of the year 1847 the town contained about eight 
hundred inhabitants, sixty of whom were children of 
proper age to attend school. The commerce of the port 
had also rapidly increased, the exports during the last 
quarter of the year amounting to about 853,000, and the 
imports somewhat less than that sum. Tlie discovery 
of gold, wliich began to attract the attention of the cit- 



GUroE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 13 



izens early in 1848, was the dawn of an era of prosper- 
ity which was to metamorphose the embryo nucleus 
into the beautiful city of the present. In the place of 
sand hills we now see massive, handsome, and impos- 
ing buildings and blocks, and the sandy plains have 
been transformed into gardens which diffuse fragrant 
odor from flowers in perpetual bloom. The incorpor- 
ation as a city was effected in May, 1850, and the con- 
solidation of the city and county governments, in July, 
1856. Its rapid growth to the city of magnificent pro- 
portions and commanding importance of to-day is a 
marvel of wonder and a rare instance of the giant possi- 
bilities of human energy and American enterprise. The 
population according to the census of 1880 was 233,956. It 
is the chief commercial metropolis and emporium of the 
Pacific coast, and with its vast natural resources, broad 
avenues of trade, and the commerce of the world knock- 
ing at its doors, its continued growth and prosperity is 
assured. The climate is mild and healthful, a very even 
temperature being maintained throughout the year. The 
city proper occupies the north-east portion of the penin- 
sula. From the top of Telegraph Hill, the extreme 
north-eastern point, a grand and picturesque view is ob- 
tained. Southward the city spreads out in a sea of build- 
ings, intersected with streets teeming with life and 
animation of business bustle and confusion, from which 
the eye wanders in relief to the surrounding scene of 
harbor, with numerous craft of steam and sail riding 
gracefully on its placid surface; islands standing out in 
bold relief; the romantic oak-shaded nooks and hamlets 
around the shores, overlooked by green-carpeted hills; 
the Golden Gate, through which the waters of the Pacific 
flood and ebb ; and still beyond, the vast expanse of ocean. 
It is regularly laid out, the streets crossing each other at 
right angles. Elegant and palatial residences, with tasti- 
ly laid-out grounds, adorn the city, and handsome and 
substantial structures grace the business thoroughfares. 



14 OriDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



In the suburbs are beautiful parks and gardens for pleas- 
ure resort, and points of interest to delight the eye of the 
sight-seeker. Golden Gate Park, the most prominent one, 
covers a large area of ground, beautifully laid out with 
walks, drives, and gardens, containing flowers and plants 
of every description and variety, trees and shubbery, hot- 
houses, conservatories, etc. A tine ocean view is obtained 
at the "Cliff," which is reached by an excellent drive. 
The numbers of seal to be seen on the rocks a short dis- 
tance from the shore form an object of attraction at this 
resort. The public buildings, notably the City Hall, 
Mint, Appraiser's Building, and Sub-Treasury Building, 
compare favorably with any in the larger cities of the 
Union. The public school system is a pride of the city, 
and is not to be excelled by any in the United States. 
There are also a large number of private schools and col- 
legiate institutions of high character. Churches of all 
denominations, creed, and sect are maintained, and secret, 
benevolent, and social societies of every order and nature 
have been organized. The public libraries will bear com- 
parison with any in the older cities. The Free Library, 
recently established, is a credit and ornament to the city. 
It has commodious rooms lighted with electric light, and 
promises, in number of volumes and completeness of ap- 
pointment, to rival any in the Union. A Chamber of 
Commerce and Board of Trade are established, and three 
Stock Exchanges, a Produce Exchange, and a Grain 
Exchange are among the institutions of the city. In 
manufacturing industry all the various branches are rep- 
resented. Iron and brass foundries, smelting works, 
woolen and flour mills, wire and cordage factories, glass- 
works, sugar refineries, canneries, ship-yards, etc. A 
network of street railroads afford cheap transit in every 
direction. Six of these are wire cable roads— a feature of 
the city, and a model mode oi public conveyance. Two 
gas companies supply the city with gas, and night is 
turned into day by the subtlety of electric fluid supplied 



GUIDE TO SAN FKAN'CISCO A>T) VICrSITY. 15 



by the Electric Light Company. Excellent water is dis- 
tributed throughout the city for domestic and city pur- 
poses by the Spring Valley ^'ater Company. Eapid 
communication is maintained by the aid of the telegraph 
and telephone. The fire department, which includes a 
telegraph fire-alarm, is a model of perfection, unsurpassed 
b y any in the world. A Fire Patrol is also maintained 
by the Board of Underwriters. The commerce of the city 
is rapidly increasing. The value of imports for the year 
1882, including S2,420,606 by rail, amounted to $46,769,151 
against 340,433,675 for 1881, being an increase of $6,335,476. 
The value of merchandise exports during the same pe- 
riod, exclusive of that shipped by rail, amounted to S55,- 
752,428 against $53,664,352 for 1881, being an increase of 
$2,088,076. The value of treasure exports amounted to 
$10,382,304. The public is informed of the current news of 
the day by newspapers published in the English, Ger- 
man, French, Spanish, Scandinavian, Italian, and Chi- 
nese languages. Communication is maintained with bay 
and river points by ferries and steamers, and with various 
inland towns by rail. Two transcontinental railroads, 
the Central Pacific and Southern Pacific, afford rapid 
communication with the Eastern States, and several 
steamship lines maintain communication with various 
ports in California, Oregon, Washington Territory, Alas- 
ka, British Columbia, and Mexico; also with Panama, 
Honolulu, Hong Kong, Yokohama, Sydney, and Auck- 
land. 

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. 

City and County Officers. 

3/a?/or— Washington Bartlett; salary, $3,000 per annum. 
Office, :New City Hall. 

Board of Supervisors — {'^lajoT ex-officio President). 
First Ward, J. T. Sullivan; Second Ward, J. J. Keichen- 
bach; Third Ward, John Shirley; Fourth Ward, Charles 



16 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITV 



H. Burton; Fifth Ward, J. Henley Smith; Sixth Ward, 
E. B. Pond; Seventh Ward, John D. Griffin; Eighth 
Ward, Fleet F. Strother; Ninth Ward, J. B. Lewis; Tenth 
Ward, Herman Ranken; Eleventh Ward, J. G. James; 
Twelfth Ward, Thomas Ash worth; salary, Sl,200 per 
annum each. Office, Xew City Hall. 

Ass€sso7'-J.oms F. Holtz; salary, .?4.000 per annum 
Office, Xew City Hall. 

Auditor-Vi'imHm M. Edgar; salary, .S4, 000 per annum. 
Office, Xew City Hall. 

City and County Attorney and Co// /ise^or— William Craig; 
salary, 85,000 per annum. Office, Xew City Hall. 

CV,?.o/?er-MarcLevingston; salary, .84,000 per annum. 
Office, 731 Mission Street. 

Comity C/erA-— William T. Sesnon; salary. .S4,000 per 
annum. Office, Xew City Hall. 

District Attorney— J. D. Sullivan: salary, 85,000 per 
annum. Office, Old City Hall. 

License C4lector-D. R. McNeill; salarv, 83,000 per 
annum. Office, Xew City Hall. 

Public Administrator-FhiWp A. Roach; salarv, fees 
Office, 318 Pine Street. 

i?eco/-f?e r-William J. Bryan; salary, 8i.000 per annum. 
Office, New City Hall. 

Registrar of Fofers- James A. Johnson; salary, 83,600 
per annum. Office, Xew City Hall. 

67ter///- Patrick Connolly;* salary, 88,000 per annum. 
Office, Old City Hall. 

Superintendent Public Streets — Timoxhj J. Lowney; 
salary, .84,000 per annum. Office, Xew City Hall. 

Surveyor-Geoxge H. Rogers; salary, .8500 per annum 
and fees. Office, Xew City Hall. 

Tax Collector— John H. Grady; salarv, 84,000 per an- 
num. Office, Xew City Hall. 

Treasurer-ChTistian Reis; salary, 84,000 per annum 
Office, Xew City Hall. 

Board of Election Commissioners— Major (President), 



GLIDE TO SAN FRAXCISCO AXD VICIXITY. 17 

Auditor, Tax Collector, City and County Attorney, City 
and County Surveyor; no compensation. Office, New 
City Hall. 

Board of Neio City Hall Commissioners— '^laxov (Presi- 
dent), Auditor, City and County Attorney; salary, Sl,200 
per annum each. Office, New City Hall. 

Board of Park Comjnissioners—Lelsind Stanford (Presi- 
dent), Frank M. Pixley, John Eosenfeld; no compensa- 
tion. Office, Golden Gate Park. 

Commissioners of Insaniti/— Isaac S. Titus, M. D., Levi 
J. Henry, M. D., Arthur P. Hayne, M. D., James M. 
Eaton, M. D. ; salary, fees. Office, New City Hall. 

Gas Inspector— Bohert C. Ames; salary, Sl,800 per an- 
num. Office, Old City Hall. 

Pound-keeper— John Bracken; salary, fees. Office, 
north-west corner of California and Walnut Streets. 

Courts. 

Superior Court— Department No. 1, Thomas K. TTilson, 
Judge. No. 2, Jeremiah F. Sullivan. No. 3, James V. 
Coffey. No. 4, James G. McGuire. No. 5, John Hunt, 
Jr. No. 6, Marcus A. Edmonds. No. 7, Oliver P. Evans. 
No. 8, F. W. Lawler. No. 9 (Probate), John F. Finn. 
No. 10 (Special), F. M. Clough. No. 11 (Criminal), D. J. 
Toohy. No. 12 (Criminal), Kobert Ferral; salary, 84,000 
per annum each. Court-rooms, 1 to 10, New City Hall ; 11 
and 12, Old City Hall. 

Justices' Court- James C. Peunie (Presiding), Edward 
Gilson, George A. Young, Charles H. Wolff, Joseph J. 
Dunne, Justices; salary. Presiding Justice, 83,000 per 
annum; Associate Justices, 82,400 per annum each. 
Court-rooms, south-east corner of Washington and Kearny 
Streets. 

Police CoM/'t— Department No. 1, H. Watson Webb, 
Judge. No. 2, James Lawler, Judge; salary, $4,000 per 
annum each. Court-rooms, Old City Hall. 



18 GL'IDE TO SAX FRA>CISCO A>D VICIMTY. 



Public School Department. 

Board of Education— B.o\iext P. Hastings (President), 
James M. Eaton, Raphael Weill, Lee O. Rodgers, Charles 
E. Travers, Charles D. Cleveland, Jesse A. Melcher, 
Ernest Brand, Frank Conklin, John Cahalin, J. M. 
Foard, Isador Daniel witz; no compensation. Office, Kew 
City Hall. 

Superintendent Public Schools— XnAievr J. Moulder; 
salary, $4,000 per annum. Office, New City Hall. 

Deputy Superintendent— J ose\)h O'Connor; salary, §3,000 
per annum. Office, New City Hall. 

The first American school in San Francisco was opened 
in April, 1847, by a Mr. Marston, with about thirty pupils. 
This was a private enterprise, the scholars being charged 
for tuition. During the same year an effort was made by 
prominent citizens to establish a public school, which re- 
sulted in the erection of a school-house on the corner of 
Clay Street and Brenham Place. On the 21st of Febru- 
ary, 1848, at a meeting called for the purpose, Dr. F. 
Fourgeaud, J. Serrine, AV. H. Davis, Dr. J. Townsend, and 
C. L. Ross were chosen School Trustees, and on April 3rd 
a school was opened under the superintendence of Mr. 
Thomas Douglass, a graduate of Yale College. From a 
census taken by the Board of Trustees it was ascertained 
that the population of the town was about eight hundred, 
of which number sixty were children of suitable age to 
attend school. During the height of the excitement 
occasioned by the favorable reports from the newly dis- 
covered gold mines, the school was for a time closed, but 
was again opened in December, 1848, under the charge of 
William H. Christian, who was succeeded in April, 1849, 
by the Rev. Albert Williams. In the fall of 1849, Mr. J. 
C. Pelton opened a school in the Baptist Church on 
Washington Street, which was sustained partly by vol- 
untary contributions until the spring of 1850, when, upon 
an application to the City Council for assistance, Mr. 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



19 



Pelton was allowed for the services of himself and wife a 
salary of S500 per month. This sum he continued to 
receive until the close of the school in 1851. 

The inauguration of the present school system may be 
said to date from September, 1851, when the City Council 
passed an ordinance dividing the city into seven school 
districts, and providing for the establishment of a free 
school in each. In October following, Messrs. Charles J. 
Brenham, Joseph F. Atwill, Henry E. Lincoln, Charles 
L. Eoss, and John Wilson were elected members of the 
Board of Education, with power to appoint a Superin- 
tendent of Public Schools, at a salary of Sl,200 per annum. 
For this position Colonel T. J. Xevins, a gentlemen well 
versed in school matters, and who had already done much 
for the cause of public education, was selected. He im- 
mediately entered upon his arduous duties, and in a few 
months succeeded in establishing a school in each dis- 
trict. According to the report of the Superintendent for 
the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1852, the number of 
pupils enrolled was two thousand one hundred and 
thirty-tAvo; average daily attendance, four hundred and 
forty-five. Since these measures were adopted, a period 
of thirty-two years, the public schools have increased in 
number and improved in accommodations, in accordance 
with the rapid growth of the city; and through the liber- 
ality of the citizens in sustaining them, it may be said 
that the Public School Department of San Francisco will 
to-day compare favorably with that of any city in the 
Union. The report of the Superintendent for the fiscal 
year ending June 30th, 1882, gives the following statis- 
tics: Number of pupils enrolled, forty thousand seven 
hundred and fifty-two, of whom twenty-one thousand 
four hundred and eighty-five were boys, and nineteen 
thousand two hundred and sixty-seven girls. Average 
daily attendance, twenty-nine thousand four hundred and 
thirty-five. Number of teachers, six hundred and seventy- 
five, of whom fifty-nine were males, and six hundred and 



"20 GUIDE TO SAX FRAXCISCO AND VICINITY. 

sixteen females. Total expenditures for the year, S735,- 
474.61, of which amount 8(323,3^58.45 was paid to teachers. 
Estimated value of school property, S3,137,(X)0. Total 
number of volumes in the school libraries, 34,%0. The 
salaries paid to teachers in the department are as follows: 
High schools, from SlOO to $260 per month; grammar 
schools, from S70 to 8200 per month; primary schools, 
from 850 to 8135 per month; evening schools, principals 
8135 and assistants 850 per month; substitutes receive 
from 82 to S6 per day. In the office of the Board of Edu- 
cation are employed a Secretary, two Assistant Secre- 
taries, a Bookkeeper, a Storekeeper, and a Messenger, at ' 
salaries ranging from 8480 to 82,400 per annum. 

LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. 

Boys' High, Sutter Street between Gough and Octavia. 

Girls' High, Bush Street between Hyde and Larkin. 

Broadway Grammar, Broadway Street between Powell 
and Mason. 

Clement Grammar, Geary Street between Jones and 
Leavenworth. 

Columbia Street Grammar, Columbia Street between 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth. 

Denman Grammar, Xorth-west corner of Bush and 
Taylor Streets. 

Franklin Grammar, Eighth Street between Harrison 
and Bryant. 

Haight Grammar, Mission Street between Twenty-fifth 
and Twenty-sixth. 

Hamilton Grammar, Geary Street between Pierce and 
Scott. 

Hayes Valley Grammar, McAllister Street between 
Franklin and Gough. 

Lincoln Grammar, Fifth Street between Market and 
Mission. 

Mission Grammar, Mission Street between Fifteenth 
and Sixteenth. 



GCroE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICESTIY. 21 



North Cosmopolitau Grammar, Filbert Street between 
Taylor and Jones. 

Rincon Grammar, Silver Street between Second and 
Third. 

South Cosmopolitan Grammar, Eddy Street between 
Polk and Van Xess Avenue. 

Spring Valley Grammar, Broadway Street near Polk. 

"Washington Grammar, South-west corner of Washing- 
ton and Mason Streets. 

Bernal Heights Primary. Courtland Av. near Moultrie. 

Buena Vista Primary, Florida Street near Eighteenth. 

Eighth Street Primary, Eighth Street between Harrison 
and Bryant. 

Emerson Primary, Pine Street between Scott and 
Devisadero. 

Ewing Primary, Harrison Street near Fourth. 

Garfield Primary, Union Street between Kearny and 
Montgomery. 

Golden Gate Primary, Golden Gate Avenue between 
Pierce and Scott. 

Grant Primary, Golden Gate Avenue between Leaven- 
worth and Hyde. 

Greenwich Street Primary, Greenwich Street between 
Jones and Leavenworth. 

Hayes Valley Primary, Grove Street near Larkin. 

Irving Primary, Broadway Street between Montgomery 
and Sansome. 

Jackson Street Primary, Jackson Street between TTeb- 
ster and Fillmore. 

Lincoln Primary, Fifth Street between Market and 
Mission. 

Lombard Street Primary, Lombard Street between 
Broderick and Baker. 

Mission Primary, Mission Street between Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth. 

Noe and Temple Street Primary, Xoe Street near 
Twentv-fifth. 



22 GUIDE TO SAN FRANXISCO AND VICINITY. 



Pine and Larkin Street Primary, Pine Street near 
Larkin. 

Point Lobos Primary, Nineteenth Avenue near Point 
Lobos Avenue. 
Potrero Primary, corner of Kentucky and Napa Streets. 
Powell Street Primary, Powell Street between Wash- 
ington and Jackson. 

Sanchez Street Primary, Sanchez Street between Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth. 

Shotwell Street Primary, Shot well Street between 
Twenty-second and Twenty-third, 

Silver Street Primary, Silver Street between Second 
and Third. 
South Cosmopolitan Primary, Bush Street near Stockton. 
Spring Valley Primary, Union Street near Franklin. 
Starr King Primary, Bryant Street between Sixth and 
Seventh. 

Tehama Primary, Tehama Street between First and 
Second. 

Turk Street Primary, Turk Street between Webster and 
Buchanan. 

Union Primary, North-west corner of Filbert and 
Kearny Streets. 

Valencia Street Primary, Valencia Street between 
Twenty-second and Twenty-third. 

West Mission Street Primary, West Mission Street 
between Hermann and Ridley. 
Fairmount, Chenery Street near PwandaU. 
Laguna Honda, Eighth Avenue near K Street. 
Lobos Avenue, Point Lobos Avenue near Parker 
Avenue. 
Ocean House, San Miguel Road near Ocean Ho use Road. 
South End, William Street near Henry. 
South San Francisco, Fourteenth Avenue near L Street. 
West End, San Jose Road near Six Mile House . 
Harrison Street Ungraded, Harrison Street between 
Tenth and Eleventh. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 23 



Jackson Street Kindergarten, 116 Jackson Street. 

Union Street Kindergarten, 512 Union Street. 

Lincoln E\fening, Fifth Street between Market and 
Mission. 

Mission Evening, Mission Street between Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth. 

Washington Evening, South-west corner of Washingto n 
and Mason Streets. 

Health Department. 

Board of Health— Majot {ex-officio President), William 
A. Douglass, M. D.; James Simpson, M, D.; Henry Gib- 
bons, Jr., M. D.; James Murphy, M. D.; no compensation. 
Office, 14 O'Farrell Street. 

Health Officer— John L. Meares, M. D.; salary, S3,000 
per annum. Office, 14 O'Farrell Street. 

Quarantine 0#cer— William M. Lawlor, M. D. ; salary, 
61,800 per annum. Office, 502 Battery Street. 

City Physician— Charles Blach, M. D.; salary, Sl,80O 
per annum. Office, 514 Kearny. 

Assistant City Physiciaji—S. S. Stambough, M. D. ; sal- 
ary, 81,200 per annum. Office, Old City Hall. 

In addition to the officers enumerated above and physi- 
cians, etc., in public institutions, the employes in the 
department are as follows: Secretary Board of Health, 
salary, §2,100 per annum; Assistant Secretary, 31,200 per 
annum; Messenger, S900 per annum; Six Health Inspect- 
ors, 31,200 per annum each; Market Inspector, 31,200 per 
annum; Superintendent Vaults and Disinterments, 31,200 
per annum; Superintendent City Cemetery, 3900 per an- 
num. 

The report of the Health Officer for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30th, 1882, shows that during the year there were 
5,008 deaths against 4,287 of the year preceding. Of these, 
527 were Mongolians. Estimating the population at 234,- 
520, the annual ratio of deaths per 1,000 population was 
21.34 against 18.27 of the preceding year. This large in- 



24 GLIDE TO SAK FRA^■CISCO AXD VICINITY. 

crease in the death rate is attributed to the defective and 
disgraceful condition of the sewers. 

deferring to the Chinese population, the Health Officer 
says: " The overcrowded condition in which these people 
live, in their unventilated, underground habitations, the 
atmosphere of tlieir rooms reeking with odors arising from 
the smoking of opium and tobacco, and other disgusting 
effluvia, is the principal factor in producing constitutional 
and local diseases; while the ever-present fumes of opium 
and tobacco seem to act as disinfectants upon the germs 
of zymotic diseases. Every time I visit these under- 
ground habitations, 1 am struck with astonishment, not 
that a large number of these people die, but that any of 
them should live, breathing an atmosphere so stifling and 

disgusting." 

Fire Department. 

Board of Fire Commissioners — Frank G. Edwards (Pres- 
ident), Edward Flaherty, George H, Kice, Frederick C. 
Siebe, John Mason; no compensation. Office, Old City 
Hall. 

Chief Engineer— David Scannell; salary, S3,000 per an- 
num. Office, Old City Hall. 

The disastrous conflagration which occurred on Christ- 
mas eve, 1849, destroying 81,000,000 worth of property, 
awakened the citizens of San Francisco to the necessity 
of establishing a fire department. Early in January, 
1850, the Town Council appointed F. D. Kohler Chief En- 
gineer, with instructions to immediately organize as 
efficient a department as circumstances would permit. 
Three small engines belonging to private individuals 
were procured, and three companies, known as tlie San 
Francisco, Empire, and Protection, at once formed. On 
the 4th of May, 1850, the second great fire occurred, de- 
stroying property to the amount of nearly 84,000,000; and 
on the 14th of June, a still more disastrous one laid almost 
the entire business portion of the city in ashes, the loss 
being estimated at §5,000,000. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 25 

On the 1st of July an ordinance was passed regularly 
organizing the fire department, and making appropria- 
tions for the purchase of new apparatus, construction of 
cisterns, etc., and in September following the first elec- 
tion for Chief Engineer was held, resulting in the success 
of F. D. Kohler. On the 17th of this month the fourth 
great fire destroyed the buildings on several blocks; loss 
about 8500,000. These disasters, following in ^uch rapid 
succession, proved the necessity of more ample protection 
against the ravages of the fire-fiend; and at the close of 
the year 1850, eight engine and two hook and ladder com- 
panies had been organized. 

On the 4th of May, 1851, occurred the most terrific con- 
flagration which San Francisco has ever experienced, 
devastating the entire business portion of the city ; about 
fifteen hundred buildings were consunied. and several 
lives lost. Although the fire department worked with a 
heroism worthy of the greatest praise, their efforts were 
for a long time of no avail. The loss by this fire was va- 
riously estimated at from 88,000,000 to 812.000,000. The 
sixth and last great fire of early days broke out on the 
22nd of June following, destroying upwards of S3,000,00() 
worth of property. From the year 1850 until 1866, when 
the volunteer department was disbanded, it had gradu- 
ally increased in strength and discipline, and at the latter 
date consisted of fourteen engine, three hook and ladder, 
and three hose companies, all well manned and equipped. 

The paid fire department was organized on the 3rd of 
December, 1836, in accordanoe with an act of the legisla- 
ture authorizing the formation of six engine, two hook 
and ladder, and five hose companies; the force consisting 
of one hundred and fifty-six officers and men. The entire 
force at present, 18S3. consists of three hundred and three 
officers and men; twelve steam fire engines; eight hose 
carriages, four hook and ladder trucks, and a fire boat, in 
active service, and several steam fire engines and hose 
carriages in reserv-e at the corporation yard. The salaries 



26 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

of the members per annum are: Chief Engineer, 83,000; 
Assistant Chief Engineer, §2,400; District Engineers, 
81,800; Clerk Board of Fire Commissioners, 81,800; Mes- 
senger Board of Fire Commissioners, $900; Superinten- 
dent of Engines, 81,800; Assistant Superintendent of 
Engines, 81,680; Substitute Engineer and Machinist, 
81,680; Storekeeper Corporation Yard, 81,500; Corporation 
Yard Draj;man, 81,080; Hydrantmen, 81,080; Veterinary 
Surgeon, 8720; Carpenter, 81,200; Corporation Y'ard Watch- 
man, 8900; Foremen, 8540; Engineers of Steam Engines, 
81,680; Stokers, 81,080; Drivers, 81,080; Tillermen, 81,080; 
Stewards, 8960; Extra men, 8420. 

LOCATION OF APPARATUS. 

Engine "No. 1 — Pacific Street between Montgomery and 
Sansome. 

Engine No. 2— Bush Street between Kearny and Dupont. 

Engine No. 3 — California Street between Leavenworth 
and Hyde. 

Engine No. 4 — Second Street between Natoma and How- 
ard. 

Engine No. 5 — Stockton Street between Pacific and 
Broadway. 

Engine No. 6— Sixth Street between Folsom and Harri- 
son. 

Engine No. 7 — Sixteenth Street between Valencia and 
Guerrero. 

Engine No. 8— Pacific Avenue between Polk Street and 
Van ;Ness Avenue. 

Engine No. 9 — Main Street between Folsom and Harri- 
son. 

Engine No. 10— Bryant Street between Third and Fourth. 

Engine No. 11 — Fourteenth Avenue near Eailroad Av- 
enue, South San Francisco. 

Engine No. 12— South-west corner of Drumm and Com- 
mercial Streets. 

Hose No. 1— Jackson Street between Front and Davis. 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICLNITY. 27 

Hose Xo. 2— Post Street near Fillmore. 

Hose No. 3— Folsom Street between Twenty-first and 
Twenty-second. 

Hose No. 4— Stockton Street between Greenwich and 
Lombard. 

Hose No. 5— Market Street between Tenth and Eleventh. 

Hose No. 6 — McAllister Street between Webster and 
Buchanan. 

Hose No. 7 — Tennessee Street between Sierra and Napa. 

Hose No. 8 — Filbert Street between Webster and Fill- 
more. 

Hose No. 9 (Fire Boat Governor Irwin)— Broadway 
wharf. 

Hook and Ladder No. 1— O'Farrell Street between Du- 
pont and Stockton. 

Hook and Ladder No. 2— Broadway Street between Du- 
pont and Stockton. 

Hook and Ladder No. 3— Market Street between Tenth 
and Eleventh. 

Hook and Ladder No. 4— Pacific Street between Jones 
and Leavenworth. 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph. 

Superintendent— John CviXXQ.u-. appointed by the Board 
of Supervisors, salary 82,300 per annum. Office, Brenham 
Place between Clay and Washington Streets. 

This department was established in April, 1865. The 
force consists of the Superintendent, three Operators, and 
three Line Eepairers. One hundred and thirty miles of 
wire stretched on poles and houses connect the office 
with the signal boxes, and with alarm gongs placed in the 
different engine, hook and ladder, and hose houses, police 
stations, etc. There are eight alarm bells, which are oper- 
ated by electrical machinery, the principal one weighing 
four thousand five hundred pounds, being located in the 
tower of the Fire Alarm office. The signal boxes in use 
are both crank and automatic ones, an alarm from the 



28 



GCIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



former being given by turning the crank steadily to the 
right forty times without stopping, from the latter by 
pulling down the hook once and letting go. In case of 
tumult or riot, whereby the services of the police force 
are required, the alarm consists of ten strokes upon the 
bells and gongs repeated live times. 

LOCATION OF SIGNAL BOXES. 



2 — Mason and Lombard. 

3 — Stockton andGreenwich. 

4— Sansome and Greenwich. 

5 — Battery and Union. 

6 — Montgomery and Green. 

7 — Kearny and Union. 

8 — Powell and Union. 

9 — Dupont and Vallejo. 
12— California and Kearny. 
13— Front and Broadway. 
14 — Stockton and Broadway. 
15— Clay and East. 
16 — Mason and Pacific. 
17 — Pacific and Kearny. 
18 — Sansome and Jackson. 
19 — Davis and AVashington. 
21— Clav and Kearny. 
23— Clay and Taylor. 
24 — Clay and Powell. 
25 — Wash, and Dupont. 
26— Clay and Battery. 
27— Montg'ry and Commer'l. 
28 — Pine and Dupont. 
29— Stockton and California. 
31 — Sansome and Halleck. 
32 — California and Drumm. 
M — Mission and Steuart. 
35 — Montgomery and Pine. 
36 — Folsom and Steuart. 
37 — Battery and Bush. 
38 — Market and Second. 
39 — Howard and Spear. 
41 — Sutter and Jones. 
42 — Geary and Mason. 
43 — O'Farrell near Dupont. 
45 — O'Farrell and Jones. 
46 — Sutter and Kearnv. 
47— Eddv and Powell. 



48 — Geary and Kearny. 
49 — Stockton and Sutter. 
51 — Folsom and Beale. 
52— Mission and Fremont. 
53 — King, east of Third. 
54 — Second near Howard. 
5<) — Bryant near First. 
57 — Brannan and Second. 
58 — Folsom and First. 
59— P. M. S. S. Co.'s wharf. 
61— Howard and Third. 
62 — Mission and Fourth. 
63 — Harrison and Fourth. 
64— Howard and Fifth. 
65 — Mission and Sixth. 
67 — Harris'n and Hawth'ne. 
68 — Brannan and Fourth. 
69— Bryant and Third. 
71 — Mission and Eleventh. 
72 — Mission and Thirteenth. 
73 — Howard and Eighth. 
74 — Sixteenth nr Valencia. 
75 — Jones and McAllister. 
76 — Market and Hayes. 
78 — Folsom and Ninth. 
79— Folsom and Twelfth. 
81 — Franklin and Hayes. 
82— Fulton and Gough. 
83 — Octavia and Oak. 
84 — Valencia and Market. 
85 — Laguua and Haj'es. 
86 — Oak and Van Ness Ave. 
87 — Haight and Webster. 
91— Hvde and Turk. 
92— Franklin and Turk. 
93 — Jones and Turk. 
94— Polk and Ellis. 
95— Taylor and Market. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



29 



96— Ellis and Taylor. 
126 — Hyde and Union. 
124— ^Voolen M'ls, Black Ft. 
125 — Filbert and Jones. 
126 — Hyde and \\'asliington. 
127— Broadway and Polk. 
128— Clay and Leavenwortli. 
129 — Pacitic and LeaTe'w'tb. 
132— Pine and Mason. 
134 — Bush and Hyde. 
135 — Bush and Polk. 
136 — Post and Van Ness Are. 
137— Post and Larkin. 
138 — California and Larkin. 
139 — O'Farrell and Hyde. 
142 — Valencia and Twentieth. 
143 — Mission and Twenty-s'd. 
145 — Folsom and Twenty-s'd. 
146 — Folsom and Sixteenth. 
147 — Howard and Twentieth. 
148— Mission and Sixteenth. 
149 — Folsom and Eighteenth. 
152 — Brannan and Eighth. 
153 — Harrison and Seventh. 
154 — Bryant and Sixth. 
156 — Fourth and Berry. 
157 — Fourth and Folsom. 
158— Folsom and Fifth. 
159 — Folsom and Sixth. 
162 — Pacihc and Franklin. 
163 — Sacram'nto and Fr'nk'n. 
164-Clay and Polk. 
172— McAllist'r and Buch'n. 
173 — Ellis and Buchanan. 
174 — Turk and Fillmore. 
175 — Webster and Grove. 
176 — Post and Octavia. 
178 — Buchanan and Geary. 
182— Sixth and Townsend. 
183— Mission and Eighth. 
192 — California and Front. 
193— Hyde and Chestnut. 



194— Stockton and Francisco. 
213 — Bush and Buchanan. 
214 — Bush and Steiner. 
215 — Washi'gt'n and Webst'r. 
216 — Sacram'nto and Fillm'e. 
217 — Bush and Devisadero. 
218— Post and Fillmore. 
219— Filbert and Fillmore. 
231— Howard and 24th. 
234— Harrison and 24th. 
235— Potrero Ave and 22nd. 
236— Mission and 26th. 
237— Dolores and 22nd. 
238— Potrero Av.& Santa Cla. 
239 — Butte and Columbia. 
241 — Gough and Bush. 
243— Clay and Scott. 
245 — Geary and Steiner. 
246 — Gearv and Devisadero. 
247— Turk and Scott. 
248 — Devisadero and Fulton. 
251 — Broadway and Octavia. 
253 — Union and Laguna. 
254 — Union and Pierce. 
261 — Stevenson and Ecker. 
271 — Seventeenth & Church. 
273— Eighteenth e. of Castro. 
274 — Guerrero and 24th. 
275— Church and 24th. 
281— San Bruno E. and 28th. 
283— Church and 28th. 
284— Mission and 29th. 
291 — Jones and Yallejo. 
312 — Jackson and Laguna. 
314 — California and Laguna. 
321 — Pierce and California. 
324 — S'cr'm'nto and Brod'r'k, 
325— Cal. and Central Ave. 
326— Sutter and Baker. 
341 — Ellis and Pierce. 
351 — Mont'y and Broadway. 
361— Ridley and Guerrero. 



So2(th San Francisco Branch. 



2— San Bruno Pw. and 28th. 
3 — First Av. and Kentucky. 
4 — Fifteenth Ave. and P. 



5 — East side Ky. nr Sierra. 
6 — Butte and Kentucky. 
7— Fifth Avenue and M. 



30 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Fire Patrol. 

This valuable auxiliary to the Fire Department was 
established in May, 1875, by the Board of Fire Under- 
writers, for the purpose of extinguishing incipient confla- 
grations, and protecting property from damage by water. 
The force consists of fourteen men, including the Captain 
and two Lieutenants, a portion of whom are constantly on 
watch. When an alarm is given, the celerity with which 
they respond is truly remarkable, and well worth witness- 
ing. The apparatus consists of light wagons equipped 
with rubber and oil-cloth covers, fire extinguishers, and 
other necessary appurtenances. The Patrol is divided 
into two companies, one being located on the soutli-west 
corner of Stevenson and Ecker Streets, and the other on 
Grove Street between Larkin and Polk. 

Police Department. 

Board of Police Commissioners— U\c\x?i.x(S. P. Hammond 
(President), salary, $3,000 per annum. William Alvord, 
Eobert J. Tobin, 81,200 per annum each, and Chief of Po- 
lice {ex-officio). Office, Old City Hall. 

Chief of Po//ce— Patrick Crowley, appointed by the 
board; salary, $4,000 per annum. Office, Old City Hall. 

The Police force consists of four hundred and tive 
men, including the Chief of Police, five Captains of Po- 
lice; Clerk Chief of Police; Property Clerk; twelve De- 
tectives; thirty-eight Sergeants; ten Corporals ; and three 
hundred and thirty-seven Patrolmen. They are a well- 
disciplined and efficient body of men, and have proved 
able in every emergency to quell riotous disturbances 
and preserve the peace of the city. The Patrolmen are 
instructed in military tactics under command of the 
Captains of Police, and when on parade present quite a 
soldierly appearance. When on patrol duty they are 
armed with a club and revolver. The salaries per annum 
are: Captains of Police, $1,800; Clerk Chief of Police, 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 31 

31,800; Property Clerk, 81,800; Detectives, 81,500; Ser- 
geants, 81,500; Corporals, 81,401; Patrolmen, 81,224. The 
number of arrests made during the fiscal year ending 
June SOth, 1882, were twenty-three thousand and eleven, 
an average of sixty-two for each officer. 

POLICE STATIONS. 

Central Station, Old City Hall; Branch Stations, 5^2 
Davis Street, 247 Steuart Street, 829 Folsom Street, Ne\^ 
City Hall, 207 Seventeenth Street, Corner Polk and Jack- 
son Streets, and Potrero; Telegraph Stations, 833 Sutter 
Street, 961 Mission Street, and Corner California and Fill- 
more Streets. 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS. 

Old City Hall — One of the landmarks of early days 
is a brick building located on Kearny Street between 
Washington and Merchant. As the Xew City Hall ap- 
proaches completion, the public offices are gradually 
being removed to that building, and there now remains 
in the old edilice only the following: Sheriff, Fire Com- 
missioners and Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, 
Police Commissioners, Chief of Police, District Attorney, 
Superior Court Xos. 11 and 12, and Police Courts Xos. 1 
and 2. In the basement are located the Central Police 
Station, City Prison, and City Receiving Hospital. 

New City Hall— This building, which when complet- 
ed will be the largest and one of the most magnificent of 
the kind in the United States, is located on a triangular 
plot of ground bounded by McAllister Street, Larkiu 
Street, and Park Avenue. The dimensions of the edifice 
according to the original plan are eight hundred feet on 
Park Avenue, six hundred and fifty feet on McAllister 
Street, and five hundred and fifty feet on Larkin Street. 
Its construction was commenced in 1871, but owing to a 
want of funds the work has at times been suspended. It 
is now being completed as rapidly as circumstances will 



32 GUIDE TO SAN TRANCISCO AND VICINITr. 



admit, under the supervision of the Board of Xew City- 
Hall Commissioners, composed of the Mayor, Auditor, 
and City and County Attorney, who receive for their 
services a salary of $1,200 per annum each. The report of 
the architect submitted to the commissioners January 20th, 
1883, shows the total expenditure up to date to be .?3,365,- 
367.82. The cost of completing the building, laying out of 
grounds, etc., is estimated at $1,200,000. In the basement 
are located the offices of the License Co]lector,Superintend- 
ent of Streets, Registrar of Voters, and Commissioners of 
Insanity; also the Grand Jury Rooms and a Police Station. 
On the first or main floor are the offices of the Mayor, 
Auditor, Treasurer, Tax Collector, Assessor, County 
Clerk, and New City Hall Commissioners. On the sec- 
ond floor are the chambers and office of the Board of 
Supervisors, and the Court-rooms of Departments 3, 4, 6, 
7, 8, 9, and 10 of the Superior Court. On the third floor 
are the offices of the City and County Attorney, Board of 
Education, Superintendent of Public Schools, and Sur- 
veyor, and the Court-rooms of Departments 1, 2, and 5 of 
the Superior Court. The Hall of Records, situated at the 
eastern extremity of the City Hall grounds, is a circular 
building of fine appearance, surmounted by a dome rising 
to a height of one hundred and thirty-four feet. It is 
ninety-five feet in external diameter, and connected with 
the City Hall by an open arcade. 

County Jail— Located on Broadway Street between 
Kearny and Dupont, is an old, two-story, brick building, 
totally inadequate to accommodate the increasing num- 
ber of prisoners. When overcrowded it has been neces- 
sary to establish branch jails or remove a portion of the 
prisoners to the House of Correction. Visitors are admit- 
ted on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays, from 11 a. m. 
to 2 p. M., on procuring a permit at the Sheriff's office. 

House of Correction— This institution is located on 
the Old San Jose Road, about five miles distant from the 
New City Hall. The building is two stories in height. 



GUIDE TO SAJS FRANCISCO AXD VICES'ITY. 33 



built of brick, witb stone foundation, at a cost of about 
§125,000. Strict discipline is maintained, and the prison- 
ers are compelled to Avork eight hours each day in the 
work-shops or on the roads in the Ticinity. During the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1882, the number of prison- 
ers committed was five hundred and fourteen males, and 
one hundred and fifty-five females, of whom three hun- 
dred and forty-six were foreign born, and three hundred 
and twenty-three native born. The total expenses of the 
institution for the year was 841,102.55. Visitors are ad- 
mitted at any time during the day. Samuel Shear, Su- 
perintendent. 

Industrial School— This is a reformatory institution 
for wayward and ungovernable boys, who are committed 
at the request of their parents for leading dissolute lives, 
as well as for those arrested and convicted of crime. It 
is a two-story brick and stone building with basement, 
occupying a pleasant site on the Old San Jose Road, about 
five nailes distant from the Xew City Hall, and is sur- 
rounded by extensive grounds, used for farming, garden- 
ing, or pasturage. The boys are compelled to labor four 
hours each day in the work-shops or on the farm; also to 
attend school, where they receive instruction in arithme- 
tic, reading, spelling, writing, geography, and grammar. 
The school hours are from 1 to 3:30 p. m. and from 6: 15 
to 7: 30 p. M. daily, except Saturday and Sundays. An 
excellent brass band, numbering eighteen boys, under the 
charge and tuition of a music teacher, is one of the fea- 
tures of the institution. During the fiscal year ending 
June 30th, 1882, there were committed eighty-nine boys 
from eight to nineteen years of age, and forty-six girls 
from eleven to seventeen years of age. The girls are 
immediately transferred to the Magdalen Asylum, an 
institution under the charge of the Sisters of Mercy, 
located on Potrero Avenue. Visitors are admitted at 
any time during the day. J. F. McLaughlin, Superin- 
tendent. 



34 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



WARDS AND ELECTION PRECINCTS. 

First Ward— Bounded by the Bay of San Francisco 
on the north and east; by Washington Street on the 
south; by Kearny Street on the west. This ward also in- 
cludes the islands in the bay and the Farallones. Num- 
ber of Election Precincts, eight. 

Second Ward— Bounded by the Bay of San Francis- 
co on the north; by Kearny Street on the east; by Val- 
lejo Street on the south ; by Larkin Street on the west. 
Number of Election Precincts, nine. 

Third Ward.— Bounded by Washington Street on the 
north; by the Bay of San Francisco and Market Street on 
the east; by California Street on the south; by Kearny 
Street on the west. Number of Election Precincts, three. 

Fourth Ward— Bounded by Vallejo Street on the 
north; by Kearny Street on the east; by Washington 
Street on the south ; by Larkin Street on the west. Num- 
ber of Election Precincts, eight. 

Fifth Ward— Bounded by California Street on the 
north; by Market Street on the south-east; by Kearny 
Street on the west. Number of Election Precincts, two. 

Sixth Ward— Bounded by Washington Street on the 
north; by Kearny Street on the east; by Pine Street on 
the south; by Larkin Street on the west. Number of 
Election Precincts, six. 

Seventh Ward— Bounded by Market Street on the 
north-west; by the Bay of San Francisco on the north- 
east; by Harrison Street on the south-east; by Second 
Street on the south-west. Number of Election Precincts, 
eight. 

Eighth Ward— Bounded by Pine Street on the north; 
by Kearny Street on the east; by Market Street on the 
south-east; by Larkin Street on the west. Number of 
Election Precincts, eighteen. 

Ninth Ward— Bounded by Harrison Street on the 
north-west; by the Bay of San Francisco on the north- 



GUIDE TO SA>- FRANCISCO A>-T) VICINITY. 35 



east; by Cliannel Street on the south-east; by Seventh 
Street on the south-west. Number of Election Precincts, 
ten. 

Tenth Ward— Bounded by Market Street on the 
north-west; by Second Street on the north-east; by Har- 
rison Street on the south-east; by Seventh Street on the 
south-west. Xumber of Election Precincts, twenty-five. 

Eleventh "Ward— Bounded by Channel Street from 
Third to Seventh, by Market Street from Seventh to Rid- 
ley, and by Ridley Street and the line of Ridley produced 
due west to the Pacific Ocean on the north ; by Seventh 
Street from Market to Channel and the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco on the east; by the county line on the south; by 
the Pacific Ocean on the west. Xumber of Election Pre- 
cincts, thirty-three. 

Twelfth Ward— Bounded by the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco and the Pacific Ocean on the north; by Larkin 
Street on the east; by Market Street from Larkin to Rid- 
ley and Ridley Street and the line of Ridley produced 
due west to the Pacific Ocean on the south; by the Pa- 
cific Ocean on the west. Number of Election Precincts, 
twenty-four. 

FEDERAL OFFICERS. 
Army, Miliiarij Division of the Paci/ic- Maj.-Gen. J. M. 
Schofield Commanding. Headquarters, Presidio; Quarter- 
masters Department, 36 New Montgomery Street. 

Army, Board of Engineers Pacific Coast— Col. Charles 
S. Stewart in charge construction of Fort ^Yinfield Scott, 
Batteries at Angel Island, and Fort Mason at Point San 
Jose; Lieut. Col. George H. Mendell in charge River 
and Harbor Improvements and Fortifications; Capt. 
Albert H. Payson, Recorder. Office, 533 Kearny Street. 

Chief Supervisor of Z/ecf/ons— Nathaniel Holland. 
Office, U. S. Appraiser's Building. 

Circuit Courts. J. Field Presiding Justice; Lorenzo 
Sawyer, Circuit Judge. U. S. Appraiser's Building. 



36 GLIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Coast and Geodetic Survey— Prof. George Davidson As- 
sistant in charge. Office, U. S. Appraiser's Building. 

Collector of the Po?-«— Eugene L. Sullivan. Office, Cus- 
tom-house. 

Court Commissioners— L. S. B. Sawyer, J. F. O'Beirne, 
Southard Hoffman, A. D. Grim-wood, U. S. Appraiser's 
Building; W. E. Daingerlield, 234 Montgomery; John J. 

Wone, 12Kevada Block; T. A. O'Brien, 324 Pine; T. H. 
Holt, 400 Montgomery; Alfred Rising, 216 Sansome; W. 
Gallagher, 432 Montgomery. 

District Attorney— '&-eimne\ J. Hilborn. Office, U. S. 
Appraiser's Building. 

District Court— Ogden Hoffman, Judge. U. S. Apprais- 
er's Building. 

Geological Survey— Cail Rabe, Attache. Office, 155 
Kew Montgomery Street. 

Inspector of Boilers— Jsunes Hillman. Office, U. S. Ap- 
praiser's Building. 

Inspector of Hulls— John H. Freeman. Office, U. S. 
Appraiser's Building. 

Internal Revenue Agent— Hovace Kellogg. Office, U. S. 
Appraiser's Building. 

Internal Bevenue C'o/^ec^or— Chancellor Hartson. Office, 
U. S. Appraiser's Building. 

Land Oj^ce— William R. Wheaton, Register; Charles 
H. Chamberlain, Receiver. Office, 610 Commercial 
Street. 

Life-Saving Service— John White, Superintendent. Of- 
fice, U. S. Appraiser's Building; Boat Station, ocean beach 
near Golden Gate Park. 

Lighthouse Department Pacific Coast (Twelfth District) 
—Commander George W. Coffin, U. S. X., Inspector; Capt. 
Albert H. Pay son, U. S. A., Engineer. Office, U. S. Ap- 
praiser's Building. 

Marine Hospital— J ohn Vanaant, M. D., Surgeon in 
Charge. Office, U. S. Appraiser's Building; Hospital, Pre- 
sidio Reservation. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 37 



Marshal— ISloses M. Drew. Office, U. S. Appraiser's 
Building. 

Mint— Edwa.Td F. Burton, Superintendent. Office, 
North-west corner of Fifth and Mission Streets. 

Naval Officer Port of San Francisco— B. J. Watson. 
Office, Custom-house. 

Pay Director U. S. iV".— Caspar Schenck. Office, U. S. 
Appraiser's Building. 

Pension Agent— Henry Cox. Office, 620 Washington 
Street. 

Post-office Iiupector—¥. W. Schaurte. Office, 320 San- 
some Street. 

Postmaster—^. W. Backus. Office, Xorth-west corner of 
Washington and Battery Street s. 

Secret Service Division— Henry Finnegass, Agent. Office, 
U. S. Appraiser's Building. 

Shipping Commissioner— J. D. Stevenson. Office, 118 
Jackson Street. 

Signal Service U. S. ^.—Nelson Gorom, Observer in 
Charge. Office, 42 Merchant Exchange. 

Special Agent Treasury Department— 3 o^e^h F. Evans. 
Office, U. S. Appraiser's Building. 

Sub-Treasury—^. W. Spaulding, Assistant Treasurer. 
Office, 610 Commercial Street. 

Superintendent Railway Mail Service— H. J. McKusick. 
Office, South-west corner of Jackson and Battery Streets. 

Supervising Inspector of Steam Vessels— C. C. Bern is. 
Office, U. S. Appraiser's Building . 

Surveyor-General California— Willmm H. Brow n. Office , 
610 Commercial Street. 

Surveyor of the Pjrt-John M. Morton. Office, Cus- 
tom-house. 

POST-OFFICE, CUSTOM-HOUSE, ETC. 

Post-office— Located on the first floor of the Custom - 
house building, north-west corner of Washington and 
Battery Streets. The apartments occupied are totally 



38 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



inadequate in size to afford proper facilities for the trans- 
action of the increasing business of the department, and 
a bill is now before Congress to authorize the erection of 
a commodious edifice in a more central part of the city. 

Office Houks— General Delivery open from 8 a.m. to 
7 p. M., Sundays from 1 to 2 p. m.; Carriers' Department 
open from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m., Sundays from 1 to 2 p. m.; 
Stamp Department open from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. ; Registra- 
tion Department open from 8 a. m. to 5 p. ai.; Money- 
order Department open from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. The three 
last-named departments are closed on Sundays through- 
out the entire day. 

Branch Offices— Station A, 1309 Polk Street; Station 

B, south-west corner of Mission and Eighth Streets, open 
from 8 A. M. to 6 p. m., Sundays from 2 to 3 p. si. ; Station 

C, north-east corner of Mission and Twentieth Streets, 
open from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m., Sundays from 2 to 3 p. m. 

Delr'ery and Collection of Letters— Seventy-two 
carriers are employed, who deliver letters on their respect- 
ive routes from once to five times daily. Letters are 
taken from the street boxes located throughout the city 
from two to nine times daily, according to the importance 
of the districts. On each box will be found a notice stat- 
ing at what hours letters are collected. 

Domestic Tostagf.— First-class Matter embraces letters, 
postal cards, and all matter wholly or partly in writing, 
except proof-sheets, manuscript copy, etc., as noted un- 
der third-class matter. Postage as follows : Letters, three 
cents for each half-ounce or fraction thereof (on and after 
October 1st, 1883, the postage will be reduced to two cents). 
Postal cards one cent each, paid by the stamp impressed 
on the cards. Drop letters, two cents for each half-ounce 
or fraction thereof at letter-carrier offices, and one cent for 
each half-ounce or fraction thereof at offices where deliv- 
ery by carrier is not established. Second-class Matter 
embraces all newspapers and periodicals which are issued 
at stated intervals from known offices of publication or 



GUroE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 39 



news agencies, to regular subscribers or news agents. 
Postage, two cents for each pound or fraction thereof. 
Third-class Matter embraces books, transient newspapers 
and periodicals, circulars, and other matter wholly in 
print (not included in the second-class), proof-sheets, 
corrected proof-sheets, and manuscript copy accompany- 
ing the same, lithographs, chromo-lithographs, engrav- 
ings, printed envelopes, blank-books, heliotypes, photo- 
graphic and stereoscopic views— packages not to exceed 
four pounds in weiglit. Postage, one cent for each two 
ounces or fraction thereof. Fourth-class Matter embraces 
all matter not included in the first, second, or third class, 
which is not in its form or nature liable to destroy, de- 
face, or otherwise damage the contents of the mail bag, 
or harm the person of any one engaged in the postal ser- 
vice, and is not above the weight provided by law, which 
is not to exceed four pounds for each package thereof, 
except that single books without regard to weight are 
admissible as fourth-class matter. Postage, one cent for 
each ounce or fraction thereof. 

Foreign Postage— To countries embraced in the Postal 
Union, including Argentine Eepublic, Austria, Belgium, 
Brazil, Chili, China (Hong Kong, etc., via San Francisco), 
Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and 
Ireland, Greece, Honduras, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nether- 
lands, Newfoundland, Norway, Persia, Peru, Portugal, 
Eussia, Sandwich Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, 
Turkey, Venezuela, etc., the rates of postage are uniform, 
as follows: Letters, five cents for each half-ounce or frac- 
tion thereof. Postal cards, two cents each. Newspapers 
and other printed matter, one cent for each two ounces or 
fraction thereof. 

To the Dominion of Canada, including British Columbia, 
Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edwards 
Island, Province of Ontario, Province of Quebec, and 
Yancouvers Island, the rates of postage on all classes of 
mail matter are the same as to offices of the United States, 



40 



CUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AXD VICINITY. 



except samples of merchandise. The weight of each 
package is limited to eight ounces, and the postage 
charge is ten cents per package. 

The rates of postage to countries not enumerated above 
can be ascertained by making inquiries at the stamp win- 
dow, or by referring to a Postal Index, which will be 
found hanging in the corridor of the post-office. 

Registration— The registry system is intended to se- 
cure to valuable mail matter in its transmission through 
the mails the utmost security within the province of the 
post-office department. The fee on any registered matter, 
domestic or foreign, is fixed at ten cents on each letter or 
parcel, to be affixed in stamps, in addition to the postage. 
Postal Money-orders— The money-order system is 
intended to promote public convenience, and to secure 
safety in the transfer througli the mails of small sums of 
money. A money-order may be issued for any amount 
from one cent up to fifty dollars, inclusive. The fees for 
domestic money-orders are as follows: On orders n ot ex- 
ceeding fifteen dollars, ten cents; over fifteen dollars and 
not exceeding thirty dollars, fifteen cents; over thirty 
dollars and not exceeding forty dollars, twenty cents; 
over forty dollars and not exceeding fifty dollars, twenty- 
fiv.e cents. 

The fees for the issue of international money -orders are 
as follows: To Great Britain and Ireland, on orders not 
exceeding ten dollars, twenty-five cents; over ten dollars 
and not exceeding twenty dollars, fifty cents ; over twenty 
dollars and not exceeding thirty dollars, seventy cents; 
over thirty dollars and not exceeding forty dollars, 
eighty-five cents; over forty dollars and not exceeding 
fifty dollars, one dollar. To Belgium, Canada, France, 
German Empire, India, Italy, Jamaica, New South Wales, 
New Zealand, Switzerland, Tasmania, and Victoria, Aus- 
tralia, on orders not exceeding ten dollars, fifteen cents; 
over ten dollars and not exceeding twenty dollars, thirty 
cents; over twenty dollars and not exceeding thirty doi- 



GUroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 41 



lars, forty-five cents; over thirty dollars and not exceed- 
ing forty dollars, sixty cents; over forty dollars and not 
exceeding fifty dollars, seventy-five cents. 

Departure of Mails— The mails for offices on the Pa- 
cific Coast, Eastern States, Europe, etc.. close as follows: 

Alameda, Berkeley, and Oakland, 5:45, 7:30,11:10 a.m. 
and 4 p. m. 

Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, New Orleans, and points 
in Mexico via Tucson and El Paso, 9 a. m. 

Australia, Honolulu, New Zealand, New Caledonia, 
and Fiji Islands, via steamer every four weeks, 12 m. 

Central America, via P. M. S. S. Co.'s steamers twice a 
month, 8:30 a. m. 

China, Japan, Manila, Calcutta, Bombay, Singapore, 
and Java, via steamer twice a month, 12:30 p. m. 

Great Britain (closed mails), Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Saturday, 2 p. m. 

Mexico, via S. P. E. R. to points on the line of the Atchi- 
son, Topeka, & Santa Fe and Mexican Central Eailroads, 
9 a. m.; via C. & M. S. S. Co.'s steamers to Magdalena 
Bay, Cape St. Lucas, Mazatlan, La Paz, and Guaymas, 
once a month, 11 a. m.; via P. M. S. S. Co.'s steamers to 
Mazatlan, San Bias, Manzanillo, Acapulco, etc., twice a 
month, 8:30 a. m. 

Oregon, Washington Territory, etc., via Oregon Division 
C. P. R. R., 7 : 30 a. M. ; via steamer to Astoria and Portland, 
twice a week, 9: 15 a. m. 

Overland, Eastern States, and Europe, 3 p. m. 

Petaluma, Healdsburg, Santa Rosa, Cloverdale, etc., 
and points in Lake, Mendocino, and Humboldt counties, 
2 p. M. 

Redding and other points in northern California, via 
Oregon Division C. P. R. R., 7 : 30 A. m. 

Sacramento City, 7 : 30 a. m. and 3 p. m. 

San Jose, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, Gilroy, etc. (spe- 
cial), 7 : 30 A. M. and 2 : 40 p. m. 

San Queutin and San Rafael, 8 a. m. and 4: 30 p. m. 



42 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

San Rafael, Tomales, and Duncan's Mills, 9:40 a. m. 

South America (West Coast), via P. M. S. S. Co.'s steam- 
ers twice a month, 8: 30 a. m. 

Southern California, via Central and Southern Pacific 
Railroads, 9 a. m. 

Tahiti, Marquesas, and Hawaiian Islands, by ship every 
opportunity. 

Vallejo, Calistoga, and other points in Solano, Napa, 
Lake, Yolo, and Colusa counties, 7:30 a. m. and 3: 30 p. m. 

Victoria, B. C, per steamer, 10th, 20th, and 30th of each 
month, 1 p. M. 

Custom-house — Located on the north-west corner of 
"Washington and Battery Streets, is a three-story brick 
building, erected in 1855 at a cost of about $900,000. Like 
other public edilices erected in early days, it is now too 
small to afford proper facilities for the transaction of 
business. Only the second and third floors of the build- 
ing are used for Custom-house purposes, the first floor 
being occupied by the Post-office Department. Office 
hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. The receipts for duties on 
imports during the year 1882 amounted to 69,251,795 
against §7,446,000 in 1881. 

United States Mint— Located on the north-west cor- 
ner of Fifth and Mission Streets, is an elegant and massive 
edifice, constructed of granite and sandstone. It is two 
stories in height besides the basement, and affords ample 
accommodations for the transaction of business. About 
two hundred and forty-five persons, males and females, 
are employed in the various departments. During the 
year 1882 there were coined 1,125,000 double eagles, 132,000 
eagles, 969,000 half-eagles, and 9,250,000 dollars, amounting 
in value to 828,665,000 in gold, and $9,250,000 in silver. 
Office hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Visitors admitted from 
9 to 11:30 a. m. 

United States Treasury Building — Located on 
Commercial Street between Montgomery and Kearny, is a 
substantial, four-story brick edifice, erected in 1877 at a 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 43 

cost of about $100,000. The first floor is occupied by the 
U. S. Treasury Department; tlie second by the Register 
and Receiver of the General Land Office; the third and 
fourth by the U. S. Surveyor-General. In the corridor on 
the third floor is a cabinet containing fine specimens of 
ore from different mines throughout California. 

United States Appraiser's Building— Located on 
Sansome Street between AYashington and Jackson, is a 
large and handsome four-story brick structure, com- 
pleted in 1879 at a cost of about $1,000,000. On the first 
floor are the offices of the Internal Revenue Collector, 
Internal Revenue Agent, Superintending Surgeon of the 
U. S. Marine Hospital, Special Agent Treasury Depart- 
ment, Pay Director U. S. Navy, Superintendent Life-Sav- 
ing Service, Supervising Inspector Steam Vessels, Local 
Inspectors Steam Vessels, and Agent Secret Service 
Division. On the second floor are the offices of the U. S. 
Appraisers, Assistant Appraisers, and the Coast and 
Geodetic Survey. On the third floor are the U. S. Circuit 
and U. S. District Courts, and Judge Chambers and offices 
of the U. S. Circuit and District Courts Clerks, U. S. 
District Attorney, and U. S. Marshal. On the fourth 
floor are the offices of the Chief Supervisor of Elections, 
Lighthouse Inspector and Engineer, Grand Jury and 
Petit Jury Rooms, Prisoners' Room, and Coast Survey 
Storerooms. 

MILITARY POSTS AND FORTIFICATIONS. 

Alcatraz Island — Situated about two miles north- 
west of Telegraph Hill, is strongly fortified, and com- 
mands the entrance to the harbor. It rises abruptly from 
the waters of the bay to a height of over one hundred 
feet, and is almost destitute of vegetation, the surface 
being principally solid rock. On the summit of the island 
is a massive, three-story brick citadel, in which reside the 
commander of the post and other officers. In addition to 



44 GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

the buildings occupied by the garrison is a military prison 
built of brick and stone, where are confined prisoners 
from different parts of the Military Division of the Pa- 
cific, who are mostly serving sentences for desertion or 
drunkenness. The fortifications comprise earthworks of 
a formidable character, the armament consisting of guns 
of large caliber, mounted in embrasures facing the Gold- 
en Gate and Angel Island. On the side of the island 
facing the city is a park of small artillery, used at present 
for saluting purposes. The steamer General McPherson 
leaves Washington Street wharf for Alcatraz, Angel 
Island, Fort Mason, and Fort Winfield Scott daily, ex- 
cept Saturdays, at G : 05 a. m. and 4 : 15 p. m. On Saturdays 
at 6:05 a. m., 1:30 and 3 p. m. Special trip Mondays and 
Thursdays at 11 a. m. Visitors must obtain a pass at the 
office on the wharf before going on board the steamer. 

Angel Island— Situated about two miles north of 
Alcatraz, is the largest island in the bay, being nearly 
three miles long by one mile wide. The military post is 
beautifully located in a small valley extending from the 
waters' edge to the heights above. The climate of the 
island is delightful, it being so situated as to escape the 
high winds and heavy fogs so prevalent in the city. It 
is a pleasant place of resort, there being fine graveled 
walks, and pretty gardens filled with choice flowers and 
shrubbery. The United States Government has con- 
structed a good road around the island, which is about 
eight miles in length, and affords a magnificent drive. 
Several living springs furnish an abundant supply of ex- 
cellent water. It is said that this place was, in early 
days, a favorite rendezvous for Spanish pirates, and at 
different times search has been made for treasure sup- 
posed to have been buried by them. The fortifications 
consist of several batteries, and others are now iu course 
of construction. Some quarries of excellent stone for 
certain purposes have been worked to a considerable 
extent. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 45 

Fort Mason, or Point San Jose— Is a military post 
situated on the bay-shore, near the foot of Van Ness Ave- 
nue. On the reservation, which comprises thirty-two 
acres, are barracks capable of accommodating two compa- 
nies of troops. The officers' quarters occupy a pretty site 
surrounded by trees and shrubs, and ornamented by beds 
of flowers. The fortifications consist of a barbette bat- 
tery mounting twelve guns of an old pattern, which 
would be of little service in repelling invasion. This lo- 
cality is also known as Black Point, a name given it in 
early days on account of the dark appearance of the 
bushes which then covered the promontory. The cars 
running from the corner of Washington Street and Mont- 
gomery Avenue pass within a short distance of the en- 
trance to the reservation. 

Fort Winfield Scott— Formerly called Fort Point, is 
situated on the southern shore of the Golden Gate, which 
at this point is about two miles wide. It is built of brick 
and granite, with three tiers or galleries, each supported 
on brick arches. There are ninety casemates, from 
which protrude the muzzles of guns of different kinds 
and caliber, completely covering the narrow entrance to 
the harbor. On the heights above the fort are extensive 
earthworks, well calculated, on account of their great 
strength and commanding situation, to sucessf ully resist 
the attack of a powerful fleet. These works are armed 
with several Rodman guns of large caliber, mounted on 
carriages, while others lie dismounted upon the ground. 
A good road extends from the fort up the hill skirting the 
earthworks to the Presidio. A drive over this road 
affords a magnificent view of the Golden Gate and Pa- 
cific Ocean. On a clear day the Farallon Islands, 
twenty-six mUes distant, can be seen. The fort can be 
reached by a pleasant drive through California Street to 
the corner of Lyon, thence by a road extending northerly 
to the Presidio, or by taking the cars which run from the 
corner of Washington Street and Montgomery Avenue to 



46 GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

the Presidio barracks, thence by a short walk through 
the reservation. 

Presidio — This is a United States military reservation, 
embracing a large area of ground, bounded on the north 
by the waters of the bay, and on the west by the Pacific 
Ocean. It was first occupied as a military post in 1776, 
by a detachment of Spanish troops under the command 
of Don Jose Moraga, who accompanied Friars Francisco 
Palou and Benito Cambon on their expedition from 
Monterey to establish the Mission Dolores. Three flags, 
the Spanish, Mexican, and American, have successively 
floated over it. It is the headquarters of the Commander 
of the Military Division of the Pacific. On the west side 
of the j)arade ground are the officers' quarters, consisting 
of a row of pretty cottages surrounded by gardens and 
green lawns, presenting an attractive appearance. Near 
at hand are other cottages occupied by privates and their 
families, and also barracks capable of accommodating a 
large number of troops. In tlie southern portion of the 
reservation is located the United States Marine Hospital. 
It can be reached by a good road extending from the 
corner of California and Lyon Streets, or by cars which 
leave every few minutes from the corner of \Yashington 
Street and Montgomery Avenue. 

LIGHTHOUSES AND FOG SIGNALS. 

Alcatraz — On Alcatraz Island, in the harbor of San 
Francisco. Fixed white ; 3rd order. Height of light above 
sea-level, one hundred and sixty-six feet. The fog signal 
is a bell struck by machinery four blows at intervals of 
nine seconds, followed by a pause of twenty-eight seconds. 

East Brother— On East Brother Island, off Point San 
Pablo. Fixed white; 4th order. Height of light above 
sea-level, sixty-two and a half feet. The fog signal is a 
twelve-inch steam-whistle, giving blasts of eight and four 
seconds with intervals of twenty-four seconds. 



GUroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 47 



Farallon— On the largest or south-east Farallon Is- 
land, oif entrance to San Francisco Bay. Flashing white 
every minute; 1st order. Height of light above sea-level, 
three hundred and sixty feet. The fog signal is a first- 
class steam-siren (in duplicate), giving blasts of five sec- 
onds at intervals of forty-five seconds. 

Fort Point— On the north-west bastion of the fort, 
south side of entrance to San Francisco Bay. Fixed 
white, for one minute, followed during next minute by 
a red flash every fifteen seconds ; 4th order. Height of 
light above sea-level, eighty-three feet. The fog signal is 
a bell struck by machinery every ten seconds. 

Mare Island— On extreme eastern end of Mare Island, 
at the entrance from San Pablo Bay to the Straits of Car- 
quinez. Fixed white; 4th order. Height of light above 
sea-level, seventy-six feet. The fog signal is a bell struck 
by machinery every ten seconds. 

Point Bonita— On the end of the point, north side of 
entrance to San Francisco Bay. Fixed white; 2nd order. 
Height of light above sea-level, one hundred and twenty- 
four feet. The fog signal is a first-class steam-siren (in 
duplicate), giving blasts of four seconds at intervals of 
thirty-five seconds. 

Yerba Buena— On south-east extremity of Yerba 
Buena, or Goat Island, in the harbor of San Francisco. 
Fixed white; oth order. Height of light above sea-level, 
ninety-seven feet. The fog signal is a ten-inch steam- 
whistle, g'iving blasts of four seconds at intervals of six- 
teen seconds. 

STATE COURTS, OFFICERS, ETC. 

Supreme Court of California. 

Sessions commence in San Francisco on the second 
Monday in January and the third Monday in July; in 
Los Angeles, on the first Monday in April and the second 
Monday in October; in Sacramento, on the first Monday 



48 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



in May and the second Monday in November; subject to 
changes by the Court. 

Robert F. Morrison, Chief Justice; Department No. 1 
E. W. McKiustry (presiding), S. B. McKee, E. M. Ross! 
Associate Justices; Department No. 2, J. D Tliornton 
(presiding). M. H. Myrick, J. R. Sbarpstein, Associate 
Justices. Court-rooms and Judges Chambers, 105 Stock- 
ton Street. 

State Officers. 

Assayer-J^OMis Falkenau. Office, 328 Montgomerv 
Street. ^ 

Bank Commissioners— J . E. Farnum, W. F. White J 
M.Litchfield. Office, 528 California Street. 

Fish Commissioners—^. R. Throckmorton, R H Buck- 
ingham, A. D. Dibble. Office, 401 California Street. 

Harbor Commissioners— WiWi^m Irwin, John H. Wise 
A. C. Paulsen. Office, 10 California Street. 

Immifiration Commissioner— Charles 1). Bunker Office 
508 Battery Street. 

Insurance Commissioner— J . C. Maynard. Office 401 
California Street. "^ ' 

Mineralo(jist—B.exirY G. Hanks. Office, 212 Sutter Street 

Pilot Commissioners— OMxex Eldridge, Joseph A Cool' 
idge, E. W. Travers. Office, Merchants' Exchange. 

Port Wardens — AxchiQ Harloe, George T. Bromley 
William Young, John Martin. Office, 525 Front Street. ' 

Railroad Commissioners— George J. Carpenter W P 
Humphreys, W. W. Foote. Office. 320 Sansome Street. 

Viticultural Commissioners— Ari^2i(\. Haraszthy, Charles 
A. Wetmore, Charles Krug, I. De Turk, R. b' Blowers 
George West, L. J. Rose, G. G. Blanchard, J. D. Shorb' 
Office, 111 Leidesdorff Street. 

California State Mining Bureau. 
Established by an act of the legislature approved April 
16th, 1880. The objects of the Bureau as set forth in the 
act are as follows : 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO A>'D VICINITY. 49 

There sliall be and is hereby establislied in this State a 
Mining Bureau, the principal office of which shall be 
maintained in the City of San Francisco, at which place 
there shall be collected by the State Mineralogist, and 
preserved for study and reference, specimens of all the 
geological and mineralogical substances, including min- 
eral waters found in this State, especially those possessing 
economic or commercial value, which specimens shall be 
marked, arranged, classified, and described, and a record 
thereof preserved, showing the character thereof and the 
place from whence obtained. The State Mineralogist 
shall also, as he has opportunity and means, collect, and 
in like manner preserve at said office, minerals, rocks, 
and fossils of other States, Territories, and countries, and 
the collections so made shall at all reasonable hours be 
open to public inspection, examination, and study. In 
addition to the collection, classification, arranging, and 
preservation of specimens, it shall be the duty of the 
State Mineralogist to make analytical assays as required; 
and when the funds in the Mining Bureau Fund are suf- 
ficient therefor, to provide and maintain a library of 
works on mineralogy, geology, and mining; to arrange in 
cases such specimens as he may collect : to procure and 
preserve models and drawings of mining machinery, and 
of milling machinery used in the reduction of ores; and 
obtain and preserve for public inspection and use such 
information respecting improvements in mining and min- 
ing machinery as will be of practical value to the people 
of this State. 

It is desired to make the ethnology of the Pacific Coast 
a feature of the Museum. All Indian relics, recent or 
prehistoric, will find a place, and their collection will no 
doubt throw much light on the ancient history of the State. 

The Bureau commences with a large and valuable do- 
nation of ores, rocks, fossils, reports, books, etc., the en- 
tire collection and property of the State Geological Society. 
Eooms, 212 Sutter Street. 



50 GCEDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Notaries Public. 

J. H. Blood, 3(>i Montgomery Street. 

"W. S. Campbell, 403 Montgomery Street. 

Edward Chattin, 442 California Street. 

A. J. Coffee, 515 California Street. 

W. P. Coleman, 307 Montgomery Street. 

Lee D. Craig, 316 Montgomery Street. 

A. C. Crane, 324^^ Montgomery Street. 

A. A. Enquist, 436 Montgomery Street. 

J. L. Fields, 313 ^Montgomery Street. 

J. F. Fugazi, 5 Montgomery Avenue. 

John E. Hamill, 329 Montgomery Street. 

William Harney, 410 California Street. 

L. B. Harris, 326 Pine Street. 

E. W. Hewitt, Presidio Keservation. 

"W. L. Higgins, Korth-east corner of Montgomery and 
California Streets. 

T. H. Holt, Korth-east corner of ^lontgomery and Cali- 
fornia Streets. 

C. H. Jackson, 526 Montgomery Street. 

E. Y. Joice, 425 California Street. 
C. E. Kelly, 216 Sansome Street. 
James L. King, 308 California Street. 

J. F. Kingwell, 500 Montgomery Street. 
George T. Knox, 444 California Street. 
Harris Lowenberg, 306 Montgomery Street. 
James Mason, 238 Montgomery Street. 
Louis Meinenger, 306 Montgomery Street. 
I. T. Milliken, 415 California Street. 

F. C. Mosebach, 333 Montgomerj^ Street. 
Samuel S. Murfej', 607 Montgomery Street. 
Otis V. Sawyer, 436 California Street. 
Holland Smith, 307 Montgomery Street. 

C. T. Stanley, 513 Montgomery Street. 
E. H. Tharp, 238 Montgomery Street. 
C. J. Torbert, North-east corner of Townsend and Fourth 
Streets. 



GUIDE TO SAK FRAyCtSCO AND VICINITY. 51 

F. O. Wegener, 40i Montgonisry Street. 
Charles D. Wheat, 501 California Street. 

MILITARY COMPANIES. .^ / 

J ■> ■> " 

'"• ' ■»• * 
National Guard of California— Commander in Chief, 

Governor George Stoneman; Adjutant-General, George \ 

B. Cosby. Headquarters, Sacramento. Commander of ; 
Division, Major-General Walter TurnbuU. Headquar- 
ters, 316 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

The following-named companies belonging to the Second 
Brigade, under the command of Brigadier-General W. H, 
Dimond, are located in San Francisco: 

First Infantry Eegewent — Col. John H. Dickinson 
Commanding. Company A, Armory, 312 Post Street; 
Company B, North-west corner of Howard and Xew 
Montgomery Streets; Company C, 322 Post Street; Com- 
pany D, North-west corner of Howard and New Montgom- 
ery Streets; Company E, North-west corner of Howard 
and New Montgomery Streets; Company F, 322 Post 
Street; Company G, 322 Post Street; Company H, North- 
west corner of Howard and New Montgomery Streets. 

Second Artillery Eege«ent— Col. W. R. Smedberg 
Commanding. Company A (Gatling Battery), Armory, 
South-east corner of Minna and New Montgomery Streets ; 
Company B (Light Battery), 519 Mission Street; Company 

C, 620 Bush Street; Company D, 620 Bush Street; Com- 
pany E, 519 Mission Street; Company F, South-west cor- 
ner of Sutter and Powell Streets; Company G, Souch-west 
corner of Sutter and Powell Streets; Company H, 620 
Bush Street; Cadet Company, 620 Bush Street. 

Cavalry — San Francisco Hussars (unattached). Ar- 
mory, South-east corner of Minna and New Montgomery 
Streets. 

Independent Companies— The follo^wing - named 
companies are not under the control of the State military 
authorities : 



52 GUIDE TO SAN FRAIsCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Austrian Military andBenevolent Association, Armory, 
310 O'Farrell Street.' ' ' 

California J^e^ers', 620 Busli Street. 

Eintraciit Rifle Section, 312 Post Street. 

Em'in at- Guard, 818 Howard- Street. 

Prench Zouaves, 808 Pacific Street. 

Garibaldi Guard, 423 Broadway Street. 

German Fusileer Guard, 620 Bush Street. 

Independent Rifles, 620 Bush Street. 

Italian Sharpshooters, 025 Broadway Street. 

Juarez Guard, 152-4 Stockton Street. 

Lafayette Guard, 730 Montgomery Street. 

Meaglier Guard, North-west corner of Howard and New 
Montgomery Streets. 

Montgomery Guard, North-west corner of Howard and 
New Montgomery Streets. 

Schuetzen Verein, 323 Turk Street. 

Shields Guard, North-west corner of Howard and New 
Montgomery Streets. • 

Stoneman Guard, North-west corner of Howard and 
New Montgomery Streets. 

Swiss Sharpshooters, 620 Bush Street. 

AVolf Tone Guard, North-west corner of Howard and 
New Montgomery Streets. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Almshouse, Mission Ocean House Road, near Laguna 
Honda. 

City Hall, South-east corner of McAllister and Larkin 
Streets. 

City Hall (old), Kearny Street between Washington 
and Merchant. 

County Hospital, Potrero Avenue between Twenty- 
second and T*wenty-third Streets. 

County Jail, Broadway Street between Kearny and 
Dupont. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 53 



Custom-house, North-west corner of Washington and 
Battery Streets. 

Hall of Records, New City Hall Grounds. 

House of Correction, Old San Jose Road near Old 
Ocean House Road. 

Industrial School, Old San Jose Road near Old Ocean 
House Road. 

Post-office, North-west corner of "Washington and Bat- 
tery Streets. 

Twenty -sixth Street Hospital (small-pox), De Haro 
Street near Colusa. 

United States Appraiser's Building, Sansome Street be- 
tween Washington and Jackson. 

United States Marine Hospital, Presidio Reservation. 

United States Mint, North-west corner of Mission and 
Fifth Streets. 

United States Treasury, 610 Commercial Street. 

BUrLDINGS AND BLOCKS. 

Academy Building, 330 Pine Street. > 

Anglo-Californian Bank Building, North-east corner of 
Sansome and Pine Streets, 

Arizona Block, South-west corner of Market and Main 
Streets. 

Armory Block, North-west corner of New Montgomery 
and Howard Streets. 

Astor Block, 625 Sacramento Street. 

Baldwin Hotel Block, North-east corner of Market and 
Powell Streets. 

Bancroft's Building, 721-725 Market Street. 

Bank of California Building, North-west corner of Cali- 
fornia and Sansome Streets. 

Bernis Building, 626 California Street. 

Brittan's Building, South-west corner of California and 
Davis Streets. 

Capital Building, 405 Kearny Street. 



54 GUIDE TO SAN FKANCISCO A>'D VICINITY. 

Central Block, South-east corner of Geary and Dupont 
Streets. 

Central Pacific R. R. Building, North-east corner of 
Fourth and Townsend Streets. 

Chronicle Building, Xorth-east corner of Kearny and 
Bush Streets. 

Cochituate Building, 215 Sansome Street. 

College Building, 24 Post Street. 

Commercial Block, South-east corner of California and 
Front Streets. 

Cosmopolitan Block, South-west corner of Sansome and 
Bush Streets. 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street. 

Cunningham's Block, South-east corner of Market and 
Second Streets. 

Dividend Building, North-west corner of Pine and 
LeidesdorfE Streets. 

Druid's Building, 413 Sutter Street. 

Duncan's Building, 411 J^ California Street. 

Eagle Block, North-west corner of Pine and Davis 
Streets. 

Fair's Building, South-west corner of Pine and Sansome 
Streets. 

Firemen's Fund Building, 401 California Street. 

Franklin Building, 406 California Street. 

Friedlander's Building, North-east corner of California 
and Sansome Streets. 

Golden Gate Block, 131 Post Street. 

Grand Hotel Block, South-east corner of Market and 
New Montgomery Streets. 

Grand Opera House Building, Mission Street between 
Third and Fourth. 

Halleck Block, 320 Sansome Street. 

Hansford Block, South-east corner of California and 
Davis Streets. 

Harpending Block, Market Street between Second and 
Ecker. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 55 

Hayward's Building, 415 California Street. 

Holbrook Block, South-east corner of Market and Beale 
Streets. 

Improved Order of Red Men's Building, 320 Post Street. 

Johnson's Building, 120 Sutter Street. 

Knights of Pythias Castle, 913 Market Street. 

Lick House Block, South-west corner of Montgomery 
and Sutter Streets. . 

London and San Francisco Bank Building, North-west 
corner of California and Leidesdorff Streets. 

Masonic Temple, I^orth-west corner of Montgomery and 
Post Streets. 

McCreery's Building, Xorth-east corner of Montgomery 
and Pine Streets. 

Mechanics' Institute Building, 27 Post Street. 

Mechanics' Institute Pavilion, Larkin Street between 
Hayes and Grove. 

Mercantile Library Building. 216 Bush Street. 

Merchants' Exchange, California Street between Mon t- 
gomery and Leidesdorff . 

Merritt's Building, Xorth-east corner of California and 
Drumm Streets. 

Metropolitan Block, 8-li Montgomery Avenue. 

Metropolitan Temple, Xorth-east corner of Fifth and 
Jessie Streets. 

Montgomery Block, Montgomery Street between Wash- 
ington and Merchant. 

Murphy, Grant & Co.'s Building, Xorth-east corner of 
Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Nevada Block, Xorth-west corner of Montgomery and 
Pine Streets. 

Xiantic Building, Xorth-west corner of Clay and San- 
some Streets. 

Nucleus Building, South-east corner of Market and 
Third Streets. 

Occidental Hotel Block, Montgomery Street between 
Sutter and Bush. 



56 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Odd Fellows Building, 325 Montgomery Street. 

Old Merchants' Exchange, North-east comer of "Wash- 
ington and Battery Streets. 

Olympic Building, 119 Post Street. 

Oriental Block, corner of Bush and Battery Streets. 

Pacific Bank Building, North-west corner of Pine and 
Sansome Streets. 

Pacific Exchange Building, 316 Montgomery Street. 

Palace Hotel Block, South-west corner of Market and 
New Montgomery Streets. 

Phelan's Building, Junction of Market and O'Farrell 
Streets. 

Phoenix Building, South-west corner of Jackson and 
Sansome Streets. 

Pioneers' Building, 808 Montgomery Street. 

Euss House Block, Montgomery Street between Bush 
and Pine. 

Safe Deposit Block, South-east corner of Montgomery 
and California Streets. 

San Francisco Savings Union Building, North-east cor- 
ner of California and Webb Streets. 

San Francisco Stock Exchange Building, Pine Street 
between Sansome and Montgomery. 

Savings and Loan Society Building, 617-621 Clay Street. 

Sherman's Building, North-east corner of Clay and 
Montgomery Streets. 

Shiels Building, .32 O'Farrell Street. 

St. Ann's Building, North-west corner of Eddy and 
Powell Streets. 

Stevenson's Building, South-west comer of California 
and Montgomery Streets. 

Sullivan's Building, South-west corner of Pacific and 
Dupont Streets. 

The Howard Building, North-west corner of Stockton 
and O'Farrell Streets. 

The Real Estate Associates' Building, 230 Montgomery 
Street. 



GUroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 57 

Thurlow Block, South-east corner of Sutter and Kearny 
Streets. 

Union Block, Junction of Market and Pine Streets. 

Virginia Block, North-west corner of f*acific and Stock- 
ton Streets. 

Washington Block, 1-17 Montgomery Avenue. 

"Webb's Building, 37 Second Street. 

Yankee Block, South-west corner of Pine and Front 
Streets. 

Young Men's Christian Association Building, 232 Sutter 
Street. 

HALLS. 

Alldacks, South-west corner of Bush and Devisadero 
Streets. 

Apollo, 808 Pacific Street. 

Arcade, Corner of Sixth and Clara Streets. 

Archery, 1155 Mission Street. 

Armory, 134 Fourth Street. 

Barra's, North-west corner of First and Minna Streets. 

B'nai B'rith, 121 Eddy Street. 

Bonanza, Ellis Street between Laguna and Buchanan. 

Cambrian, 1133 Mission Street. 

Cannon's, Corner of Howard and Seventeenth Streets. 

Carll's, 1328 Bush Street. 

Centennial, 421 Hayes Street. 

Central, North-east corner of Bush and Polk Streets. 

Champion, Butte Street between Tennessee and Ken- 
tucky. 

Charter Oak, 771 Market Street. 

Columbus, Stevenson Street near Third. 

Comerford's, Church Street near Twenty-seventh. 

Concordia, Mission Street near Fifth. 

Crusader, 1159 Mission Street. 

Dashaway, 139 Post Street. 

Docking's, 409 Montgomery Avenue. 

Druids, 413 Sutter Street. 



58 GUIDE TO SAN FRAJS'CISCO AND VICINITY. 

Eastern, 32 O'Farrell Street. 
Edward, Corner of Jersey and Sanchez Streets. 
Eintracht, 312 Post Street. 
Eureka Turn Verein, 706 Powell Street. 
Exempt Fire Company, Brenham Place near Clay Street. 
Faneuil, 751 Market Street. 
Fidelity, 218 Post Street. 
Florence, 246 Third Street. 

Franklin, South-east corner of Eddy and Pierce Streets. 
Fraternal, 1938 Sixteenth Street. 
Garibaldi, 423 Broadway Street. 
Golden Gate, 1622 Pacific Avenue. 
Grand Army Eepuhlic, 71 XewlVIontgomery Street. 
Grand Central, South-east corner of Market and Sixth 
Streets. 
Grand Western, 1328 Bush Street. 
Grangers, 40 California Street. 
Hamilton, 1517 Steiner Street. 
Hare's, Tenth Avenue, South San Francisco. 
Hibernia, 246 Third Street. 

Hoag's, South-west corner of Sutter and Powell Streets. 
Hopkins, Brannan between Sixth and Seventh. 
Horticultural, 305 Stockton Street. 
Huddy's, 909^4 Market Street. 

Humboldt, South-east corner of Mission and Erie Streets. 
Improved Order of Bed Men, 320 Post Street. 
Independence, 39 Fourth Street. 
Independent Order of Bed Men, 510 Bush Street. 
Irish-American, 818 Howard Street. 
Irish Confederation, 751 Market Street. 
Ixora, 737 Mission Street. 

Kessing's, Corner of Howard and Twenty-first Streets. 
King's, 2131 Mission Street. 
Knights of Pythias, 913 Market Street. 
Lafayette, 730 Montgomery Street. 
Laurel, 32 O'Farrell Street. 
Liberty, 861 Market Street. 



GUroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 59 



Lincoln, 71 Xew Montgomery Street. 

Lincoln, 413 Third Street. 

Longhead's, 1G05 Polk Street. 

Lunt's, 320 Post Street. 

Maennerbund, Potrero Avenue between Twenty-fourth 
and Tw-enty-tifth Streets. 

Masonic, ^'o^th-west corner of Montgomery and Post 
Streets. 

Mayberry's, 2419 Mission Street. 

Mechanics' Institute, 27 Post Street. 

Mechanics' Institute Pavilion, Larkin Street between 
Hayes and Grove. 

Mercantile Library, 216 Bush Street. 

Metropolitan Temple, Xorth-east corner of Fifth and 
Jessie Streets. 

Mission Music, Corner of Howard and Twenty-first 
Streets. 

Mo wry 's Opera, South-west corner of Grove and Laguna 
Streets. 

Myrtle, Railroad Avenue near Seventh Avenue, South 
San Francisco. 

National Armory, 324 Post Street. 

Odd Fellows, 325 Montgomery Street. 

Old Turn Yerein, 620 Bush Street. 

Ono, 1883 Mission Street. 

Philharmonic, Korth-east corner of Jackson and Stock- 
ton Streets. 

Pixley, 1534 Pacific Avenue. 

Piatt's, 216 Montgomery Street. 

Polk Street Music, 1605 Polk Street. 

Riggers and Stevedores, 429 Pacific Street. 

San Francisco Turn Yerein, 323 Turk Street. 

Sanders, 71 New Montgomery Street. 

Saratoga, 814 Geary Street. 

Scollay's, 1524 Stockton Street. 

Shiels, 32 O'Farrell Street. 

Social, 39 Fourth Street. 



60 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

St. Joseph's, Tenth Street between Howard and Folsom. 
St. Peter's, Alabama Street between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth. 
Tammany, Corner of Folsom and Eighth Streets. 
Temperance, 18% Eddy Street. 
Teutonia, 1322 Howard Street. 
Turn Yerein Vorwaerts, 310 O'Farrell Street. 
Union, Howard Street between Third and Fourth. 
Veterans', 516 Bryant Street. 
Washington, 35 Eddy Street. 
Western Addition Music, 2414 California Street. 
Young Men's Christian Association, 232 Sutter Street. 

SEA-WALL. 

Up to this date, April, 1883, there has been completed 
4,561 feet of sea-wall 200 feet in width, including live sec- 
tions, extending from Front Street to a point near the 
intersection of Powell and Jefferson Streets. The total 
cost of the five sections has been $894,671.56, or 6196.15 per 
lineal front foot. On the inner side of the wharf-facing 
of Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4, a macadam roadway has been 
constructed of the length of 4,000 feet, and of a width of 
40 feet. This was necessary for the purpose of travel, as 
the wharf-facing is exclusively devoted to the loading 
and discharging the freight of vessels. The construction 
of these sections has greatly relieved the pressure for room 
at the other wharves, and much of the grain business has 
been transferred to Sections 1 and 2, which are covered by 
a shed 2,000 feet in length by 100 feet in width. The reg- 
ulations of the Board of Harbor Commissioners in regard 
to the use of these sections and shed have proved a great 
convenience to the grain interests. Grain is landed there 
at a toll of five cents per ton, and is allowed to remain 
under the shed fifteen days without further charge, for 
removal or reshipment. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 61 



DRY-DOCKS. 

California, Hunter's Point, Soutli San Francisco. Of- 
fice, 318 California Street. 

Merchants', foot of Spear Street. Office, 318 California 
Street. 

CONSULS. 

Argentine Eepublic, Charles Baum, 510 Battery Street. 

Austro-Hungarian Empire, R, Hochkofier, 203 Front 
Street. 

Belgium, Wilfrid B. Chapman, 123 California Street. 

Boliyia, F. Herrera, 218 California Street. 

Brazil, F. "W. Luclovici vice-consul, 202 Bush Street. 

Chili, Juan de la Cruz Cerda consul-general, 506 Bat- 
tery Street. 

Chinese Empire, Wong Tsun Hsien consul-general, F. 
A. Bee consul, 917 Clay Street. 

Costa Rica (vacant). 

Denmark, Charles Wilson, 307 California Street. 

Ecuador, F. Herrera, 218 California Street. 

France, Auguste Vauvert de Mean, 701 Washington 
Street. 

German Empire, Adolph Rosenthal, 318 Sacramento 
Street. 

Great Britain (consul, vacant), Charles Mason vice- 
consul, 319 California Street. 

Greece, George T. Marye, Jr., 234 Montgomery Street. 

Guatemala, Louis B. Parrott, 306 California Street. 

Hawaiian Islands, H. W. Severance, 318 California 
Street. 

Honduras, F. Herrera (acting), 218 California Street. 

Italy, F. Lambertenghi, 506 Battery Street. 

Japan, Kentaro Yanagiya, 703 Market Street. 

Mexico, J. Carlos Mexia, 506 Battery Street. 

Netherlands, James DeFremery, 410 Battery Street. 



62 GULDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Nicaragua, F. Herrera, 218 California Street, 

Paraguay, P. J. Vaii Loben Sels, 530 California Street. 

Peru, F. de la Fuente y Subirat consul-general, Eugene 
De Sabla consular agent, 40 California Street. 

Portugal, Francis Berton, 527 Clay Street. 

Russia, Alexander E. Olarovsky consul-general, G. 
Niebaum vice-consul, 411^ California Street. 

Salvador, J. M. Tinoco, 506 Battery Street. 

Spain, Camilo Martin, 411 14 California Street. 

Sweden and Norway, Aug. Berggren, 406 Montgomery 
Street. 

Switzerland, F. Berton, 527 Clay Street. 

Turkey, George W. Gibbs, 33 Fremont Street. 

United States of Colombia, Francisco Marulanda, 41 
Montgomery Street. 

Uruguay, George L. Duval (acting), 40 California Street. 

Venezuela, F. Herrera, 218 California Street. 

BANKS AND BANKERS. 

Alfred Borel & Co., 601 Montgomery ^Street. 

Anglo-Calif ornian Bank, Xorth-east corner of Sansome 
and Pine Streets. 

Bank of British Columbia, South-east corner of Califor- 
nia and Sansome Streets. 

Bank of British North America, 221 Sansome Street. 

Bank of California, North-west corner of California and 
Sansome Streets. 

Belloc & Co., 524 Montgomery Street. 

California Savings and Loan Society, 1 Powell Street. 

Comptoir D'Escompte de Paris, C.JDe Guigne mana- 
ger, 412 Montgomery Street. 

Donohoe, Kelly & Co., South-east comer of Montgomery 
and Sacramento Streets. 

F. Berton & Co., 527 Clay Street. 

First National Gold Bank of San Francisco, 315 Mont- 
gomery Street. 



GUIDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 63 

French Savings and Loan Society, 534 California 
Street. 

German Savings and Loan Society, 526 California 
Street. 

Grangers' Bank of California, North-east corner of Cal- 
ifornia and Davis Streets. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, North-east corner 
of Market and Montgomery Streets. 

Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, 423 
California Street. 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society, 18 Geary Street. 

John Parrott, ill Montgomery Street. 

Lazard Freres, 205 Sansome Street. 

London and San Francisco Bank (limited), North-west 
corner of California and LeidesdorfE Streets. 

National Bank of Australasia, Hellmann Bros. & Co, 
agents, 525 Front Street. 

Nevada Bank of San Francisco, North-west corner of 
Montgomery and Pine Streets. 

Pacific Bank, North-west corner of Pine and Sansome 
Streets. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 California Street. 

Sather & Co., North-east corner of Montgomery and 
Commercial Streets. 

Savings and Loan Society, 619 Clay Street. 

Security Savings Bank, 215 Sansome Street. 

Sutro & Co., 408 Montgomery Street. 

Tallant & Co., 234 California Street. 

Union Bank of Australia, Hellmann Bros. & Co. agents, 
525 Front Street. 

Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Bank, North-east_ corner of Cali- 
fornia and Sansome Streets. 

CLEARING-HOUSE. 

San Francisco Clearing-House, Charles Sleeper mana- 
ger, 211 Sansome Street. 



64 GUEDE TO SAN FRA>-CISCO AND VICINITY. 



SAFE DEPOSITS. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., 326 Montgomery- 
Street. 

TELEGRAPH OFFICES. 

American District Telegraph, 222 Sansome Street; 
Branches : 205 Sutter, 961 Mission, 833 Sutter, 20(3 Market, 
1000 Market, Corner of Fourth and Townsend, corner of 
Mission and Twentieth, Corner of California and Fill- 
more, Corner of Hayes andLaguna, Corner of Powell and 
Union, and First Avenue, South S. F. 

Bay and Coast Telegraph Co., 222 Montgomery Street. 

California District Telegraph, 222 Montgomery Street. 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, Brenham Place near 
Clay Street. 

Gold and Stock Telegraph Co., 222 Sansome Street. 

Law Telegraph and Messenger Bureau, 444 California 
Street. 

San Francisco District Telegraph Co., 438 California 
Street; Branches: 202 Sutter, 326% Montgomery. 1100 
Market, and 1 Turk. 

Western Union Telegraph Co., 300 Montgomery Street; 
Branches : 833 Sutter, 961 Mission, 10 Market, 400 Front, 
206 Market, 205 Sutter, Palace Hotel, The Baldwin, Occi- 
dental Hotel, Comer of Fourth and Townsend, Corner of 
Hayes and Laguna, Corner of California and Fillmore, 
Ferry Landing foot of Market, and First Avenue, South 
S. F. 

TELEPHONE OFFICES. 

Pacific Bell Telephone Co., 222 Sansome Street. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

Anderson & Co. (Alameda and Oakland), 331 East 
Street. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 65 

Armstrong's (Alameda and Haywards), 1 Commercial 
Street. 

California Transfer Co., 222 Montgomery Street. 

City Transfer Co., 3 Post Street. 

City Transit Co., 9 Post Street. 

Gallagher's (Oakland), 309 East Street. 

Liud's (Alameda), 331 East Street. 

Oakland Parcel Delivery, Oakland Ferry. 

Oakland Transfer Co., 28 Market Street. 

Occidental Transfer Co. (Oakland and Berkeley), 3 Post 
Street. 

Overland Freight Transfer Co., King Street between 
Fourth and Fifth. 

Pacific Transfer Co., 110 Sutter Street. 

Standard Express Co. (Oakland and Fruit Yale), 1 Com- 
mercial Street. 

Steere & Colby (Oakland and Fruit Yale), 331 East 
Street. 

Telephone Transfer Co., 652 Market Street. 

Wells, Fargo & Co.'s (to all principal towns in the 
United States, Canada, Mexico, and Europe), 320 Sansome 
Street. 

"Whitney & Co.'s (Oakland and Alameda), 3 Commercial 
and 9 Post Street. 

CARRIAGE COMPANIES. 

City Cab and Carriage Co., ITi Jessie Street. 

Pacific Carriage Co., 11 Powell Street. 

United Carriage Co., 2 Xew Montgomery Street. 

STOCK BOARDS. 

Pacific Stock Exchange, 316 Montgomery Street, Ses- 
sions held daily for the purchase and sale of mining stocks 
at 9 A. M. and 11 a. m. and 3 p. m. Yisitors are admitted 
to the gallery during board hours. 



06 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY, 



San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, Pine Street 
between Sansome and Montgomery. Sessions held daily 
for the purchase and sale of mining stocks at 9:30 a. m., 
11 A. M., and 2:30 p. m. Sessions for the purchase and 
sale of local securities at 10:45 a. m. and 2: 15 p. m. Visit- 
ors can gain admittance to the gallery by procuring a card 
of admission from one of the members. 

The Stock and Bond Exchange, Room 22 Merchants' 
Exchange, second floor. Sessions held daily for the pur- 
chase and sale of U. S. bonds and local securities at 10:30 
A. M. and 2 p. m. Visitors can gain admittance by pro- 
curing a card of admission from one of the members. 

PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 

San Francisco Produce Exchange, 302 Davis Street. 
Meets daily at 10:30 a. m. Call Board meets daily at 
11 : 15 A. M. and 3 p. m. Visitors can gain admittance by 
procuring a card of admission from one of the members. 

GRAIN EXCHANGE. 

San Francisco Grain Exchange, Rooms San Francisco 
Stock and Exchange Building, Pine Street between San- 
some and Montgomery. Sessions held daily, except Sat- 
urdays, at 1 : 30 p. M. On Saturdays at 10 : 15 a. m. 

LAND OFFICES. 

Central Pacific Railroad, Xorth-east corner of Fourth 
and Townsend Streets. 

Southern Pacific Railroad, North-east corner of Fourth 
and Townsend Streets. 

United States, 610 Commercial Street. 

University of California, Land Department, 310 Pine 
Street. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 67 



WATER WORKS. 

The city is furnished with an abundant supply of excel- 
lent water by the Spring Valley Water Works. The 
principal source of supply is the peninsula, where the 
company controls a watershed of about twenty-eight 
square miles. The water from this shed is collected in 
three storage reservoirs, viz., the Pilarcitos, the San An- 
dreas, and the Crystal Springs, which will hold in the 
aggregate 12,000,000,000 gallons. From these the water is 
conducted in iron pipes thirty-six inches in diameter to 
the Lake Honda and College Hill reservoirs, and from 
thence to three distributing reservoirs in the city, viz., 
the Clay Street, Francisco Street, and Russian Hill. 
From the distributing reservoirs the water flows through 
cast-iron pipes, varying in diameter from sixteen inches 
to four inches. The company also obtain from Lobos 
Creek about 2,000,000 gallons daily. If during very dry 
seasons an additional supply is needed, it can be obtained 
from Lake Merced by means of pumping works. The 
company have also acquired water rights in Calaveras 
Valley, and from this source can increase their supply so 
as to enable them to furnish a sufficient quantity of 
water for 5,000,000 inhabitants, it having a watershed of 
about two hundred and fifty square miles, which is the 
next nearest source of supply to its present works that 
exists. Office, 516 California Street. 

GAS V70RKS. 

Central Gas Co. Works, King Street between Second 
and Third. Office, 843 Market Street. 

San Francisco Gas Light Co. Works, Corner of Howard 
and Fremont Streets, Corner of Howard and Fifth, Cor- 
ner of King and Second, Corner of Tenth and Channel, 
and foot of Humboldt, Potrero. Office, South-east corner 
of First and Natoma Streets. 



68 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANY. 

Many of the principal streets are illuminated to a cer- 
tain extent by the Brush Electric Light, which is furnished 
by the California Electric Light Co. Office and works, 
220-226 Jessie Street. 



CHURCHES. 

From the founding of the Mission Dolores in the year 
1776, until the year 1849, the only house of worship 
erected on the site of San Francisco was the old adobe 
edifice which still stands on the corner of Sixteenth and 
Dolores Streets. The first step taken to establish a Prot- 
estant Church was in 1846, when a religious society, com- 
posed of the members of several families, was organized 
through the exertions of the Eev. W. Roberts of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. The next movement in 
this direction was in May, 1847, when a meeting was 
called for the i^urpose of organizing a religious congrega- 
tion, and erecting a place of worship. But little, how- 
ever, was accomplished by those interested in this work 
until 1849, when the following churches were organized, 
viz. : First Methodist Episcopal, First Presbyterian, First 
Baptist, First Congregational, and two Episcopalian, the 
Trinity and Grace. During the year there was also or- 
ganized another Eoman Catholic Church, called the St. 
Francis. At the present time almost every denomina- 
tion known throughout the civilized world is represented 
by one or more places of worship, some of which will in 
size and beauty compare favorably with many in larger 
cities. Among the latter may be mentioned the First 
Congregational, Calvary Presbyterian, Grace Cathedral, 
First Unitarian, St. Ignatius, St. Patrick's, and the Syn- 
agogue of Congregation Emanu-El. 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 69 

Baptist. 

First — Eddy Street between Jones and Leavenworth. 

Third (colored)— Powell Street between Bush and 
Sutter. 

Fifth— Twenty-second Street between Howard and 
Capp. 

Metropolitan — Xorth-east corner of Fifth and Jessie 
Streets. 

Union Square— Post Street between Powell and Mason. 

Zion— Laguna Street between Golden Gate Avenue and 
McAllister. 

Baptist Mission Chapel— Eleventh Avenue between F 
and G Streets, South S. F. 

Congregational. 

First — South-east corner of Post and Mason Streets. 
Third — Fifteenth Street between Valencia and ^Mission. 
Bethany— Bartlett Street near Twenty-fifth. 
Green Street— Green Street between Stockton and Pow- 
ell. 
Plymouth— Post Street near Webster. 

Episcopal. 

Trinity— North-east corner of Post and Powell Streets. 

Q-race- South-east corner of California and Stockton 
Streets. 

Church of the Advent- Howard Street between Second 
and Third. 

St. John's— Xorth-east corner of Fifteenth and Valencia 
Streets. 

St. Luke's— Pacific Avenue near Polk Street. 

St. Paul's— California Street between Fillmore and 
Steiner. 

St. Peter's— Xorth-east corner of Stockton and Filbert 
Streets. 



70 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



St. Stephen's— Fulton Street between Webster and Fill- 
more. 

St. Albans— Cambrian Hall, 1133 Mission Street. 
All Saints— Corner of Eddy and Polk Streets. 
Seamen's Mission— 118 Jackson Street. 

Evangelical Lutheran. 

St. Mark's (German)— Geary Street between Stockton 
and Powell. 

St. Paul's (German)— Mission Street between Fifth and 
Sixth. 

St. John's (German)— North-east corner of Stockton and 
Filbert Streets. 

St. Matthew's (German)— Alabama Street near Twenty- 
fourth. 

Emanuel (German)— Jessie Street between Sixth and 
Seventh. 

Our Saviour's (Scandinavian)— Sherman Street near Fol- 
som. 

French Reformed— Powell Street between Sutter and 
Bush. 

Hebre^w. 

Congregation Emanu-El— Sutter Street between Stock- 
ton and Powell. 

Congregation Ohabai Shalome— Mason Street between 
Geary and Post. 

Congregation Sherith Israel— North-east corner of Post 
and Taylor Streets. 

Congregation Beth Israel— Turk Street near Taylor. 

Congregation Shaarey Tzedek— Stockton Street between 
Broadway and Yallejo. 

Congregation Xavah Tzedek— Golden Gate Avenue 
near Taylor. 

Congregation Beth Menahim Streisand— Mission Street 
between Fifth and Sixth. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 71 



Methodist Episcopal. 

First — Powell Street between Washington and Jackson. 

Howard Street — Howard Street between Second and 
Third. 

Central— Mission Street between Sixth and Seventh. 

Grace— Mission Street between Eighteenth and Nine- 
teenth. 

Bush Street — Bush Street between Scott and Devisadero. 

St. Paul's (M. E. South)— Euss Street between Howard 
and Folsom. 

South San Francisco — Fifteenth Avenue near P Street. 

Kentucky Street— Tennessee Street near Solano. 

Twenty-seventh Street — Twenty-seventh Street be- 
tween Church and Sanchez. 

Hayes Yalley — Corner of Laguna and Grove Streets. 

German— Folsom Street between Fourth and Fifth. 

St. Paul's (German) — Broadway Street between Stock- 
ton and Powell. 

Scandinavian — Harrison Street between Fifth and 
Sixth. 

African— Powell Street between Jackson and Pacilic. 

African Zion — Stockton Street between Clay and Sac- 
ramento. 

Presbyterian. 

First — Corner of Van jSTess Avenue and Sacramento 
Street. 

Calvary— North-west corner of Geary and Powell 
Streets. 

Howard — Mission Street between Third and Fourth. 

St. John's— Post Street between Mason and Taylor. 

Central— Golden Gate Avenue between Taylor and 
Jones. 

First United— Mason Street between Eddy and Ellis. 

Howard Street— Howard Street between Twenty-first 
and Twenty-second. 



72 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Larkin Street — Corner of Larkin and Pacific Streets. 

AYoodbridge — Xortli-west corner of Twentietli and 
Capp Streets. 

Westminster — Fell Street between Octavia and Laguna. 

Olivet — Tennessee Street between Sierra and Napa. 

Memorial — Corner of Eighteenth and Railroad Ave- 
nues, South S. F. 

Hamilton Square — Hamilton Hall, 1517 Steiner Street. 

Emanuel — Harrison Street between Fifth and Sixth . 

Welsh— Cambrian Hall, 1133 Mission Street. 

Pacific Presbyterian Union— This society has estab- 
lished several Sabbath-schools which meet every Sunday 
as follows: First Street School, Barra's Hall, North-west 
corner of First and Minna Streets; Hamilton Square 
School, Hamilton Hall, 1517 Steiner Street; Xoe Valley 
School, Corner of Jersey and Sanchez Streets; Pacific 
Street School, Pacific Street between Mason and Powell. 

Roman Catholic. 

Mission Dolores — South-west corner of Sixteenth and 
Dolores Streets. 

St. Francis' — North-east corner of Yallejo Street and 
Montgomery Avenue. 

St. Patrick's— Mission Street between Third and Fourth. 

St. Ignatius' — North-west corner of Hayes Street and 
Van Ness Avenue. 

St. Mary's— North-east corner of California and Dupont 
Streets. 

St. Joseph's— Tenth Street between Howard and Fol- 
som. 

St. Peter's— Columbia Street between Twenty-fourth 
and Twenty-fifth. 

St. John the Baptist— Eddy Street between Laguna and 
Octavia. 

St. Dominic's — North-west corner of Bush and Steiner 
Streets. 

St. Paul's — Corner of Church and Twentv-ninth Streets. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 73 

St, Bridget's— South-west corner of Broadway Street 
and Van Xess Avenue. 

St. Rose's— Brannan Street near Fourth. 

St. Boniface's (German) — Golden Gate Avenue between 
Jones and Leavenworth. 

Notre Dame des Victoires (French)— Bush Street be- 
tween Dupont and Stockton. 

Yglesia de Nuestra Sefiora de Guadalupe (Spanish and 
Italian)— Broadway Street between Mason and Taylor. 

Church of the Holy Cross— Calvary Cemetery, entrance 
corner of Geary Street and Central Avenue. 

Convents— Presentation, Powell Street near Greenwich; 
Sacred Heart Presentation, South-west corner of Ellis and 
Taylor Streets; Notre Dame, Dolores Street near Six- 
teenth; Convent Most Holy Names, Tenth Street near 
Howard; St. Dominic's Monastery, North-west corner of 
Bush and Steiner Streets; St. Peter's, Alabama Street 
near Twenty-fourth; St. Rose's, Golden Gate Avenue 
near Steiner Street. 

Swedenborgiau. 

First New Jerusalem— O'Farrell Street between Mason 
and Taylor. 

Unitarian. 

First— Geary Street between Dupont and Stockton. 

Miscellaneous. 

The Mariners— North-east corner of Sacramento and 
Drumm Streets. 

Dutch Reformed— Eleventh Street between Market and 
Mission. 

Second Advent Christian— Eddy Street between Taylor 
and Jones. 

Seventh Day Adventists— Laguna Street near McAl- 
lister. 



74 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Swedish — Services held in the Church of the Advent, 
Howard Street near Second. 

Russian — 1713 Powell Street. 

Friends Meeting — Superior Court Room No, 10, New 
City Hall. 

Christian Church — Young Men's Christian Association 
Building, 232 Sutter Street. 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints — Lincoln Hall, 71 New Montgomery Street. 

Independent German Congregation of San Francisco — 
310 O'Farrell Street. 

First Spiritual Union — Ixora Hall, 737 Mission Street. 

Progressive Spiritualists— Washington Hall, 35 Eddy 
Street. 

CHINESE MISSIONS. 

Several religious denominations have established mis- 
sions in San Francisco with the object of converting and 
educating the Chinese. The Methodists and Presbyter- 
ians have each erected commodious edifices, fitted up 
with school-rooms and chapels, and also rooms for the 
accommodation of the missionaries in charge; while other 
denominations have rented rooms for that purpose. Re- 
ligious services in the Chinese language are held every 
Sunday, and in connection with these are Sabbath-schools 
and Bible Classes. Schools for instruction in the English 
language are open every evening during the week. 

Baptist — 740 Washington Street. 

Congregational— 5 Brenham Place and 8 Ridley Street. 

Methodist — 916 "Washington Street. 

Presbyterian— North-east corner of Sacramento and 
Stockton Streets. 

ASSOCIATIONS AND SOCIETIES. 

Among the societies organized in this city for religious, 
benevolent, scientific, and other purposes, are many of a 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY,- 75 



high character, through whose efforts much has been 
done to advance the cause of religion and temperance, 
relieve the wants of the sick and destitute, and dissemi- 
nate valuable information. Several societies, including 
the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Druids, 
Red Men, B'nai B'rith, etc., have handsome and commo- 
dious halls, fitted up with nicely furnished lodge-rooms, 
libraries, and reading-rooms for the convenience of their 
members. Almost every nation in the civilized world is 
represented in this city by a society for the relief of their 
sick and destitute countrymen. Two of these, the French 
and German Benevolent Societies, have erected commo- 
dious hospitals, where the sick are attended to by skillful 
physicians. In addition to those organized for purposes 
enumerated above, there are protective societies of every 
kind, as well as social organizations too numerous to 
mention. 

Following will be found a list of the most prominent 
associations and societies in San Francisco, with time and 
place of meeting, etc, 

American Legion of Honor— Grand Council of Cali- 
fornia, organized August, 1881. Meets annually on the 
third Tuesday of April. Mrs. Abbie E. Wood, Grand 
Secretary. Office, 32 O'Farrell Street. Fifteen Subordi- 
nate Councils have been organized in San Francisco. 

American Protestant Association — Organized 
January, 1866. Grand Lodge of California, meets annual- 
ly in San Francisco, on the first Monday in December. 
J. D. Coulie, District Deputy Grand Master. Office, 213 
Fremont Street, Five Subordinate Lodges have been 
organized in San Francisco, 

Ancient Order of Foresters— Organized December, 
1874. District of California, meets first Mondays in Janu- 
ary, April, July, and October, at Druids Hall, il3 Sutter 
Street. Frederick C. Hensley, District Secretary. Of- 
fice, 530 Washington Street. Eleven Courts have been 
organized in San Francisco. 



76 GUIDE TO 8AN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 

Ancient Order of Hibernians— Organized March, 
1869. The Board of Directors meets on the 20th of each 
month, at Irish-American Hall, 818 Howard Street. 
J. C. O'Connor, State Secretary. Office, 767 Mission 
Street. Eight Divisions have been organized in San 
Francisco. 

Ancient Order of United Workmen— Grand T^odge 
of California, organized Xovember, 1877, meets annually 
in San Francisco on the first Tuesday in April. H. G. 
Pratt, Grand Recorder. Office, St. Ann's Building, 
North-west corner of Eddy and Powell Streets. Twenty- 
three Subordinate Lodges have been organized in San 
Francisco. 

Austrian Benevolent Society— Organized Septem- 
ber, 1870. Meets first and third Fridays of each month 
at 71 New Montgomery Street. 

Bar Association of San Francisco— Organized 
April, 1872. Objects: To maintain the honor and dignity 
of the profession of the law, to increase its usefulness in 
promoting the due administration of justice, and to culti- 
vate social intercourse among its members. Rooms, 634 
Sacramento Street. 

Board of Pharmacy— Organized 1872. Meets third 
Thursday of each month at the College of Pharmacy, 
Fulton Street near Van Ness Avenue. John H. Dawson, 
Secretary. 

Board of Trade— Organized April, 1877. Annual 
meeting first Monday in February. Board of Directors 
meets every Friday. H. L. Smith, Secretary. Rooms, 
202 Market Street. 

Bohemian Club— Organized April, 1872. This is an 
association of gentlemen connected professionally with 
literature, art, music, the drama, as well as those who by 
reason of their love or appreciation of these objects may 
be deemed eligible. Club Rooms, 430 Pine Street. 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society— Organized Septem- 
ber, 1874. This society rescues homeless, neglected, or 



OUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 77 

abused children; provides for such in its own quarters 
until suitable homes or employment are found for them; 
and also maintains reading-rooms, libraries, baths, a 
gymnasium, etc., for their benefit. Lodgings are fur- 
nished at a nominal cost to working boys and girls who 
have neither homes nor suitable guardianship in the city. 
The work is free from sectarianism, and depends upon 
voluntary contributions for its support. E. T. Dooley, 
Superintendent. Home, 68 Clementina Street. 

British Benevolent Society of California— Organ- 
ized May, 1865. Objects: To relieve sick and destitute 
natives of Great Britain, and to create and maintain a 
fund for charitable purposes. A reading-room is main- 
tained for the use of its members, and strangers visiting 
the city when introduced by members. J. P. McCurrie, 
Secretary. Kooms, 531 California Street. 

Caledonian Club— Organized November, 1866. Ob- 
jects : The encouragement and practice of the games and 
preservation of the customs and manners of Scotland, and 
the promotion of a taste for her language and literature. 
Meets first and third Fridays of each month at 32 O'Far- 
rell Street. 

California Academy of Sciences— Organized in 
April, 1853. Stated meetings held first and third Mon- 
days of each month. On these evenings lectures are 
given or papers on scientific subjects read by members. 
The museum of the society contains scientific collections 
of great value, to which additions are constantly being 
made. What is known as the Crocker-Stanford collection 
is now on exhibition at the Mercantile Library Hall. A 
library is also maintained, which numbers among its vol- 
umes many valuable works. Charles G. Yale, Recording 
Secretary. Office, 414 Clay Street. Hall of the Academy, 
South-west corner of California and Dupont Streets. 

California Historical Society— Organized July, 
1870. Objects : To disseminate knowledge by the publi- 
cation of documents relating to the history, antiquities. 



78 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

and etbuography of the west coast of America. Ralph 
C. Harrison, Secretary. Office, 230 Montgomery Street. 
Rooms, 323 California Street. 

California Pharmaceutical Society and College 
of Pharmacy — Meetings held quarterly on the second 
Thursdays in January, April, July, and October. Lec- 
tures given for a term of five months, commencing the 
first Tuesday in April, at the college on Fulton Street, 
near Van Ness Avenue, F. Grazer, Secretary. Office, 
South-west corner of Sixth and Folsom Streets. 

California Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children— Incorporated September, 1876. Meets 
first Wednesday of each month. Nathaniel Hunter, 
Secrerary. Office, 614 Merchant Street. 

California State Geological Society— Incorpo- 
rated December, 1876. Objects: To encourage the study 
of geology in all its branches. Meets first and third 
Tuesdays of each month at 212 Sutter Street. 

Cambrian Mutual Aid Society— Organized March, 
1869. This is an association of Welsh residents, organ- 
ized for benevolent purposes. Meets second Monday of 
each month at Cambrian Hall, 1133 Mission Street. 

Canadian Association — Organized March, 1877. 
Meets second Tuesday of each month at B'nai B'rith 
Hall, 121 Eddy Street. A. Gilliland, Secretary. Office, 
313 California Street. 

Chamber of Commerce — Organized April, 1850. 
Meets third Tuesdays in January, April, July, and Octo- 
ber. The library contains nine hundred and twenty-four 
volumes, eighteen hundred and twenty-two pamphlets, 
and forty-nine maps and charts. Morris Marcus, Sec- 
retary, Treasurer, and Librarian. Office, 26 Califor- 
nia Street. Rooms, Merchants' Exchange, second 
floor. 

Champions of the Red Cross— Supreme Council, 
organized October, 1874. Meets annually in San Fran- 
cisco on the third Tuesday in April. George B. Hudson, 



GUIDE TO SAII FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 79 

Supreme Secretary. Three Encampments have been 
organized in San Francisco. 

Danish Society Norden — Organized July, 1873. 
Meets second Tuesdays of each month. Rooms, 739 
Howard Street. 

Dashaway Association— Organized January, 1859. 
This society maintains the Home for the Care of the Ine- 
briate. Business meetings held every Tuesday evening. 
On Sunday evenings interesting literary and musical en- 
tertainments are given . Hall, 139 Post Street. 

Eureka Benevolent Society— Organized October, 
1850. Objects: To assist needy Hebrews, and create a 
fund for the siipport of widows and orphans. Board of 
Trustees meets first Monday of each month. Leo Eloes- 
ser, Secretary. Office, 414 Clay Street. 

Eureka Turn Verein— Organized October, 1863. Reg- 
ular meetings first Wednesday of each month. The Hall, 
located at 706 Powell Street, is open every evening from 
8 to 10 o'clock. 

Exempt Fire Company— Organized December, 1862. 
Meets on the third Monday of each month. Hall, Bren- 
ham place near Clay Street. 

Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Benevo- 
lent Society— Organized May, 1869. Meets every Sun- 
day and Friday. On Sunday evenings literary and 
musical entertainments are given. Rooms, 818 Howard 
Street. 

Free and Accepted Masons— Grand Lodge of the 
State of California, organized April, 1850. Meets annually 
in San Francisco on the second Tuesday in October. 
Alexander G. Abell, Grand Secretary. Office, Masonic 
Temple, North-west corner of Post and Montgomery 
Streets. Sixteen Subordinate Lodges, with an aggregate 
membership of about two thousand five hundred, have 
been organized in San Francisco. 

Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the State 
OF California— Meets annually in San Francisco on the 



80 GUIDE TO SAX FKANCI8C0 A>rD VICINITY. 

second Tuesday in April. Thomas H. Caswell, Grand 
Secretary. Office, Masonic Temple. Two Subordinate 
Chapters have been organized in San Francisco. 

Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the 
State of California— Meets annually in San Francisco 
on the second Thursday in April. Thomas H. Caswell, 
Grand Recorder. Office, Masonic Temple. One Subor- 
dinate Council has been organized in San Francisco. 

Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of the 
State of California — Meets annually in San Francisco 
on the second Friday in April. Thomas H. Caswell, 
Grand Recorder, Office, Masonic Temple. Two Subor- 
dinate Commanderies have been organized in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Grand Consistory of the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite— Meets annually in San Francisco on the 
second Wednesday in January. One Chapter, one Coun- 
cil, and one Lodge have been organized in San Francisco. 

Masonic Board of Relief — Composed of all the W. 
M.'s of the Subordinate Lodges of San Francisco. Meets 
every Saturday evening at Masonic Temple. 

Masonic Veteran Association — Objects : The union of 
the pioneer Masons of the Pacific Coast, and the preser- 
vation of Masonic history. Edwin A. Sherman, Secretary. 
Meets at the Masonic Temple. 

French Benevolent Society— Organized December, 
1851. Central Pharmacy of Society, open daily except 
Sunday from 1 to 5 p. m. E. Larthe, Secretary. Rooms, 
510 Jackson Street. 

Geographical Society of the Pacific— Organized 
March, 1881. Meets second and fourth Tuesdays of each 
month. C. Mitchell Grant, Secretary. Rooms, 411 Post 
Street. 

German General Benevolent Society— Organized 
January, 1854. Eugene Roemer, General Agent. Office 
open daily from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., 535 California Street. 

Grand Army of the Republic— Organized January, 



GUIDE TO SAN FRAXCISCO AND VICIKITY. 81 



1867. George M. McCarty, Assistant Adjutant-General 
Department of California. Office, 31 Post Street. Five 
Posts have been organized in San Francisco. 

Immigration Association of California— Incorpor- 
ated November, 1881. Objects: To encourage immigra- 
tion into California; to furnish reliable information in 
reference to lauds, climate, etc.; and assist immigrants in 
various ways. C. H. Street, Secretary and Land Officer. 
Office, 10 California Street, 

Improved Order of Red Men— Great Council, organ- 
ized July, 1867. Meets annually first Tuesday in August. 
H. S. Winn, Great Chief of Records. Office, 122 Geary 
Street. Hall, 320 Post Street. Eight Tribes and one De- 
gree Council have been organized in San Francisco. 

Independent Order B'nai B'rith — District Grand 
Lodge No. 4 meets annually in San Francisco on the 
fourth Sunday in January. I^ouis Blank, Secretary. 
Office, B'nai B"rith Hall, 121 Eddy Street. Nine Subordi- 
nate Lodges have been organized in San Francisco. 

Independent Order Odd Fellows— Grand Lodge of 
the State of California, organized May, 1853. Meets an- 
nually in San Francisco (unless otherwise ordered) on the 
second Tuesday in May. W. B. Lyon, Grand Secretary. 
Office, Odd Fellows Hall, 325 Montgomery Street. Twen- 
ty-five Subordinate Lodges, one Degree Ix)dge, and three 
Rebekah Degree Lodges have been organized in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Grand Encampment— Meets annually in San Francisco 
on the Third Tuesday in October. W. B. Lyon, Grand 
Scribe. Office, Odd Fellows Hall. Five Subordinate 
Encampments have been organized in San Francisco. 

General Relief Committee— Composed of all Noble 
Grands and Vice-Grands of the Subordinate Lodges in 
San Francisco. Meets every Sunday at 10 o'clock a. m., 
at Odd Fellows Hall. 

Odd Fellows' Veteran Association— VT. H. Barnes, 
Secretary. Objects : The preservation of the history and 



82 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



traditions of Odd Fellowship. Office, Odd Fellows 
Hall. 

Independent Order of Chosen Friends of the Pa- 
cific Coast— Grand Council, organized December, 1881. 
Meets annually in San Francisco on the first Monday in 
May. Isaac L. Lang, Grand Secretary. Office, St. Ann's 
Building, North-west corner of Powell and Eddy Streats. 
Eighteen Subordinate Councils have been organized in 
San Francisco. 

Independent Order of Good Templars— Grand 
Lodge, organized May, 1860. Meets annually on the first 
Tuesday in October. George B. Katzenstein, Grand Sec- 
retary. Office, Sacramento City. Twelve Subordinate 
Tx)dges have been organized in San Francisco. 

Independent Order of Red Men— Gross Stamm of 
California, organized July, 184G. Meets annually on the 
last Monday in July. Samuel Polack, Grand Secretary. 
Office, 516 Kearny Street. Hall, 510 Bush Street. Five 
Subordinate Stamms and one Lager have been organized 
in San Francisco. 

Irish- American Benevolent Society — Organized 
May, 1860. Meets first and third Mondays of each month 
at Irish-American Hall, 818 Howard Street. 

Italian Benevolent Society — Organized October, 
1858. Meets every Saturday. B. Moron, Secretary. Booms, 
423 "Washington Street. 

Knights of Honor-Grand Lodge of California, organ- 
ized March, 1880. Meets annually on the second Wednes- 
day in April. W. H. Mahony, Grand Eeporter. Office, 
45 St. Ann's Building. Twenty-one Subordinate Lodges 
have been organized in San Francisco. 

Knights of Pythias— Grand Lodge of California, or- 
ganized September, 1869. Meets annually on the second 
Tuesday in April. John H. Harney, Grand Keeper of 
Eecords and Seals. Hall, 913 Market Street. Nineteen 
Subordinate Lodges have been organized in San Fran- 
cisco. 



GUroE TO SAJf FRANCISCO AKD VICINITY. 83 



Ladies' Protection and Relief Society— Organized 

August, 1853. Objects : To maintain a Home where friend- 
less and destitute girls and boys may be received and 
provided for until permanent homes in respectable fami- 
lies can be secured for them. A fine and commodious 
edifice has been erected by the society on Franklin Street 
between Post and Geary. 

Ligue Nationale Francaise — Incorporated July, 
1876. Objects: To cement the ties of friendship among 
French residents, and by the cultivation of patriotic sen- 
timent and love for their native land aid in re-establishing 
the national grandeur. The society has a library of twelve 
thousand volumes, which contains many valuable works 
in the French language. The rooms, located at 120 Sutter 
Street, are open daily from 12 m. to 6 p. m. and from 7 : 30 

to 10 p. M. 

Little Sisters' Infant Shelter— Organized 1871. The 
object of this society is to provide care and instruction 
for little children whose parents are called from home to 
their work; also purposes of benevolence. The Kinder- 
garten connected with the institution has an average 
daily attendance of forty pupils. Visitors are admitted 
to the Shelter, located at 512 JSHnna Street, every day ex- 
cept Fridays and Saturdays. 

Mechanics' Institute— Organized March, 1855. The 
objects of this association are the dissemination of infor- 
mation and useful knowledge by the establishment of a 
library, museum, and reading-room, the formation of 
classes, and delivery of lectures for tuition, the collection 
of a cabinet, scientific apparatus, works of art, etc. The 
library, numbering thirty-three thousand volumes, con- 
tains many valuable works. Any person of good charac- 
ter can become a member by paying an entrance fee of 
one dollar, and one dollar and fifty cents dues, quarterly 
in advance. Any non-resident of good character will 
be permitted the privileges of the Institute on the pay- 
ment of fifty cents per month in advance. The rooms, 



84 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AXD VICINITY. 



located at 27 Post Street, are open from 9 a. m. to 10 
p. M. 

Merchants' Exchange Association — Organized 
June, 1860. Board of Trustees meet on the 10th of each 
month. General commercial and shipping news from all 
parts of the world is posted in tlie Exchange as soon as 
received. The rooms, located in the Merchants' Ex- 
change Building, are open from 7 a. m. to 10 p. m. Change 
hours, from 1 to 2 p. m. 

Military Order Loyal Legion— Organized May, 1871. 
Meets annually on the first Wednesday in May. Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. R. Smedberg, Recorder. Office, 
316 California Street. 

Netherlands Benevolent Association— Organized 
January, 1874. Meets first Wednesday of each month at 
the junction of Market and Sutter Streets. A. P. DeWit, 
Secretary. Office, 532 California Street. 

Olympic Club— Organized May, 1860. This club oc- 
cupies elegant and commodious quarters, built especially 
for them, at 119 Post Street. Tlie gymnasium, and read- 
ing, billiard, and chess rooms, are all elaborately fitted up 
with everything necessary for the recreation and conve- 
nience of the members. Instruction in gymnastics, box- 
ing, and fencing are given by experienced teachers at 
certain hours during the day and evening. Rooms open 
daily from 8 o'clock a. m. until midnight. 

Order of Chosen Friends— Grand Council of Califor- 
nia, organized May, 1881. Meets annually on the second 
Tuesday in February. W. F. Morrison, M. D., Grand 
Secretary. Office, 23 Kearny Street. Fourteen Subordi- 
nate Councils have been organized in San Francisco. 

Order of the Eastern Star— Grand Chapter, organ- 
Ized May, 1873. Meets annually on the first Monday after 
the second Tuesday in October. Mrs. H. A. Willett, 
Grand Secretary. Office, 32 O'Farrell Street. Three 
Subordinate Chapters have been organized in San Fran- 
cisco. 



GUIDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 85 



Pacific Homeopathic Dispensary Association- 
Organized December, 1876. Objects : To provide medical 
aid for the indigent sick. The Dispensary, located at 843 
Howard Street, is open daily, Sundays excepted, from 11 
A. M. to 1 p. M. and from 3 to 4 p. m. 

Pacific Yacht Club— Organized June, 1878. Meets 
first Wednesday in March, June, September, and Decem- 
ber. W. R. Melville, Secretary. Headquarters, Club 
House, Saucelito. 

Patriotic Order Sons of America— State Camp, or- 
ganized December, 1880. Meets annually on the third 
Monday in February. A. K. Hollis, State Secretary- 
Office, 2222 Mission Street. One Commandery, seven 
Camps, and two Circles of Daughters of Liberty have 
been organized in San Francisco. 

Polish Society of California— Organized January, 
1873. Meets first and third Sundays of each month. 
Rooms, 1235 Market Street. 

Portuguese Protective and Benevolent Society 
—Organized August, 1868. Meets second and last Thurs- 
days of each month at 510 Bush Street. Charles Warren, 
Secretary. Office, 58 Clay Street. 

San Francisco Art Association— Organized March, 
1871. Objects: The promotion of painting, sculpture, and 
fine arts akin thereto, the diffusion of a cultivated taste 
for art in the community at large, and the establishment 
of an Academy or School of Design. At least one public 
Art Exhibition is held each year. Three sessions of the 
School of Design are held yearly, commencing on the 
third Mondays in January, May, and September. The 
rooms, located at 430 Pine Street, are open daily, free to 
the public, except during the holding of Art Exhibitions, 
when au entrance fee is charged. 

San Francisco Benevolent Association— Organ- 
ized March, 1865. Objects: To afford temporary relief to 
the deserving indigent. R. Beeching, Manager. Rooms, 
open from 1 to 4 p. m., 20 Webb Street, 



86 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

San Francisco County Medical Society— Organ- 
ized February, 1868. Objects: The cultivation and ad- 
vancement of medical science by united exertions for 
mutual improvement, and contributions to medical litera- 
ture. W. H. A. Hodgdon, M. D., Secretary. Office, 108 
Geary Street. 

San Francisco Medical Benevolent Society- 
Organized December, 1870. Objects : The protection and 
relief of deserving physicians or their families who may 
suffer from sickness or want, and to promote kindly, pro- 
fessional, and social intercourse. A. M. Wilder, M. D., 
Secretary. Office, 215 Geary Street. 

San Francisco Microscopical Society— Organized 
April, 1872. Objects : The study of microscopical science. 
Meets second and fourth Mondays of each month at 120 
Sutter Street, room 44. E. J. Wickson, Secretary. Office, 
414 Clay Street, 

San Francisco Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals— Incorporated April, 1868. Meets 
third Thursday of each month. Nathaniel Hunter, Sec- 
retary. Office, 614 Merchant Street. 

San Francisco Turn Verein— Organized August, 
1852. This society has erected a commodious building at 
323 Turk Street. In addition to the gymnasium, there are 
rooms for social and literary purposes, and a library con- 
taining about twelve thousand volumes. Every Tuesday 
and Thursday evenings the members indulge in gymnas- 
tic exercises, under the leadership of an experienced 
teacher. The rooms are'open during the day and evening. 

San Francisco Yacht Club— Organized July, 1869. 
Meets first Tuesday of ,;each month at the Palace Hotel. 
Charles G. Yale, Secretary. Office, 414 Clay Street. 
Headquarters, Club House, Saucelito. 

Scandinavian Society— Organized February, 1859. 
Objects : To assist their sick and destitute countrymen. 
Meets first Tuesday of each'month. The library, contain- 
ing about one thousand volumes, and a reading-room, are 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 87 

open every day and evening. John B. linudsen, Secre- 
tary. Rooms, 71 New Montgomery Street. 

Society of California Pioneers— Organized August, 
1850. Objects: To collect and preserve information con- 
nected with the early settlement and subsequent history of 
the country; to form a library and cabinet; and in all ap- 
propriate matters to advance the interests and perpetuate 
the memory of those whose sagacity, energy, and enter- 
prise induced them to settle in the wilderness and be- 
come founders of a new State. All persons who were 
residents of California prior to the first day of January, 

1850, and the male descend ents of all such, are eligible to 
membership. In addition to a library of about two thou- 
sand volumes, the society possesses a fine cabinet of min- 
erals and many relics of early times. The rooms, located 
at 808 Montgomery Street, are open from 9 a. m. to 10 

p. M. 

Sons of Temperance— Grand Division, organized 

1851. Meets annually on the fourth Tuesday in April. 
J. R. McLean, Grand Scribe, 1621 O'Farrell Street. Four 
Subordinate Divisions have been organized in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Sons of the Emerald Isle— Organized March, 1852. 
Meets first Wednesday of each month at 818 Howard 
Street. 

Spanish Mutual Benevolent Society— Organized 
1877. Meets last Thursday of each month at 510 Bush 
Street. Thomas M. Jewett, Secretary. Office, U. S. Ap- 
praiser's Building. 

St. Andrew's Society— Organized September, 1863. 
Objects : To aid indigent natives of Scotland, and secure 
employment for their unemployed countrymen. Meets 
every Monday. The reading-room of the society, located 
at 232 Sutter Street, is open during the day and evening. 
George St. J. Bremner, Secretary. Office, 232 Sutter 
Street. 

Swedish Society— Organized September, 1875. Ob- 



88 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



jects: To assist their sick and destitute countrymen. 
Meets every Monday at 71 New Montgomery Street. 

Swiss Mutual Benevolent Society — Organized 
1849. Objects: Mutual relief in case of sickness, and to 
bury its dead members. Henry J. Solaro, Secretary. 
Office, 309 Clay Street. 

Territorial Pioneers of California— Organized No- 
vember, 1874. Objects : To collect and preserve historical 
facts and information in connection with the early and 
subsequent history of the Pacific Coast; to form a library 
and a cabinet of minerals, etc.; and to perpetuate the 
memory of those whose valor and enterprise advanced 
civilization to the shores of the Pacific. All who were 
residents of California prior to the ninth day of Septem- 
ber, 1850, and the male descendents of all such, are eligi- 
ble to membership. The society has a library containing 
several hundred volumes, and a fine collection of minerals 
and other objects of interest. The rooms, located at 838 
Market Street, are open during the day and evening. 

United Ancient Order of Druids— Grand Grove 
of California, organized May, 1865. Meets annually 
on the first Tuesday in June. Henry A. Chase, Grand 
Secretary. Office, Druids Hall, 413 Sutter Street. One 
Supreme Arch Chapter, eleven Groves, and one Druidic 
Circle have been organized in San Francisco. 

United Bar of San Francisco— Organized March, 
1879. Objects : To promote the interests of the legal pro- 
fession. W. A. S. Nicholson, Secretary. Office, 623 
Montgomery Street. 

Veterans' Home Association— Incorporated March, 
1882. Objects: To establish a home for the relief and 
support of worthy soldiers, marines, and sailors who 
have honorably served during any war in the army or 
navy of the United States, and who are in indigent cir- 
cumstances, and by reason of age, infirmity, or wounds 
received in service are incapable of self-support. A build- 
ing for this purpose will be erected by the society during 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 89 



the present year at Yountville, Napa County. L. Wad- 
ham, Secretary. Office, 528 California Street. 
Young Mens' Christian Association— Organized 

September, 1853. Objects: The improvement of the spir- 
itual, moral, mental, social, and physical condition of 
young men. To accomplish these objects the society has 
erected a handsome and commodious building at 232 
Sutter Street, which contains a library of over four thou- 
sand well-selected volumes, and a reading-room .supplied 
with magazines and daily and weekly newspapers from 
all parts of the country. There is also a handsomely 
furnished parlor and conversation-room, a gymnasium, 
bowling-alley, bath-rooms, etc., for the recreation and 
convenience of the members. Strangers and others are 
invited to visit the building, and if desired, will be fur- 
nished with reliable information concerning the city, and 
directed to good boarding places. The rooms are open 
on week days from 8: 30 a. m. to 10 p. m., and on Sundays 
from 1 to 9 p. m. 

Young "Women's Christian Association— Incor- 
porated February, 1878. Objects : To establish an indus- 
trial department for destitute women, and a reading-room 
and library for females; to seek out friendless and home- 
less young women, extend to them the hand of encour- 
agement, and secure for them proper employment; to 
carry Bible truths, Christian sympathy, and help to all 
families needing such ministrations, also to persons 
confined in hospitals and jails. Eooms, 539 Howard 
Street. 

Youths' Directory — Established November, 1874, 
under the patronage of Archbishop Alemany. This is de- 
signed to be a temporary home, where friendless boys of 
any tongue or kindred may find welcome, food, and shel- 
ter, and remain under proper discipline for a short season, 
until places are secured for them in town or country. 
The building, erected for this purpose at 1417 Howard 
Street, contains an office, a large dormitory, kitchen, re- 



90 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

fectory, reading-room, bath-room, etc., together with 
apartments for the Superintendent and his family. It is 
maintained by voluntary contributions. James Reid, 
Superintendent. 

ASYLUMS. 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society Home, 68 Clementina 
Street. 

City and County Almshouse, Mission Ocean House Road 
near Laguna Honda. 

Foundling Asylum, 913 Golden Gate Avenue. 

Home for Aged and Infirm Females, Eincon Place near 
Bryant Street. 

Home for the Care of the Inebriate, North-east comer 
of Stockton and Chestnut Streets. 

Home of Friendless Children, 2318 Webster. 

House of Mercy, Eincon Place, near Bryant Street. 

Kong Chow Asylum (Chinese), 512 Pine Street. 

Ladies' Protection and Belief Society Home, Franklin 
Street between Geary and Post. 

Little Sisters' Infant Shelter, 512 Minna Street. 

Magdalen Asylum, Potrero Avenue near Twenty-first 
Street. 

Old Peoples' Home, Francisco Street near Powell. 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum, Devisadero Street near 
Hayes. 

Protestant Episcopal Church Home, San Jose Avenue 
near Twenty-seventh Street. 

Protestant Orphan Asylum, Laguna Street near 
Haight. 

Eoman Catholic Orphan Asylum, South San Francisco 
near Bay View. 

St. Boniface Orphan Asylum, 112 Grove Street. 

St. Joseph's Infant Asylum, South San Francisco near 
Bay View. 

Youths' Directory, 1417 Howard Street. 



QUroE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 91 



HOSPITALS. 

California State Woman's, Sacramento Street near Ba- 
ker. 

City and County, Potrero Avenue near Twenty-second. 

City Keceiving, Old City Hall. 

French, Bryant Street near Fifth. 

German, Fourteenth Street near Castro. 

Italian, Twenty-eighth Street near 2soe. 

Kong Chow (Chinese), 512 Pine Street. 

Pacific Dispensary for Women and Children, 221 Thir- 
teenth Street. 

Pacific Homeopathic Dispensary, 843 Howard Street. 

San Francisco Female, 806 Stockton Street. 

San Francisco Lying-in, 913 Golden Gate Avenue. 

St. Luke's, San Jose Avenue near Twenty-seventh 
Street. 

St. Mary's, North-west corner of First and Bryant 
Streets. 

Twenty-sixth Street (small-pox), De Haro Street near 
Colusa. 

United States Marine, Presidio Reservation. 

CEMETERIES. 

Four of the cemeteries of San Francisco are situated in 
the immediate vicinity of Lone Mountain, a high peak 
near the intersection of Geary Street and Central Avenue. 
Among these is Laurel Hill, occupying a picturesque site 
on an elevated plateau overlooking the bay and ocean. 
It is beautifully laid out with pleasant walks lined with 
natural shrubbery, and wide carriage-ways winding 
among its miniature hills and valleys. Many of the 
tombs and monuments are elegant in design, and sur- 
rounded by beautiful green lawns, shrubs, and flowers. 
Near by are the Calvary, Masonic, and Odd Fellows 
cemeteries, which are also tastefully laid out, and contain 



92 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 



handsome monuments erected to the memory of the de- 
parted. These may all be reached by either the Geary 
Street, Sutter Street, California Street, or Central R. R. 
cars. The Mission Dolores churchyard on Dolores Street 
near Sixteenth, which was consecrated by the founders 
of the Mission, and first used as a burial place one hun- 
dred and seven years ago, is an interesting spot to visit. 
This and the two Hebrew cemeteries, the Home of Peace 
and Sherith Israel on Dolores Street between Eighteenth 
and Twentieth, may be reached by the Market Street cars. 
The Golden Gate or City Cemetery is situated west of 
Thirty-third Avenue near the termination of Point Lobos 
Avenue. In addition to the ground reserved by the city, 
it contains many lots which have been granted for burial 
purposes to various benevolent societies. The cars of the 
Geary Street R. R. convey passengers to within a short 
distance of it. Besides those enumerated above, there is 
in the Presidio Reservation a burial place for deceased 
officers and soldiers of the U. S. Army. 

LIBRARIES. 

B'nai B'rith, 4,500 volumes, 121 Eddy Street. 

California Academy of Sciences, 5,000 volumes, South- 
west corner of California and Dupont Streets. 

California Pioneers, 2,000 volumes, 808 Montgomery St. 

Druids, 2,000 volumes, 413 Sutter Street. 

Free Public, 45,000 volumes. Bush Street between 
Kearny and Dupont. 

Improved Order of Red Men, 1,000 volumes, 320 Post 
Street. 

Knights of Pythias, 3,500 volumes, 913 Market Street. 
Law, 21,000 volumes. New City Hall. 
Ligue Nationale Francaise, 12,000 volumes, 120 Sutter 
Street. 

Mariners, 900 volumes, North-east corner of Sacramento 
and Drumm Streets. 



Cab and Carriage Company 

stables, 13'^4 and 1326 Market St. 

■'rlnciual Stnuds: S. %%'• c«»rner Kearny, <ieary and 
Market Street*. 

Central Stand:. 3Vo. 5 Kearny Street. 




THE LATEST STYLES OF CARRIAGES, CABS AND COL'PES 

Alwavs in attendance at the Stables and Stands. 

Also a Fine Assortinqpt of Buggies, Rockaways, Phaetons, and 
Turnovits of all Descriptions at the most Reasonable Terms. 

53^ I'artleular Attention to all Orders. Any overcharpe, or nettleet of 

drivf rs, if reporteii to the owner aM manager, 1'. A. Dui-xn, 

at the Stand or Stablea. will be attended ro, 

and satisfaction guaranteed. 

^CABS AND COUPES. 

s 1,1/1 e Far «» ' * .5ij ; Cliff House and R^-turu f^.no 

I'-r'Hour .'.'...............1 00 : Pirk 'i.S^t 

P;irti< !?. f t.'.. Each Way . I.W Funerals --<'») 

HACKS AND CARRIAGES. 

Pt-r Hoftr. .... $l-'>'' TUeRtres. tic Jii.OO 

( ifif Uou^ and Return 5." ' " ' 

Park S 

To all R«'B««^a»* Kidern a fCcdurtioii rf<»in the nl>u«e 
rates >viH be made, by applyinjf to ll»e owner, 

Telephone No*;. 3151 and 3152. 



p. LINDACHLJ^ -. V . ^i.-MU.^M.i. 

LINDACHER & STADTFELD, 

l>ejileri» ill aiitl lffniiiif'aftui-or» or 

Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

34 MONTCOIVIERY STREET, 

Opposite tttv I.iek Muuse, SAN FRANCISCO, 



OUR SPECIALTY: 

The Manufacture of Perfect-Fitting Shirts. 

NV. h < HAMBERLAI.X. - I A 1U>BIN^..\ 




The OMfst and the Most Thorouffh Jfusin^'ss Trtiininy 

School on Ihf Coant. 

LIFE SCHOLARSHfPS, $70.00 

I'liid in IiiAlalliiifuts, ,•$?;>. OO. 

5?^- LADIES ADMITTED INTO ALL THE DKPARTMENT> 



ay and Evening' Sessions During the Entire Year. Special 
Inducements Offered to Persons of Neglected Education. 

8^ SEND FOR ClkCl!. A.;. "*'*.>: 



QUmB TO SAN FEANCISCO AND VICINITY. 93 



Mechanics' Institute, 33,000 volumes, 27 Post Street. 

Mercantile, 51,629 volumes, 216 Bush Street. 

Military, 1,200 volumes and 300 maps, 328 Montgomery- 
Street. 

Odd Fellows, 38,920 volumes, 325 Montgomery Street. 

San Francisco Turn Verein, 12,000 volumes, 323 Turk 
Street. 

San Francisco Yerein, 4,000 volumes, 219 Sutter Street. 

Scandinavian, 1,000 volumes, 71 New Montgomery 
Street. 

Spanish and Spanish-American, 500 volumes, 531 Cali- 
fornia Street. 

State Mining Bureau, 500 volumes, 212 Sutter Street. 

Territorial Pioneers, 1,500 volumes, 838 Market Street. 

Young Men's Christian Association, 4,000 volumes, 232 
Sutter Street. 

Young Women's Christian Association, 1,000 volumes, 
539 Howard Street. 

COLLEGES AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 

Notwithstanding the number and excellence of the 
public schools of San Francisco, there are in addition to 
these upwards of one hundred institutions of learning, 
ranging in size and character from the small private 
school to the large and well-appointed college. Some of 
these are in a very flourishing condition, and afford to the 
rising generation ample facilities for acquiring a thorough 
and finished education. The number of pupils attending 
private and Church Schools (not including Chinese), as 
reported by the Census Marshals in June, 1882, was five 
thousand five hundred and eighty-nine. Following will 
be found the names and location of the different colleges : 
California College of Pharmacy, Fulton Street near Van 
Ness Avenue. 

College of Notre Dame, Dolores Street between Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth. 



94 OUIDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Hastings College of the Law (under the auspices of the 
University of California), Rooms, Old City Hall. 

Heald's Business College, 24 Post Street. 

Medical College of the Pacific, 115 Haight Street. 

Medical Department of the University of California, 
Stockton Street near Chestnut. 

Pacific Business College, 320 Post Street. 

Sacred Heart College, South-east corner of Eddy and 
Larkin Streets. 

Sacred Heart Presentation Convent, South-west comer 
of Ellis and Taylor Streets. 

St. Ignatius College, Hayes Street near Van Ness Av- 
enue. 

St. Mary's College, San Jose Road near Four-Mile House. 

St. Rose's Academy, Golden Gate Avenue near Steiuer. 

Theological Seminary, 121 Haight Street. 

University City College, 119 Haight Street. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The pioneer paper of San Francisco, called the Califor- 
nia Star, was first issued as a weekly by Samuel Brannan 
on the 7th of January, IMl. In May following, another 
paper, called the Californian, was established by Mr. Sem- 
ple. This, the pioneer journal of the Territory, had, since 
August, 1846, been published at Monterey. In 1848 these 
two papers were consolidated, under the name of the Star 
and Californian, which title was retained until January, 
1849, when it became the Alta California. On January 
22nd, 1850, the latter was issued as a daily, and on the 
following morning another daily, called the Journal of 
Commerce, made its first appearance. During the year 
four more were established; viz., the Pacific News, Even- 
ing Picayune, Herald, and Courier. These were followed 
by others in rapid succession, some of which had but a 
short-lived existence. At the present time the number of 
daily and weekly papers and periodicals published in the 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 95 



city amount to about one hundred and forty. The daily 
papers are the Alta California, Chronicle, Daily Ex- 
change, Daily Report, Evening Bulletin, Evening Post, 
Examiner, Morning Call, and three in foreign languages, 
viz., the Abend Post and California Demokrat in Ger- 
man, and the Courrier de San Francisco in French. Be- 
sides these, there ai-e two daily dramatic papers, and a 
law journal. The weeklies and monthlies embrace many 
excellent papers and magazines, severally devoted to the 
interests of religion, benevolence and fraternity, temper- 
ance, science, commerce and trade, agriculture, mining, 
etc. The papers published wholly or partly in foreign 
languages include eight German, two French, four He- 
brew, three Spanish, two Italian, one Portuguese, one 
Swiss, one Swedish, one Scandinavian, and three Chinese. 

HOTELS. 

Several of the hotels of San Francisco are unsurpassed 
for elegance, comfort, and completeness of appoint- 
ment, and will compare favorably with the first-class 
hotels of any city in the world. The Palace, occupying 
the entire block bounded by Market, New Montgomery, 
Jessie, and Annie Streets, is a gigantic structure seven 
stories in height, covering nearly two and a quarter acres 
of ground. It contains about eight hundred rooms, all 
elegantly furnished and supplied with every modern con- 
venience. Equal to the Palace in every respect except in 
size are The Baldwin, Occidental, Lick, and Grand, all 
centrally located on prominent streets. The prices 
charged for accommodations are about the same at each, 
varying from three to five dollars a day according to the 
size and location of rooms. Persons desiring less expens- 
ive quarters can find many excellent hotels, where the 
prices vary from one dollar and a half to two dollars and 
a half per day. Among these are the Euss, Commercial, 
Brooklyn, Ahlborn, International, Prescott, etc. In addi- 



96 OriDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 



tion to the regular hotels, there are many establishments 
on the principal thoroughfares where nicely furnished 
suites or single rooms may be hired by the week or month, 
and in the immediate vicinity are restaurants where ex- 
cellent meals can be obtained at a moderate price. 

Ahlboru House, 321 Dupont Street. 

American Exchange, 319 Sansome Street. 

Baldwin, North-east corner of Powell and Market 
Streets. 

Brooklyn, 210 Bush Street. 

California, 210 Montgomery Avenue. 

Central, 217 Broadway Street. 

Central Pacific, 348 Fourth Street. 

Chicago, 220 Pacific Street. 

Commercial, South-east corner of Montgomery Avenue 
and Pacific Street. 

Franklin, 321 Pacific Street. 

Gailhard, 507 Pine Street. 

Golden Eagle, 402 Broadway Street. 

Golden Gate, 134 Fourth Street. 

Grand, South-east corner of Market and New Montgom- 
ery Streets. 

Hackmeier's, 512 Bush Street. 

Hackmeier House, 435 Pine Street. 

Hansa, 429 Bush Street. 

Helvetia, 431 Pine Street. 

Hotel Pthein, 909 Kearny Street. 

International, 824 Kearny Street. 

Lick House, South-west corner of Montgomery and 
Sutter Streets. 

Montgomery's, 227 Second Street. 

New Atlantic, 207 Montgomery Avenue. 

New Winconsin, North-east corner of Montgomery and 
Pacific Streets. 

Occidental, Montgomery Street between Sutter and 
Bush. 

Philadelphia House, 423 Bush Street. 



GUIDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



97 



Palace, South-west corner of Market and New Mont- 
gomery Streets. 

Prescott House, South-west corner of Montgomery Ave- 
nue and Kearny Street. 

Russ House, Montgomery Street between Bush and Pine. 

Siegfried's, 228 Bush Street. 

Swiss, 629 Commercial Street. 

United States, 304 Beale Street. 

Western, 212 Broadway Street. 

What Cheer House, 527 Sacramento Street. 

HACK AND CAB ORDINANCE. 

The following rates of fare have been established by the 
city government for all public hacks and cabs. Any 
driver who overcharges is liable to prosecution, and 
should be reported at the office of the Chief of Police. 

For a hackney carriage drawn by more than one horse, 
for one or two persons, not exceeding one mile, S1.50; for 
more than two persons, not exceeding one mile, S2; for 
each additional mile for each person, 25 cents; provided 
that no additional charge to the above rates shall be made 
for stoppages for a period not to exceed in the aggregate 
, ten minutes' time. 

I For a hackney carriage drawn by more than one horse, 
I for four or a less number of persons, when engaged by 
1 the hour, to be computed for time occupied in going and 
returning, including detention, $2 for the first hour and 
$1.50 for each subsequent hour. 

For a hackney coach drawn by one horse, for one or 
two persons, not exceeding one mile, $1; for each addi- 
tional mile, 50 cents; for two persons, when engaged by 
the hour, to be computed for time occupied in going and 
returning, including detention, $1.50 for the first hour, 
and $1 for each subsequent hour. 

Ko extra charge to any passenger shall be made for the 
ordinary amount of baggage. 



98 GUIDE TO SAN FRA^'CISCO AND VIClNITr. 



From any landing of any steamboat or railroad depot to 
any point within the district bounded by the water front, 
Broadway, Gough, and Twelfth Streets, shall be esti- 
mated not to exceed one mile. 

Every driver of a hackney carriage shall at all times 
keep conspicuously posted within the carriage of which 
he may have charge, in such position as to be easily read, 
the number of such carriage, and also a notice showing 
the rates of fare which may be lawfully charged for the 
use thereof. 

MARKETS. 

The principal markets of the city are open from 5 a. m. 
to 5 p. M. daily, except Sundays and holidays. On Satur- 
day evenings they keep open until 10 p. m. 

Bay City, 1142 Market Street. 

California, California Street between Montgomery and 
Kearny. 

Centre, South-east corner of Sutter and Dupont Streets. 

Clay Street, 514 Clay Street. 

Columbo (vegetable). Front Street near Pacific. 

Fisherman's, Xorth-east corner of Front and Vallejo 
Streets. 

Grand Arcade, Sixth Street between Folsom and Harri- 
son. 

Grand Central, Market Street near Sixth. 

Grand Floral, 741-747 Mission Street. 

Grand Western, Polk Street near Bush. 

Hayes Valley, Laguna Street between Hayes and 
Grove. 

Mission, North-east comer of Mission and Sixteenth 
Streets. 

New Metropolitan, South-east corner of New Montgom- 
ery and Mission Streets. 

Pacific Fruit, 5U Clay Street. 

San Francisco, 523-530 Clay Street. 

Washington, 515-52.3 Washington Street. 



GUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VldNITY. 



99 



BATHS. 

Besides the fresh-water bathing establishments to be 
found at or in the immediate vicinity of the principal ho- 
tels, there are also several salt-water and swimming 
baths. Of these, three are located on the bay-shore near 
the foot of Larkin Street, and one, the Sanitarium, at the 
foot of Powell Street. The latter establishment is ad- 
mirably fitted up for the accommodation of ladies and 
gentlemen who desire either hot, cold, steam or shower 
salt-water baths. The water used is brought through lolO 
feet of pipe from outside the sea-wall. It is open the year 
round, from sunrise until 9 o'clock p. m. There is also a 
salt-water swimming bath at Long Bridge Wharf, foot of 
Fourth Street. The extensive bathing establishment of 
Dr Justin Gates, at 722 Montgomery Street, affords excel- , 
lent accommodations for those who desire Turkish, Rus- 
sian, or medicated vapor baths. Special apartments have 1 
been nicely fitted up for ladies and families. 

THEATRES. 

Adelphi, 607 California Street. 

Baldwin, 934 Market Street. 

Bella Union, 803 Kearny Street. 

Bush Street, 323 Bush Street. 

California, Bush Street between Kearny and Dupont. 

Ch nese, 8U Washington Street and 623 Jackson Street. 

German, on Sunday evenings only, in Calif ornia Theatre. 

Grand Opera House, Mission Street near Third. 

Market Street, 771 Market Street. 

Xiblo's Garden, South-west corner of Grove and Lagu- 

na Streets. 

Standard, 320 Bush Street. 

ihe Fountain, south-east corner of Sutter and Kearny 

Streets 
Tivoli Opera House, 28-32 Eddy Street. 
Winter Garden, 305 Stockton Street. 



100 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITr. 



MUSEUMS. 

tPr^!/^'''''''n ^""^^^"^y °^ Sciences-Besidesthein- 

in eo r r''"'' f ^^^^^^s, birds, fishes, reptiles. 

msects. Crustacea, shells, minerals, etc.. In their hall 

south-west corner of California and Dupont Streets the 

society has a valuable collection, known'as the SoM- 

^atuYiret^''^^^ '' ^'^ ''^^^^^"^^ "^^'^'^ ^-'''^-^' 

Rr.T^^''^*°^'^^^ Mu8eum-751 Market Street. 

State Mining Bureau-212 Sutter Street. This insti- 
tution has on exhibition a large and valuable collection 
of minerals, fossils, Indian relics, etc. 

t.r.r'^rt''^'^ CJardens.-Mission Street between Thir- 
thPr. ^.^,\^^^^^^,°t^- ^t this favorite place of resort 

ttlJ /"'"^' '^ "^^^'^°^ '^ other attractions, an 

extensive and interesting collection of animals. bi;ds, 
fishes, minerals, shells, etc. 

Soi'^t.r"^ "'c '' ^^^ ^^"°"« "^"^'^'y Association, 
325 Montgomery Street, California Pioneers, 808 Mont^ 
gomery Street, and Territorial Pioneers, 838 Market Street, 
are valuable collections of minerals and curiosities of 
different kinds, which should be seen by those who take 
an interest in such matters. 

PUBLIC PARKS AND SQUARES. 

Buena Vista Park-Situated south of Haight Street 
between Broderick and Lott, embraces an area of thirty. 
SIX acres. It occupies a site commanding a fine view of 
the city and bay, and when contemplated improvements 
are made it will become a popular resort 

Golden Gate Park-This, the grand park of the me- 
tropolis, is three miles long by about half a mile wide 
embracing an area of one thousand and thirteen acres' 
From Baker Street between Oak and Fell it is approached 
by a beautiful avenue or drive three-quarters of a mUe 



GUIDE TO ^AF VR/f CISCO AND VICINITY. 101 



long and two hundred and sev3Q*.y-fiye,feet wide. The 
Terrace, which is one of the featureG^ of the park, is an- 
other approach recently constructed from thef teriiMus of 
the Geary Street R. R. It commands a fine vie\v-.hL Ccji- 
servatory Valley, and of the grounds towards Strawber.ty 
Hill west, while to the north can be seen the Pacific 
Ocean and the entrance to the Golden Gate. The original 
surface of the park was, to a great extent, a succession of 
sand hills partly covered with a growth of stunted shrubs 
and trees, presenting a barren appearance. During the 
progress of reclamation, commenced in 1871, the greatest 
obstacle to improvements has been the drifting sand 
blown from the direction of the ocean by the high winds 
which at times prevail. This, however, has been to a 
great extent checked by the various expedients resorted 
to, such as the construction of brush fences near the 
ocean beach, and planting of trees and shrubbery. In- 
stead of barren sand hills are now to be seen beautiful 
avenues and shady walks miles in extent, green lawns, 
nurseries and flower gardens, a magnificent conservatory 
containing thousands of choice plants, croquet and picnic 
grounds, arbors, grottoes, lakes, fountains, etc.— all com- 
bined presenting a romantic and picturesque appearance. 
The main drive, extending through the park to the ocean 
j beach, is a superb road, and is daily traversed by hun- 
dreds of carriages and equestrians. 

Mountain Lake Park— West of Seventh Avenue 
between California Street and Presidio Reservation, em- 
braces an area of twenty acres. It is situated on the 
shores of a small lake from which it derives its name, and 
will, when improved, be an attractive resort. 

Pioneer Park— On the summit of Telegraph Hill, 
embraces a small area of ground donated to the city by 
some liberal citizens. From this point may be obtained 
a magnificent view of the bay and city. 

In addition to the parks enumerated, there are sixteen 
small squares, or plazas, in different sections of the city, 



102 



GUma TO SAN FBANgjSCO AND VICINITY. 



some of which hav3 been improved, and present an attract- 
ive appearance. Among these may be mentioned Union 
Square, bounded by Stockton, Powell, Geary, and Post 
Str'o^is:'^''ashington Square, bounded by Stockton, Pow- 
ell, Union, and Filbert Streets; and Portsmouth Square, 
on Kearny Street between Clay and Washington. The 
latter is noted as being the place where the stars and 
stripes was raised when the American forces took formal 
possession of the town, on the 8th day of July, 1846. 

PUBLIC GARDENS, ETC. 

Germania Gardens, Erie Street near Mission. 

Harbor View, corner of Tonquin and Baker Streets. 
Concerts on Sunday afternoons. Reached by the Pre- 
sidio R. R. cars. 

Recreation Grounds. A favorite resort for base-ball 
and cricket players. Corner of Folsom and Twenty-fifth 
Streets, 

Seaside Gardens, comer of Jefferson and Baker Streets. 
Concerts on Sunday afternoons. Reached by the Pre- 
sidio R. R. cars. 

South San Francisco Park, Railroad Avenue between 
Ninth and Tenth Avenues. Reached by the Potrero and 
Bay View R. R. cars. 

Union Grounds, a resort for base-ball players, corner of 
Seventh and Townsend Streets. 

Woodward's Gardens, Mission Street between Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth. At this popular resort will be 
found a conservatory containing many choice plants, a 
museum, aquarium, menagerie, etc. On Saturday and 
Sunday afternoons concerts and theatrical performances 
are given in the immense pavilion erected for that pur- 
pose. This building is one hundred and fifty feet long by 
one hundred and thirty wide and fifty feet* high, but al- 
though covering so large an area, it is at times crowded 
with spectators. 



QUiDK TO sAy FftAirei^co and vicinity. 



103 



RACE COURbZfo.^ 

Agricultural Park, Point Lobos Avenue tioar^T-^enty. 
third Avenue. Reached by the Geary Street E. K.' 6^.-8. 

Bay District Fair Grounds, west of First Avenue be- 
tween A and C Streets. Reached by the Geary Street 
K. E. cars. 

Ocean View Riding and Driving Park, terminus of the 
Ocean House Road. Can be reached only by carriage or 
on horseback. 

DRIVES. 

There are but few cities in the Union where more 
attractive and pleasant drives can be found than those 
in the immediate vicinity of San Francisco. A view 
of the picturesque scenery which a trip over the roads 
extending through the suburbs of the city affords can, 
owing to the even temperature of the climate, be enjoyed 
during all seasons of the year without suffering any in- 
convenience from the extremes of heat or cold. One of 
the most noted and beautiful drives is over what is 
known as Point Lobos Avenue, from the termination of 
Geary Street westerly to the Cliff House. It is a smooth 
macadamized road, wide enough in places for a dozen 
teams abreast. The Cliff House may also be reached by 
the way of Geary and intersecting streets to the entrance 
to Golden Gate Park, and from thence by a superb road 
extending through the park to the ocean beach. On 
pleasant days these roads present a gay and animated 
appearance, being lined by carriages and buggies passing 
to and fro. From the termination of Point Lobos Ave- 
nue is a road winding down the cliff, and extending in a 
southerly direction along the ocean beach several miles, 
until it intersects with one leading to the Ocean House. 
From the latter place the homeward trip can be made by 
what is known as the Central Ocean House Road, or by 
the San Miguel Road, leading to the Mission Dolores, 



104 GUroE TO SAN FRANCBSTO .VND VICINITY. 



each affording charming -views of the city and bay. From 
the intersection of California and Lyon Streets a good 
road- extenxl« in a north-westerly direction, through the 
-PT^idio:Reservation to Fort Point. This pa.sses in places 
X)\rer elevated ground which commands a magnificent 
view of the Golden Gate and Pacific Ocean. Those who 
wish to see the eastern and southern portion of the city 
should drive from the foot of Fourth Street, over Long 
Bridge, and across the Potrero and Islais Creek Bridge 
thence through South San Francisco to Bay View, a pretty 
locality near the county line. The return trip can be 
made by the way of the San Bruno Road and Potrero 
Avenue, thus affording a still more extended view of that 
portion of the city. Another drive that may be mentioned 
is through Mission Street to the San Jose or County Road 
which runs in a southerly direction to San Mateo County' 
This road passes by St. Mary's College, and near its inter- 
section with what is known as the Old Ocean House Road 
are located the Industrial School and House of Correction' 
The best time for any of these drives is in the morning 
-the earlier the better. A person will then escape the 
winds and fogs which at certain times of the year pre- 
vail during the afternoon and evening. 

PRIVATE RESIDENCES. 

All large cities have certain favorite localities wliere 
wealthy citizens delight to build magnificent homes. In 
San Francisco, the sites selected for the erection of pala- 
tial residences are, generally speaking, on some of the 
elevated plateaus which command a magnificent view of 
the bay, city, and surrounding country. On one of these 
known as the California Street Hill, or, as it is sometimes 
called, Nob Hill, are four residences erected at an im- 
mense cost by the railroad millionaires, all located within a 
short distance of each other, as follows : Leland Stanford's, 
south-west corner of California and Powell; Mark Hop^ 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 105 



kins's, south-east corner of California and Mason; D. D. 
Colton's, north-east corner of California and Taylor; and 
Charles Crocker's, north-west corner of California and 
Taylor. Not far distant from these are the beautiful 
residences of Lloyd Tevis, 1316 Taylor Street, James B. 
Haggin, south-east corner of Taylor and Washington; 
and one erected by W. C. Ralston, on Pine near Leaven- 
worth. On Rincon Hill, Sutter and California Streets, 
Van Ness Avenue, and throughout what is called the 
Western Addition are other elegant homes too numerous 
to admit of particular mention. 

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. 

The following information, gleaned mostly from the 
Assessor's Report, and the Annual Review of the "San 
Francisco Chronicle," will give an idea of the character 
and extent of the various manufacturing enterprises car- 
ried on in this city. 

San Francisco cannot lay claim to being a manufactur- 
ing city in the same sense in which the term is applied to 
many of the cities of the East and of Europe. Whatever 
manufactures have found a foothold on the Pacific Coast 
have been called into life by home demands, which for 
many years depended entirely upon imports from the 
East and from Europe. It is only within late years that 
efforts have been made to encourage manufactures, and 
to induce capital to seek investment in that direction. 
The field was certainly very inviting, for there was a 
large and growing market, not only in California, but 
also in Oregon, Washington Territory, Nevada, Arizona, 
New Mexico, British Columbia, Mexico, and the islands 
of the Pacific, for many goods for the manufacture of 
which the raw material was abundant. At present there 
are but few branches of the world's industries which are 
not represented in San Francisco; and it may be said that 
to-day the manufacturing interests of this city are estab- 



106 GCroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



lished upon a firm basis, and may safely be depended 
upon to become an important factor in the development 
of the resources of the State. 

The industries carried on to the greatest extent as re- 
gards value of products and number of persons employed 
are the manufacture of boots and shoes, beer, clothing, 
cigars, flour, furniture, harness and saddlery, hermeti- 
callj'-sealed goods, leather, machinery, sash, doors and 
blinds, and woolen goods. From the Assessor's Report it 
appears that these various branches give employment 
in the aggregate to twenty-four thousand persons, includ- 
ing men, women, and children. In the manufacture of 
boots and shoes, clothing, and cigars, the Chinese figure 
conspicuously. Besides the large number employed in 
factories of their own, there are several thousand engaged 
in the factories owned by white men. In addition to the 
industries enumerated above, there is a rolling-mill, giv- 
ing employment to about seven hundred men; two glass- 
works, two sugar refineries, one rope-walk, one shot- 
tower, gas, wire and wire rope, lead-smelting, white lead, 
chemical, glass-cutting, marble, salt, and linseed oil 
works, brass-foundries, coffee and spice mills, two exten- 
sive provision-packing establishments, and several ship- 
yards; also factories for the manufacture of agricultural 
implements, axle-grease, barrels, bags, bellows, billiard- 
tables, boxes, brooms, brushes, candles, crackers, car- 
riages and wagons, cutlery, elevators, fringes, gloves, 
glue, hats and caps, hose and belting, ink, ice, jewelry, 
lasts, macaroni and vermicelli, matches, mirrors, musical 
instruments, oakum, safes, saws, silverware, shirts, soap, 
stoves, tinware, type, vinegar, wind-mills, etc., etc. 

THE CHINESE DISTRICT. 

"What is generally known as Chinatown embraces sev- 
eral blocks within the limits of California, Pacific, Kearny, 
and Stockton Streets. The buildings on Dupont Street 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 107 

from California north to Pacific, also those on Sacra- 
mento, Commercial, Clay, Washington, Jackson, and Pa- 
cific Streets, from Ivearny west to Stockton, have with 
few exceptions been bought or rented by the Chinese. 
On all of these streets are numerous stores for the sale of 
tea, rice, opium, groceries, fancy goods, clothing, drugs, 
etc., as well as establishments for the manufacture of 
boots and shoes, slippers, shirts, coarse clothing, cigars, 
brooms, and other articles. There are also shops occupied 
by carpenters, jewelers, watchmakers, tailors, wood 
carvers and engravers, sign and portrait painters, tin- 
smiths, butchers, and barbers, who may be seen at all 
hours of the day busily engaged in their various pursuits. 
The restaurants are all on upper floors, and are generally 
decorated with gaudy ornaments suspended in front of 
the buildings. Four of the most prominent ones, which 
are often visited out of curiosity by white persons, are 
located as follows: Hang Fer Low & Co., 713 Dupont 
Street; Yung Fong, 710 Jackson Street; Woey San Low, 
808 Dupont Street; and Bun Sun Low, 629 Jackson Street. 
There are two theatres — the Tan Sung Fung, 623 Jackson 
Street; and the BowWah Yiug, at 814 Washington Street. 
They are open every day from 2 o'clock p. m, until mid- 
night. Price of admission fifty cents, boxes two dollars 
and a half. Three newspapers are regularly issued, one of 
which is printed partly in the English language. There 
are several Joss Houses, or temples of worship, containing 
elaborately decorated images and brilliant ornaments in 
great profusion. One of the largest and most expensively 
fitted up is the Kong Chow, 512 Pine Street. Here may 
be seen the image of Quan Kong, who is the only God 
worshiped in this temple. According to Chinese history, 
Quan Kong was a noted general, who lived over two thou- 
sand years ago. He was one of three brothers, the oldest 
of whom was the first Emperor of China. He was eleven 
feet in height, very stout built, and a great warrior; hon- 
est and honorable towards all men. Other gorgeously 



108 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



fitted up temples are the Hop Wo, 751 Clay Street; Ning 
Yong, 230 Montgomery Avenue; Yeong Wo, 730 Sacra- 
mento Street; Yan Wo, St. Louis Alley; Tong Wah Meu, 
Jackson Street near Stockton; and two, the Sam Yup and 
Tin How Meu, on Waverly Place between Clay and 
Washington Streets. The Christian Chinese have, in 
addition to the mission houses established for them by 
the whites, two places of worship of their own, one of 
which is located on Stockton Street near Sacramento, and 
the other on Clay Street near Prospect Place. Those 
worshiping at the latter place are converts to Roman 
Catholicism. There are several large and well-organized 
companies, each representing a certain district in China, 
who have heretofore assumed control over all Chinese 
arriving in this city from their respective districts. They 
are the Ning Yong Co., Sam Yup Co., Kong Chow Co., 
Hop Wo Co., Shou Hing Co., Yeong Wo Co., Yin Hoi 
Co., and Yan Wo Co. Of these the Ning Yong Co. is the 
largest, and the Sam Yup Co. the most influential, being 
composed of the highest class of merchants. Among the 
associations and societies organized by the Chinese are 
the Merchants' Exchange Association, who have rooms 
at 739 Sacramento Street; and a society called Ghee Kong 
Tong, a secret order, who have a hall at 69 Spofford Alley. 
Societies have also been organized by the boot-makers, 
cigar-makers, clothing-makers, carpenters, barbers, jewel- 
ers, actors, and laundrymen, for mutual protection and 
the regulation of wages. The number of Chinese in the 
city is variously estimated at from 30,000 to 35,000, the 
latter figures are probably nearer the mark. Besides 
those residing in Chinatown, which is densely populated, 
there are many others scattered throughout other portions 
of the city. Strangers who desire to see everything of 
interest in the Chinese quarters, and learn something of 
the manners and customs of this peculiar race, should 
employ an interpreter and guide to escort them. One of 
these, an intelligent young man by the name of S. Locke, 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



109 



can be found at his place of business at 1001 Dupont 
Street, corner of Jackson. 

RAILROADS. 

The hours of departure as given below are liable to be 
changed to some extent about the 1st of November, or at 
such times as the winter arrangements of the different 
companies take effect. 

Central Pacific— Via Oakland Ferry. Several trains 
leave daily as follows: 

For Ogden and way-stations, via Benicia and Sacra- 
mento, daily at 3:30 p. m., connecting at Davis (Sundays 
excepted) with train for Woodland and Knight's Landing, 
At Reno with train for Carson and Virginia City, At 
Battle Mountain with train for Austin, At Palisade with 
train for Eureka, At Ogden with Union Pacific R. K. for 
Omaha and way-stations; Utah and Northern R. R. for 
points in Utah, Idaho, and Montana; and with Utah 
Central R. R. for Salt Lake and points in Southern Utah. 
For Colfax and way-stations, via Benicia and Sacra- 
mento, daily at 8 a. m., connecting at Vallejo Junc- 
tion with train for Vallejo, Napa, St. Helena, Calistoga, 
and way-stations, At Davis with train for Woodland, 
Yolo, Willows, Tehama, and way-stations. 

For Goshen and way-stations, via Lathrop, Modesto, 
Merced, and Fresno, daily at 9:30 a. m., connecting at 
Goshen with Southern Pacific R. R. for Los Angeles and 
points in Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, and 

Texas. 

For Sacramento and way-stations, via Hay wards, Niles, 
Pleasanton, Livermore, Lathrop, Stockton, and Gait, 
daily at 8 a. m., connecting at Niles with train for San 
Jose, At Gait with train for lone. At Sacramento with 
train for Wheatland, Marysville, Chico, Tehama, Red 
Bluff, Redding, and way-stations. 

For Stockton, Gait, and way-stations, daily (Sundays 



110 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



excepted) at 4 p. m., connecting at Yallejo Junction 
with train for Vallejo, Napa, St. Helena, Calistoga, and 
way-stations. 

For San Jose and way-stations, via Xiles, daily at 8 
A. M. and 3 p. m. 

For San Leandro, Hay wards, Niles, and way-stations, 
daily at 10 a. m. 

For Haywards, Niles, Pleasanton, Livermore, and way- 
stations, daily (Sundays excepted) at 5 p. m. 

For Martinez, Antioch, and way-stations, daily (Sun- 
days excepted) at 3 p. m. 
Ticket Office and Passenger Depot foot of Market Street. 
North Pacific Coast- Via Saucelito Ferry, daily 
(Sundays excepted) at 8:50 a. m., for Point Reyes and 
way-stations, and via San Quentin Ferry, daily (Sundays 
excepted) at 1:45 p. m., for Duncan's Mills and way-sta- 
tions, connecting at Duncan's Mills, dailv (Mondays ex- 
cepted) with stages for Stewart's Point, Gualala, Punta 
Arenas. Cuffey's Cove, Navarro, Mendocino City, and all 
points on the North Coast. 

Saturday to Monday Excursions— Round-trip tickets 
sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good to return following 
Monday, to Fairfax, Si; Camp Taylor, $2; Point Reyes, 
*2.o0; Tomales, $3.50; Duncan's Mills, .S4. 

Sunday Excursions-Via Saucelito Ferry at 8 a m and 
via San Quentin Ferry at 8: 15 a. m. Round-trip tickets 
to Camp Taylor, $1.75; Point Reyes, 82; Tomales, $2 50- 
Duncan's Mills, .S3. 
Ticket Office and Passenger Depot foot of Clay Street 
San Francisco and NortH Pacific-Via San Rafael 
daily (Sundays excepted) at 7:05 a. m. and 4:50 p m ' 
and via Donahue, daily (Sundays excepted) at 2-45 p m ' 
for Petal uma, Santa Rosa, Fulton, Healdsburg, Geyser- 
ville, Cloverdale, and way-stations. The morning train 
connects at Fulton with branch train for Guerneville 
At Geyserrille with stage for Skaggs' Springs, and at 
Cloverdale with stages for Highland Springs, Kelseyville 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. Ill 



Soda Bay, Lakeport, Navarro Ridge, Meudocino City, 
Ukiali, and Geysers. 

Sunday Excursions— Via Donahue, at 8:20 a. m., for 
Guerneville, Cloverdale, and way-stations. Round-trip 
tickets to Petaluma, Si: 50: Santa Rosa, 82; Healdsburg, 
$;3: Guerneville, 83; Cloverdale, 84:50. 

Ticket Office and Passenger Depot, via San Rafael foot 
of Clay Street, via Donahue foot of Washington Street. 

Sonoma Valley— Via steamer to Sonoma Landing, 
daily (Sundays excepted) at 2:45 p. m., for Sonoma, Glen 
Ellen, and way-stations. 

Sunday Excursions— Via steamer to Sonoma Landing, 
at 8:20 a. m. Round-trip tickets to Sonoma, 81; Pioneer 
Grove. 81.20; Glen Ellen, 81.50. 

Ticket Office and Passenger Depot foot of Washington 

Street 
South Pacific Coast -Via Alameda Ferry. Several 

trains leave daily as follows : 

For Alvarado, Newark, Centreville, Alviso, Santa 
Clara, San Jose, Los Gatos, Wright's, Glenwood, Felton, 
Big Trees, Santa Cruz, and way-stations, daily at 8:30 

A. M. 

For Mount Eden, Alvarado, Newark, Centreville, Al- 
viso, Agnew's, Santa Clara, San Jose, Los Gatos, and all 
stations to Santa Cruz, daily (Sundays excepted) at 2:30 

p. M, 

For Los Gatos and way-stations, daily at 4: 30 p. m. 

Saturdav to Monday Excursions— Round-trip tickets 
sold on Saturdays and Sundays good to return following 
Monday, to San Jose, 82.50; BigTrees, 85; Santa Cruz, 85. 

Sunday Excursions -A fast train leaves at 8 : 30 a. m. for 
the Big Trees and Santa Cruz, stopping at Santa Clara 
and San Jose only. Round-trip tickets, 83. 

Ticket Office and Passenger Depot foot of Market Street. 

Southern Pacific (Northern Division)— Several trains 
leave daily as follows: 

For Monterey and way-stations, daily at 10:40 a. m., and 



112 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO ANT) VICINITY. 



daily (Sundays excepted) at 3:30 p. m., connecting at Pa- 
jaro with train for Watson ville, Camp Goodall, Aptos, 
Soquel, and Santa Cruz, and at Castroville with train for 
Salinas and Soledad. On Sundays an excursion train for 
Monterey and Santa Cruz leaves at 7: 30 a. m. 

For Santa Clara, San Jose, and way-stations, daily at 
8:30 a. m. and 4: 25 p. m. 

For San Mateo, Belmont, Redwood, Menlo Park, and 
way-stations, daily 6:30 p. m., and daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 5: 15 p. m. On Sundays only a train leaves at 
9: 30 A. M. On Saturdays only a theatre train leaves at 
11 : 45 p. M. 

Stage connections are made with the 10:40 a. m. train, 
except Pescadero Stage via San Mateo, and Pacific Con- 
gress Springs Stage via Santa Clara, which connect with 
8:30 A. 51. train. 

Special Round-Trip Tickets- At reduced rates, to Pes- 
cadero, Monterey, Aptos, Soquel, and Santa Cruz; also, 
to Gilroy, Paraiso, and Paso Robles Springs. 

Excursion Tickets- Sold Saturday and on Sunday morn- 
ings, good to return on Monday, to Santa Clara or San 
Jose, S2.50; to Gilroy, S4; to Monterey or Santa Cruz, $5; 
also, to principal points between San Francisco and San 
Jose. 

Sunday Excursion Tickets — To either Monterey or 
Santa Cruz and return, .?3. 

Ticket Offices, Passenger Depot, corner of Townsend 
and Fourth Streets, and 2 New Montgomery Street, Pal- 
ace Hotel. 

Southern Pacific-Via Oakland Ferry and Central 
Pacific to Goshen, daily at 9:30 a. m., for Los Angeles and 
points in Southern California, Arizona, Js^ew Mexico, and 
Texas, connecting at Benson with Atchison, Topeka, and 
Santa Fe R. R. for Guaymas and way-stations in Arizona 
and Sonora, At Deming, with Atchison, Topeka, and 
Santa Fe R. R. for Kansas City and way-stations, and 
with Texas and Pacific R. R. for St. Louis and New Or- 



GUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 113 



leans, At El Paso, with Galveston, Harrisburg, and San 
Antonio R. R. for New Orleans and way-stations, and 
with Central Mexican R. R. for points in Mexico. 
Ticket Office and Passenger Depot foot of Market Street. 

EASTERN RAILROAD AGENCIES. 

Chicago and Alton, Charles Macabe, 8 New Montgom- 
ery Street. 

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, C. E. Fairbank, 138 
Montgomery Street. 

Chicago and Northwestern; Chicago, Minneapolis, and 
Omaha; Sioux City and Pacific, J. M. Davies, 2 New 
Montgomery Street. 

Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific, Clinton Jones, 36 
Montgomery Street. 

Central Branch U. P. ; International and Great North- 
ern; Missouri, Kansas, and Texas; Missouri Pacific; St. 
Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern; Texas and Pacific, 
H. B. Smith, Jr., 116 Montgomery Street. 

Grand Trunk and Great Western, W. G. Roberts, 36 
Montgomery Street. 

Hannibal and St. Joseph; The Great Burlington, T. D. 
McKay, 32 Montgomery Street. 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern; Michigan Central, 
William BeDell, 22 Montgomery Street. 

New York, Lake Erie, and Western, J. G. McCall, 36 
Montgomery Street. 

Pennsylvania Railway Lines, J. B. Kirkland, 116 
Montgomery Street. 

Texas and Pacific; Union Pacific; Atchison, Topeka, 
and Santa Fe, D. W. Hitchcock, 1 Montgomery Street. 

Wabash and Pacific, John Clark, 2 New Montgomery 
Street. 

Tickets can also be purchased for any Eastern railroad 
line at the ticket office of the Central Pacific R. R., foot of 
Market Street. 



114 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



STREET RAILROADS. 

Nearly' all points of interest in the thickly settled por- 
tion of the city can be reached by some one of the various 
lines of street-cars, at a trifling expense. The fare on all 
lines, including transfers to their branch roads, is five 
cents. 

California Street— From the corner of California and 
Kearny, through California to Central Avenue. 

Central— From the Oakland Ferry through Market, 
Pine, Sansome, Bush, Kearny, Post, Dupont, Market, 
Turk, Fillmore, and Post to Central Avenue, and from 
the corner of Turk and Fillmore through Turk to Devisa- 
dero. Another track extends from the Oakland Ferry 
through East, Jackson, Sansome, Bush, Kearny, Post, 
Stockton, Geary, Taylor, Sixth, and Brauuau to Eighth. 
Transfers are issued at the corner of Turk and Taylor 
and at the corner of Turk and Fillmore, 

City— From the Oakland Ferry through East and Mis- 
sion to Courtland Avenue a short distance south of Thir- 
tieth Street. Another track extends from the junction of 
Sutter and Market through Sutter, Dupont, Market, 
Fifth, and Mission to Twentieth. 

Clay Street Hill— From the corner of Clay and 
Kearny tlirough Clay to Van Ness Avenue. 

Geai-y Street, Park, and Ocean— From the junction 
of Geary and Market through Geary, Point Lobos Ave- 
nue, and Second Avenue to Golden Gate Park. 

Market Street— From the Oakland Ferry through 
Market and Valencia to Twenty-sixth; Hayes Valley 
Branch runs from the Oakland Ferry through Market to 
Hayes, Laguna, McAllister, Fillmore, Golden Gate Ave- 
nue, Steiner, Eddy, and Devisadero to O'Farrell; Fifth 
Street Branch runs from the corner of Fifth and Market 
through Fifth and Bluxome, to the corner of Fourth and 
Townsend; Seventeenth Street Branch runs from the 
junction of Market and Valencia through Market to 



GUTDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AXD VICINITY. 115 

Seventeeutli . Transfers given at the intersection of the 
different routes, also at the terminus of the Fifth Street 
Brancli for Potrero and Bay View cars to South San 
Francisco. 

North Beach and Mission— From the corner of 
Fourth and Townsend through Fourth, Stockton, Geary, 
Kearny, Pacitic, Dupout, Broadway, Powell, Montgom- 
ery Avenue, and Mason to Francisco. Another track 
extends from the Oakland Ferry through Market, Cali- 
fornia, Kearny, Market, Eighth, and Folsom to Twenty- 
sixth. A branch track extends from the corner of Cali- 
fornia and Montgomery through California, Battery, 
First, and Folsom to Eighth. Transfers given at the in- 
tersection of the different routes. 

Omnibus— From the Oaklaud Ferry through Market, 
Second, and Howard to Twenty-sixth. Another track 
extends from the corner of Fourth and Townsend through 
Townsend. Third, Market, Montgomery, Montgomery 
Avenue, Pacific, Stockton, Union, and Powell to Bay. A 
branch track extends from the corner of Third and Bran- 
nan through Brannan to the Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf. 
Transfers given at the intersection of the different routes. 

Potrero and Bay View — From the corner of Fourth 
and King through Fourth, and over Long Bridge to Ken- 
tucky, thence through Kentucky and Railroad Avenue 
to Sixteenth Avenue. South San Francisco. Transfers 
given at the corner of Fourth and King to the cars of the 
Fifth Street Branch of the Market Street K. R. 

Presidio and Ferries— From the junction of Mont- 
gomery Avenue, Montgomery, and Washington through 
Montgomery Avenue. Union. Steiner, Greenwich. Baker, 
and Tonquin to Presidio Reservation. A branch track 
extends from the corner of Washington and Montgomery 
through Washington and East to Oaklaud Ferry. Trans- 
fers given at the corner of Montgomery and Washington. 

Sutter Street— From the Oakland Ferry through 
Market and Sutter to Central Avenue. Another track 



116 GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

extends from the corner of Mission and Ninth through 
Ninth, Larkin, Sutter, and Polk to Union. From this 
track a branch extends from the corner of Polk and 
Pacific Avenue through Pacific Avenue to Fillmore. 
Transfers given at the intersections of the different routes. 

FERRIES AND RIVER STEAMERS. 

Alameda— (See Oakland and Alameda Time Tables.) 

Alcatraz and Angel Islands — Steamer Gen. Mc- 
Pherson leaves Washington Street Wharf daily (Satur- 
days excepted) at 6 : 05 a. m. and 4 : 15 p. m. On Saturdays 
at 6:05 a. m. and 1:30 p. m. Special trip Mondays and 
Thursdays at 11 a. m. 

Berkeley— (See Oakland and Alameda Time Table.) 

Donahue and Sonoma Landing— Steamer James M. 
Donahue leaves Washington Street Wharf daily (Sundays 
excepted ) at 2 : 45 p. m. On Sundays at 8 : 20 a. m. 

Oakland and Alameda— Via C. P. E. R. steamers 
and trains from the foot of Market Street. 

To Oakland— t6, |6 : 30, 7, 7 : 30, 8, 8 : 30, 9, 9 : 30, 10, 10 : 30, 
11, 11:30 A. M.; 12 M. ; 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2, 2:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 
4:30,5, 5:30, 6,6:30,7,8,9:30, 11, J12 p. m. 

From Oakland— t5 : 32, ^6:02, 6:32, 7:02, 7:32, 8:02, 
8:32, 9:02, 9:32, 10:02, 10:32, 11:02, 11:32, a. m. ; 12:02, 
12:32, 1:02, 1:32, 2:02, 2:32, 3:02, 3:32, 4:02, 4:32, 5:02, 
5:32, 6:02,6:32,7:02, 8:02, 9:32, 11:02 p. m. 

To East Oakland— J6, $6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 9, 9:30, 10, 
10:30, 11:30 A. m. ; 12:30, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30,4,4:30, 5, 5:30, 
6,6:30,7,8, 9:30, 11, |12 p. m. 

From East Oakland— J5: 21, ^5:51, 6:21, 6:51, 7:21, 
7:51,8:21, 8:51, 9:21, 9:51, 10:21, 10:51, 11:51 a. m. : 12;51, 
1:51, 2:51, 3:51, 4:21, 4:51, 5:21, 5:51, 6:21, 6:51, 7:51, 
9:21, 10:51 p. m. 

To Alameda— J6, 7, 8, 9. 10, 11 a. m. ; 12 m. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 
6, 7, t8, 9:30, 11, |12 p. m. 

From Ala^ieda— JS: 15, t5:45, 6:15, 7:10, 8:10, 9:10, 



$1,000 CHALLENGE! 




Ths FrueVaniier,Qr- Ors Concentrator 
• •-• 

I he ninsr, perfect TTuxleni appliance for conceiitvatiun <>i 
>ilimes and finely crii-ihed, material ; for treatment of gold 
and silver inill tailii'igs and direct concentration of oren 
of silver, lead, copper, tin. zinc, etc., after stamps or pul- 
verizers. 

Automatic and makinij perfectly clean mineral eonct-n- 
t rates at one operation. 

lOspocially adapted to low grade silver ores and jfold 
mill tailings. 

Ove.r 450 are now in use, givin^^ entire satisfaction. 
Awarded First Premium and Silver Medal at the Indus- 
trial Fair of 1«S0, of the Mechanics' Institute of S;ui 
Francisco, Cal. 

Saves from 50 to 100 per cent, more than any other Con- 
cfmtrator in use. The wear and tear are merely nominal : 
the water required is less than in any other wet Concen- 
rrator : the power required per machine is less than one- 
half horse power : the labor required is light, one man on 
:i watch can attend to sixteen machines. 

We challenge any other Concentrator in use for a fair 
and impartial competitive trial, siiio Ly sid", for stakes of 
•S 1,000 each, and we mean business. 

Agents, 

\ I^ VAT**; cV; dJ^TlTl^ZTl, 

^Fining and Mechanical Engineers, 
Room 7, No. lO» California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

N. B.— Agents for 'the Colman Tappet, Craig Oov- 
ernor, Arc. 

Mines and ^Metall urcrical Problems examined and rept>rt- 
ed on especially in connection with concentration of or«-s. 

Contracts taken for machinery for »|uartz mills, and 

,..,,■,.♦'1.1 ^-i. , ,. .fT-is:i. .11 irivcti t.l tIii- f 'OTl vf Vli ( • t 1 i ill lif tllC Saillf'. 



HENRY PLANZ, 











-^^-THK 


-^^, ..' 








1 




m 


in 


plii 


<i^^ 


ill 


ii 


1^5 



525 GEARY STREET, 



STILL GEEATEH EEDUCTIOITS ! 

Clothing Made to Order 25 Per Cent. Less than 
the Cheapest House in the City. 



He is the Champion in Regard of Cheapness. 
He is the Champion in Regard of Taste. 

He is the Champion in Regatd of Fitting. 



Pants Made to Order, - - - $4.00 
Suits Made to Order,. - - - 15.00 

A>fl> TJF»AVATtl)JS. 

The Rett»on IVhy I can Sell mu C'heai* U 

First : I don't labor under Big Keut3. 
Second: I pay Cash for all 1 buy. 

Thirii : T Vi-iv-.. no losses, >"r f ^^-i' -v'v Un- C■^<}l. 



B^ Before purchasing elsewhere you will do well to pay him h 
visit and judge for yourst-li'. 

[*nTi 



GUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 117 



10:10, 11:10 A.M.; 12:10,1:10,2:10,3:10,4:10,5:10, 6:10, 
7:15, 9:15, 10:45 p. M. 
To Fruit Vale-JT, JS, t9, flO a. m.; J4, t5, t6, $6:30 

p. M. 

From Fruit YALE-t7:47, $8:47, J9, $9:47, |10:47 a. m. ; 
J4:47, $5, $5:47, $6:47, $7:17 P. m. 

To Berkeley-$6, $6:30, 7, $7:30, 8, $8:30, 9,*9:30, 10, 
*10:30, 11, *11:30 A. M. ; 12 M. ; 1, 2, 3, 4, 4:30,5, 5:30,6, 
6:30,7,8, 9:30, $12 P. M. 

From Berkeley— $5 : 45, $6:15, 6:45, $7:15, 7:45, $8:15, 
8:45, *9 : 15, 9:45, no : 15, 10:45, *11:15, 11:45 A.M.; 12:45, 
1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:15, 5:45, 6:15, 6:45, 7:45, 
9:15, $10:45 P.M. 

To West Berkeley— $6, $6:30, 7, $7:30, *8, $8:30, 9, 10, 
11 A. M. ; 2, 3, 4, $4:30, 5, $5: 30, 6, $6: 30, 7 P. m. 

From West Berkeley— $5 : 45, $6 : 15, 6 : 45, $7 : 15, 7 : 45, 
8:45,9:45,10:45 A.M.; 1:45,2:45, 3:45, 4:45, $5:15, 5:45, 
$6 : 15, 6 : 45, $7 : 15 P. M. 

Creek Route— To Oakland— $7 : 15, 9:15, 11:15 a. m.; 
1 : 15, 3 : 15, 5 : 15 p. m. From Oakland— $6 : 15, 8 : 15, 10 : 15 
A. M.; 12:15, 2:15, 4: 15 p. m. 

♦Sundays only. $Except Sundays. 

Oakland and Alameda — Via South Pacific Coast 
R. R. steamers and trains from the foot of Market Street, 
south side. 

To Oakland and Alameda— $6 : 30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 
10:30,11:30 a.m.; *12:30, 1: 30, 2:30, 3:30, 4: 30, 5:30, 6: 30, 
7 : 30, 10, 11 : 30 p. m. 

From Fourteenth and Webster, Oakland— $5 : 57, 
$6:57, 7:57, ^8:52, 9:52, 10:52, *11:52 A. M.j 12:52, 1:52, 
2:52, 3:52,4:52,5:52,6:52, 10:20 p.m. 

From High Street, Alameda— $5 : 45, $6:45, 7:45, 8:35, 
9:35, 10:35, *11:35 a.m.; 12:35,1:35,2:35,3:35,4:35,5:35, 

6:35, 10:05 P. m. 

$Sundays excepted. *Saturday8 and Sundays only. 

Petaluma— Steamer Pilot leaves Jackson Street Wharf 
daily (Sundays excepted) at 3 p. m. 



118 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINXTT. 



Sacramento— Via Benicia, Rio Vista, Collinsville, etc., 
California Pacific R. R. steamers from the foot of ]Market 
Street daily (Sundays excepted) at 4 p. m. 

Sacramento River Landings— Via Martinez, Cali- 
fornia Transportation Co.'s steamers leave Jackson Street 
Wharf Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 11 a. m. 

San Rafael— Ala San Quentin and Saucelito Ferries 
from the foot of Clay Street. 

To San Rafael— On week days, 7: 05, *8: 50, 9: 20 a. m.; 
1 : 45, *3 : 35, 4 : 50, *5 : 30 p. m. On Sundays, *8, 8 : 15, 10 : 25 
A. M.; 1:10, 3:45, *6:40p. m. 

From San Rafael— On week days, *6: 50, 8, *8:45, 10: 35 
a. m.; 2:15, 5:20 p.m. On Sundays, *7:30, 8:50, 11:45 
a. m.; 2:25, 4:25, *6:20p. m. 

*Via Saucelito. 

Saucelito— From the foot of Clay Street. 

To SAUCELrro— On week days 8:50, 10:30 a. m. ; 1: 30 
3:35, 5:30 P. M. On Sundays, 8, 10 a. m.; 12 m.; 2, 4:15 
6:40 p. m. On Mondays only an extra trip at 7 a. m. 

From Saucelito— On week days, 7 : 45, 9 : 30, 11 : 20 a. m. ; 
2 : 30, 4 : 45 P. M. On Sundays, 8 : 45, 11 a. m. ; 1,3: 15, 5 : 30,' 
7: 20 p. M. On Saturdays only an extra trip at 6: 15 p. m. 

Stockton— Via Pittsburg, Antioch, and way-landings, 
California Steam Navigation Co.'s steamers leave Wash- 
ington Street Wharf daily (Sundays excepted) at 5 p. m. 

STEAMSHIP LINES. 

Alaska— Pacific Coast S. S. Co. , For Sitka, Fort Wran- 
gel, and Harrisburgh, via Port Townsend and Victoria. 
Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street, Wharf foot of 
Broadway. 

Australia— Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For Sydney, via Hon- 
olulu and Auckland. Ticket Office and Wharf corner 
First and Brannan Streets. 

British Columbia— Pacific Coast S. S. Co., For Victoria, 
connecting with steamers for Skagit River, Cassiar Mines', 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICENITT. 119 



Nanaimo, New Westminster, Yale, etc. Ticket Office 
214 Montgomery Street, Wharf foot of Broadway. 

Central America— Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For San Jose 
de Guatemala, Libertad, and Panama. Ticket Office and 
Wharf corner of First and Brannan Streets. 

Japan and China— Occidental and Oriental S. S. Co., 
For Yokohama and Hongkong, connecting at Y'okohama 
with steamers for Shanghai. Ticket Office N. E. corner 
Fourth and Townsend Streets, Wharf corner First and 
Brannan Streets. 

Japan and China -Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For Yokohama 
and Hongkong, connecting at Yokohama with steamers 
for Hiogo, Nagasaki, and Shanghai. Ticket Office and 
Wharf corner First and Brannan Streets. 

Mexican Coast— California and Mexican S. S. Line, For 
Ensenada, Magdalena Bay, Cape St. Lucas, Mazatlan, La 
Paz, and Guaymas. Ticket Office 10 Market Street, 
Wharf foot of Washington Street. 

Mexican Coast— Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For Mazatlan, 
San Bias, Manzanillo, and Acapulco, thence to Panama. 
Ticket Office and Wharf corner First and Brannan Streets. 

New York via Panama— Pacific Mail S. S. Co. Ticket 
Office and Wharf corner First and Brannan Streets. 

New Zealand— Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For Auckland via 
Honolulu. Ticket Office and Wharf corner First and 
Brannan Streets. 

Northern Coast of California— Pacific Coast S. S. Co., 
For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton. Ticket Office 214 
Montgomery Street, Wharf foot of Broadway. 

Northern Coast of California— Steamer Humboldt, For 
Eureka, Areata, and Hookton. Ticket Office 22 Califor- 
nia Street, Wharf foot of Jackson Street. 

Northern Coast of California— Steamer Ferndale, For 
Eureka, Areata, and Hookton. Office 27 Market Street, 
Wharf foot of Washington Street. 

Northern Coast of California— Pacific Coast S. S. Co., 
For Punta Arenas, Cuffey's Cove, Little River, Whites- 



120 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



bore, and Mendocino. Ticket Office 214 Montgomery- 
Street, Wharf foot of Broadway. 

Northern Coast of California— Steamer Mary D. Hume, 
For Trinidad, Crescent City, and Smith's River. Ticket 
Office 405 Front Street, Wharf foot of Washington Street. 
Northern Coast of California— Steamer Crescent City, 
For Trinidad and Crescent City. Ticket Office 11 Beale 
Street, Wharf foot of Howard Street. 

Oregon— Oregon Railway and Navigation Co., For As- 
toria and Portland. Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street, 
Wharf foot of Spear Street. 

Oregon— Steamer Mary D. Hume, For Chetco, Ellens- 
burg, and Port Orford. Ticket Office 405 Front Street, 
Wharf foot of Washington Street. 

Oregon— Steamer Areata, For Empire City and Marsh- 
field. Ticket Office 7 Spear Street, Wharf foot of Howard 
Street. 

Sandwich Islands— Oceanic S. S. Co., For Honolulu. 
Ticket Office 327 Market Street, Wharf foot of Harrison 
Street. 

Sandwich Islands— Pacific Mail S. S. Co., For Honolulu, 
thence to Auckland and Sydney. Ticket Office and 
Wharf corner First and Brannan Streets . 

Southern Coast of California— Pacific Coast S. S. Co., 
For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Gaviota, 
San Buenaventura, Port Harford, San Luis Obispo, Santa 
Barbara, San Pedro, Los Angeles, and San Diego. Ticket 
Office 214 Montgomery Street, AVharf foot of Broad- 
way. 

Washington Territory— Pacific Coast S. S. Co., For 
Port Townsend, Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, and Steila- 
coom, via Victoria. Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street, 
Wharf foot of Broadway. 

Washington Territory — Steamer Empire, For Port 
Townsend, Seattle, New Tacoma, and Olympia. Offices 
118 Pacific Street and 10 California Street, Wharf foot of 
Pacific Street. 



Gl'roE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 121 

ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP AGENCIES. 

Througli tickets to and from the principal cities of Great 
Britain and Europe via the steamers of the following lines 
can be purchased in this city : 

Allan (Boston and Quebec to Queenstown and Liver- 
pool), C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

American (Philadelphia to Liverpool), C. P. R. R. Ticket 
Office, Oakland Ferry, and 116 Montgomery Street. 

Anchor (New York to Glasgow), C. P. R. R. Ticket Of- 
fice, Oakland Ferry. 

Compagnie Generale Transatlantic! Lie (New York to 
Havre), 524 Montgomery Street and 5 Montgomery Ave- 
nue. 

Cunard (New York to Queenstown and Liverpool), 202 
Market Street, and C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland 
Ferry. 

Guion (New York to Queenstown and Liverpool), C. P. 
R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

Hamburg American (New York to Hamburg), 401 Cali- 
fornia Street, and C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland 
Ferry. 

Inman (New York to Queenstown and Liverpool), C. P. 
R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry, and 5 Montgomery 
Avenue. 

Italian (New York to Gibraltar, Marseilles, and Paler- 
mo), C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

Ligne Commerciale Francaise (New Orleans to Havre), 
C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

National (New York to Queenstown, Liverpool, and 
London), C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry, and 
116 Montgomery Street. 

North German Lloyd (New York to Bremen), 314 Sacra- 
mento Street, and C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland 
Ferry. 

North German Lloyd (Baltimore to Bremen), 307 Cali- 
fornia Street. 



122 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Red Star (Philadelphia and New York to Antwerp), C. 
P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry, and 116 Montgomery 
Street. 

Rotterdam (New York to Rotterdam and Amsterdam), 
C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

Royal Mail Steam Packet (Aspinwall to Plymouth and 
Southampton, via West Indies), 319 California Street. 

State (New York to Glasgow), C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, 
Oakland Ferry. 

White Star (New Y''ork to Queenstown and Liverpool), 
C. P. R. R. Ticket Office, Oakland Ferry. 

ROUTES OF TRAVEL 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO PRINCIPAL TOWNS AND SUMMER 
RESORTS IN CALIFORNIA. 

Abbreviations.— C. N., California Northern Railroad; C. P., Central 
Pacific Railroad; Cal. P., California Pacific Railroad; N., Northern 
Railway; N. P. C, North Pacific Coast Railroad; P. C, Pacific 
Coast Steamships; S. & C, Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad; 
S. C, Santa Cruz Railroad ; S. F. »fc N. P., San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railroad; S. P., Southern Pacific Railroad; S. P. C, South 
Pacific Coast Railroad; S. & P., Sacramento and Placerville Railroad. 

Adams Springs, Lake Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calistoga, 
73 miles; stage, 31 miles; R. R. fare, S3.50. 

^tna Hot Springs, Napa Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to St. 
Helena, 64 miles ; stage, 16 miles ; R. R. fare, S3. 

Alameda, Alameda Co.— C. P., 11 miles; fare, 15 cents; 
or S. P. C, 10 miles; fare, 15 cents. 

Allen Springs, Lake Co.— C. P. and N., 125 miles; stage, 
40 miles; R. R. fare, ^.75. 

Anaheim, Los Angeles Co.— C. P. and S. P., 508 miles; 
fare, $24.50; or P. C. Steamers to Anaheim Landing, 
396 miles; stage, 13 miles; fare, $20. 

Anderson's Springs, Lake Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calis- 
toga, 73 miles; stage, 19 miles; R. R. fare, S3.50. 

Antioch, Contra Costa Co.— C. P. and N., 55 miles; fare, 
$1.50. 



GUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 123 



Aptos, Santa Cruz Co.— S. P. and S. C, 112 miles; fare, 
$3.50; or P. C. Steamers. 

Areata, Humboldt Co. — P. C. Steamers, or Steamer Hum- 
boldt to Eureka, 220 miles; steamer or stage, 12 miles; 
fare, 310.75. 

Auburn, Placer Co.— C. P., 126 miles; fare, S6.50. 

Bakersfield, Kern Co.— C. P. and S. P. to Sumner, 3U 
miles; stage, 1 mile; fare, 317. 

Bartlett Springs, Lake Co.— S. F. andN. P. to Cloverdale, 
84 miles; stage, 66 miles; R R. fare, $4.25; or Cal. P. to 
Calistoga, 73 miles; stage, 46 miles; R. R. fare, $3.50. 

Belmont, San Mateo Co.— S. P., 25 miles; fare, 90 cents. 

Benicia, Salano Co.— C. P. and N., 33 miles; fare, $1. 

Berkeley, Alameda Co.— C. P., 11 miles; fare, 20 cents. 

Big Trees, Calaveras Co. — C. P. to Stockton, 92 miles; S. 
& C. to Milton, 30 miles; stage, 44 miles; fare, $11.50. 

Big Trees, Mariposa Co. (see route to Yosemite). 

Big Trees, Santa Cruz Co.— S. P. C, 75 miles; fare, 
$3.25. 

Bodie, Mono Co.— C. P. to Reno, 246 miles; Virginia & 
Truckee R. R. and Carson & Colorado R. R. to Haw- 
thorne, 141 miles; stage, 37 miles; fare, $34.75. 

Brooklyn (or East Oakland), Alameda Co.— C. P., 9 miles; 
fare, 15 cents. 

Calistoga (or Calistoga Springs), Napa Co.— 0. P. and Cal. 
P., 73 miles ; fare, 3.60. 

Castroville, Monterey Co.— S. P., 109 miles ; fare, $3.50. 

Chico, Butte Co.— C. P., 235 miles; fare, $8.50. 

Cloverdale, Sonoma Co.— S. F. & N. P., 84 miles; fare, 
$4.25. 

Colfax, Placer Co.— C. P., 144 miles; fare, $7.75. 

Colton, San Bernardino Co.— C. P. and S. P., 640 miles; 
fare, $26. 

Colusa, Colusa Co.— Cal. P. and N. to Williams, 126 miles; 
stage, 10 miles; fare, $7.75. 

Crescent City, Del Norte Co. — Steamers Crescent City or 
Mary D. Hume, 274 miles; fare, $12.50. 



124 GUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Crystal Springs, San Mateo Co.— S. P. to San Mateo, 21 
miles; stage, 4 miles; Pw. R. fare, 75 cents. 

Dixon, Solano Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 69 miles; fare, S3.25. 

Donner Lake, Nevada Co.— C. P. to Summit, 195 miles; 
stage, 2 miles; fare, S13.70. 

Downieville, Sierra Co.— C. P. to Marysville, 191 miles; 
stage, 67 miles; fare, 815.50. 

Duncan's Mills, Sonoma Co.— N. P. C, 80 miles; fare, 
S3. 75. 

Dutch Flat, Placer Co.— C. P., 157 miles; fare, S8.95. 

East Oakland, Alameda Co.— C. P., 9 miles; fare, 15 cents. 

Elmira, Solano Co.— C. P. and Cal. P-, 60 miles; fare, S2.75. 

Eureka, Humboldt Co.— P. C. Steamers or Steamer Hum- 
boldt, 220 miles ; fare, SIO. 

Fairfield, Solano Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Suisun, 49 
miles; fare, 82.25. 

Felton, Santa Cruz Co.— S. P. C, 73 miles; fare 83.25. 

Folsom, Sacramento Co.— C. P. to Sacramento, 90 miles; 
S. & P. 21 miles; fare, 85.50. 

Fresno, Fresno Co.— C. P., 207 miles; fare, 811.35. 

Gait, Sacramento Co.— C. P., 112 miles ;5f are, 84. 

Georgetown, El Dorado Co.— C. P. to Auburn, 126 miles ; 
stage, 18 miles ; fare, 89.50. 

Geyser Springs, Sonoma Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calis- 
toga, 73 miles; stage, 27 miles; fare, 87.50; or S. F. & N. 
P. to Cloverdale, 84 miles; stage, 16 miles; fare, 87.50. 

GeyserviUe, Sonoma Co.— S. F. & N. P., 74 miles; fare, 
83.50. 

Gilroy, Santa Clara Co.— S. P., 80 mUes; fare, 83.25. 

Gilroy Hot Springs, Santa Clara Co.— S. P., 80 miles; 
stage, 14 miles ; fare, 85. 

Grass Valley, Nevada Co.— C. P. to Colfax, 144 miles; Ne- 
vada Co. P. P., 17 miles; fare, 89.50. 

Harbin Springs, Lake Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calistoga, 
73 miles; stage, 24 miles; fare, 85.70. 

Haywards, Alameda Co.— C. P., 21 miles; fare, 65 cents. 

Healdsburg, Sonoma Co.— S. F. &N. P., 66 miles; fare, 83. 



GUIDE TO SAN FBAJSXISCO AKD VICINITY. 125 



Highland Springs, Lake Co.— S. F. &N. P., to Cloverdale, 

84 miles; stage, 22 miles; fare, .56.50. 
Hollister, San Benito Co.— S. P., 94 miles; fare, S4. 
Hornitos, Mariposa Co.— C. P. to Merced, 152 miles; stage, 

22 miles; fare, §11. 
lone, Amador Co.— C. P., 139 miles; fare, S6.25. 
Iowa Hall, Placer Co.— C. P. to Colfax, 144 miles; stage, 

8 miles ; fare, 89.25. 
Jackson, Amador Co.— C. P. to lone, 139 miles; stage, 12 

miles; fare, $8.25. 
Kernville, Kern Co.— C. P. and S. P. to Caliente, 336 miles; 

stage, 40 miles; fare, 324. 
Knight's Landing, Yolo Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 95 mUes; 

fare, H.75. 
Knoxville, Napa Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calistoga, 73 

miles ; stage, 28 miles ; fare §8.50. 
La Porte, Plumas Co.— C. P. to Marysville, 191 miles; 

C. N. to Oroville, 28 miles; stage, 45 miles; fare, $15.50. 
Lake Tahoe (or Lake Bigler), Placer Co.— C. P. to Truckee, 

209 miles; stage, 14 miles; fare, 816.50. 
Lakeport, Lake Co.— S. F. &N. P. to Cloverdale, 84 miles; 

stage, 32 miles; fare 86.50; or C. P. and Cal. P. to Cal- 
istoga, 73 miles; stage, 47 miles; fare, 86.50. 
Lathrop, San Joaquin Co.— C. P. 94 miles; fare, $3.50. 
Lincoln, Placer Co.— C. P. 168 miles; fare, 85.50. 
Litton Springs, Sonoma Co.- S. F. & N. P., 70 miles ; fare, 

83.25. 
Livermore, Alameda Co.— C. P., 48 miles; fare, 81.75. 
Lodi, San Joaquin Co.— C. P., 104 miles; fare, 83.75. 
Lompoc, Santa Barbara Co.— P. C. Steamers to Gaviota, 

260 miles; stage, 14 miles; fare, 812. 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co.— C. P. and S. P., 482 miles; 

fare, 823. 
Los Gatos, Santa Clara Co.— S. P. C. 56 miles; fare, 82.15. 
Lower Lake, Lake Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Calistoga, 73 

miles; stage, 35 miles; fare, 86.50. 
Madera, Fresno Co.— C. P., 185 miles; fare, 89.80. 



126 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

Mariposa, Mariposa Co. — C. P. to Merced, 152 miles; stage, 
41 miles ; fare, ^13. 

Mark West Hot Sulphur Springs, Sonoma Co.— S. F. & 
N. P. to Santa Rosa, 51 miles; stage, 8 miles; R. R. 
fare, ^2. 

Martinez, Contra Costa Co. — C. P. and N., 36 miles; 
fare, $1. 

Marysville, Yuba Co.— C. P., 191 miles; fare, S^o.oO. 

Mayfield, Santa Clara Co.— S. P., 35 miles; fare, .^1.25. 

Mendocino City, Mendocino Co.— S. F. & N. P. to Clover- 
dale, 84 miles; stage, 76 miles; fare, S9.50; or N. P. C. 
to Duncan's Mills, 80 miles; stage, 94 miles; fare, $10; 
or P. C. Steamers, 122 miles; fare, $9. 

Menlo Park, San Mateo Co.— S. P., 32 miles; fare, 31.15. 

Merced, Merced Co.— C. P., 152 miles; fare, $7.50. 

Modesto, Stanislaus Co.— C. P. 114 miles; fare, $4.90. 

Mokehimne Hill, Calaveras Co. — C. P. to lone, 139 miles; 
stage, 18 miles; fare, $8.75. 

Monterey, Monterey Co. — S. P., 125 miles; fare, $3.50; or 
P. C. Steamers, 85 miles; fare $3. 

Mount Eden, Alameda Co.— S. P. C, 21 miles; fare, 65 cts. 

Mount Diablo, Contra Costa Co. — C. P. and N. ro Marti- 
nez, 36 miles; saddle or stage, 18 miles; R. R. fare, $1. 

Mount Tamalpais, Marin Co.— N. P. C. to San Rafael, 15 
miles; saddle, 12 miles; R. R. fare, 50 cents. 

Napa City, Napa Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 47 miles; fare, $2. 

Napa Soda Springs, Napa Co.— C. P. and Cal. P. to Napa 
City, 47 miles; stage, 6 miles; K. R. fare, $2. 

Natividad, Monterey Co. — S. P. to Salinas, 118 miles; 
stage, 6 miles; R. R. fare, $5.50. 

Nevada City, Nevada Co.— C. P. to Colfax, 144 miles; Ne- 
vada Co. R. R., 22 miles; fare, $10. 

Newark, Alameda Co.— S. P. C, 30 miles; fare, 90 cents. 

Niles, Alameda Co.— C. P., 30 miles; fare, $1. 

North San Juan, Nevada Co.— C. P. to Colfax, 144 miles ; 
Nevada Co. R. R. to Nevada City, 22 miles; stage, 12 
miles; fare, $11.50. 



GUmR TO SAN nU-NCISCO AND VICINITY. 127 



Nortonville, Contra Costa Co.— C. P. and N. 56 miles; 

fare, $2. 
Oakland, Alameda Co.— C. P., 8 miles; fare, 15 cents; or 

S. P. C, 8 miles; fare, 15 cents. 
Orange, Los Angeles Co.— C. P. and S. P., 514 miles; fare, 

S25. 
Oroville, Butte Co.— C. P. to Marysville, 191 miles; C. N"., 

28 miles; fare, S7.50. 
Pacheco, Contra Costa Co.— C. P. and N. to Martinez, 36 

miles; stage, 5 miles; fare, .^1.50. 
Pacific Congress Springs, Santa Clara Co.— S. P. C. to Los 

Gatos, 56 miles; stage, 6 miles; fare, 82.75. 
Paraiso Springs, Monterey Co.— S. P. to Soledad, 143 miles; 

stage, 7 miles; fare, S7.50. 
Paso Robles Hot Springs, San Luis Obispo Co.— S. P. to 

Soledad, 143 miles; stage, 84 miles; fare, 814. 
Pearson Springs, Lake Co.— S. F. & N. P. to Cloverdale, 

84 miles; stage, 46 miles; fare, 89.75. 
Pescadero, San Mateo Co.— S. P. to San Mateo, 21 miles; 

stage, 32 miles; fare, 83.50. 
Petaluma, Sonoma Co.— S. P. & N. P., 36 miles; fare, 81. 
Piedmont Springs, Alameda Co.— C. P. to Oakland, 8 

miles; horse-cars, 4 miles; fare, 25 cents. 
Placerville, El Dorado Co.— C. P. to Sacramento, 90 miles ; 

S. & P. to Shingle Springs, 48 miles; stage, 10 miles; 

fare, 89.50. 
Pleasautou, Alameda Co.— C. P., 42 miles; fare, 81.50. 
Punta Arenas, Mendocino Co.— N. P. C. to Duncan's 

Mills, 80 miles; stage, 60 miles; fare, 88; or P. C. 

Steamers, 100 miles; fare, 87. 
Quincy, Plumas Co.— C. P. to Marysville, 191 miles; C. IT. 

to Oroville, 28 miles; stage, 65 miles; fare, 817.50. 
Red Bluff, Tehama Co.— C. P., 274 miles; fare, 810.75. 
Redding, Shasta Co.— C. P., 309 miles; fare, 813.25. 
Redwood City, San Mateo Co.— S. P., 29 miles; fare, 81. 
Rio Vista, Solano Co.— Sacramento steamer, 89 miles; 

fare, 81.50. 



128 GULDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITr. 



Riverside, San Bernardino Co.— C. P. and S. P. to Colton, 

540 miles; stage, 8 miles; fare, S26.75. 
Eocklin, Placer Co.— C. P., 112 miles; fare, ^5.25. 
Rohnerville, Humboldt Co.— P. C. Steamers to Eureka, 

220 miles; stage, 20 miles: fare, .S12. 
Sacramento, Sacramento Co.— C. P. (Main Line), 90 miles; 

fare, $4; or steamer, 120 miles; fare, $1.50. 
Salinas, Monterey Co.— S. P., 118 miles; fare, S5.50; or 

P. C. Steamers. 
San Andreas, Calaveras Co.— C. P. to Stockton, 02 miles; 

S. & C. to Milton, 30 miles; stage, 22 miles; fare, $8. 
San Benito, San Benito Co.— S. P. to Tres Pinos, 100 miles; 

stage, 29 miles; fare, 67.50. 
San Bernardino, San Bernardino Co.— C. P. and S. P. to 

Colton, 540 miles; stage, 3 miles; fare, 826.50. 
San Buenaventura, Ventura Co.— C. P. and S. P. to Xew- 
hall, 452 miles; stage, 50 miles; fare, $28; or P. C. 
Steamers, 311 miles, fare, $12. 
San Diego, San Diego Co.— C. P. and S. P. to Colton, 540 
miles; California Southern R. P., 123 miles; fare, $32; 
or P. C. Steamers, 482 miles; fare, .S15. 
San Gabriel, Los Angeles Co.— C. P. and S. P., 491 miles; 

fare, .§23.50. 
San Jose, Santa Clara Co.— S. P., 50 miles; fare, $1.75; 
or S. P. C, 46 miles; fare, $1.75; or C. P., 48 miles; fare, 
$1.75. 
San Juan, San Benito Co.— S. P. to Sargent's, 86 miles; 

stage, 6 miles; fare, S4.25. 
San Leandro, Alameda Co.— C. P., 16 miles; fare, 40 cents; 

or S. P. C, 15 miles; fare, 40 cents. 
San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo Co.— S. P. to Soledad, 
143 miles; stage, 114 miles; fare, $14; or P. C. Steam- 
ers to Port Harford, 201 miles: rail, 11 miles; fare, 
$10.80. 
San Mateo, San Mateo Co.— S. P., 21 miles; fare, 75 cents. 
San Pablo, Contra Costa Co.— C. P. and K, 18 miles; fare, 
60 cents. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 129 



San Quentiu, Mariu Co.-N. P. C. Steamer, 12 miles; fare, 

40 cents. 
San Rafael, Marin Co.-N. P. C, 15 miles; fare, 50 cents. 
Santa Ana, Los Angeles Co.-C. P. and S. P., 516 miles; 

fare, 825. 
Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co.-P. C. Steamers, 288 

miles; fare, $10; or C. P. and S. P. to Newhall, 452 

miles; stage, 78 miles; fare, S30. 
Santa Clara, Santa Clara Co.— S. P. C, 44 miles; fare, 

31.65; or S. P., 47 miles; fare, S1.65. 
Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Co.-S. P. C, 80 miles; fare, ^3.50; 

or S. P. and S. C, 121 miles; fare, S3.50; or P. C. 

Steamers, 70 miles; fare, §2.50. 
Santa Monica, Los Angeles County.— C. P. and S. P., 498 

miles; fare, $24. 
Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co.— S. F. & X. P., 51 miles; fare, $2. 
Saratoga, Santa Clara Co.-S. P. C. to Los Gatos, 56 miles; 

stage, 5 miles; fare, S2.75. 
Saucelito, Marin Co.— N. P. C. Steamer, 6 miles; fare, 25 

cents. 
Shasta,' Shasta Co.-C. P. to Redding, 309 miles; stage, 6 

miles; fare, $14.25. 
Skaggs's Springs, Sonoma Co.-S. F. & N. P. to Geyser- 

ville, 74 miles; stage, 8 miles; fare, $4.50. 
Snelling, Merced Co.-C. P. to Merced, 152 miles; stage, 

16 miles; fare, $9.50. 
Somersville, Contra Costa Co.-C. P. &N., 56 miles; fare, 

$2. 
Sonoma, Sonoma Co.— Sonoma Valley R. R., 38 miles; 

fare, $1. 
Sonora, Tuolumne Co.— C. P. to Stockton, 92 miles; S. & 

C. to Milton, 30 miles; stage, 35 miles; fare, 9. 
Soquel, Santa Cruz Co.— S. P. and S. C, 116 miles; fare, 

$3.50; or P. C. Steamers. 
Spanishtown, San Mateo Co.-S. P. to San Mateo, 21 miles; 

stage, 13 miles; fare, $1.75. 
St. Helena, Napa Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 04 miles; fare, S3. 



130 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Stockton, San Joaquin Co.— C. P., 92 miles; fare, $3 50. 
Suisun, Solano Co.-C. P. and Cal. P., 50 miles ; fare, ^2 25 
Susan ville, Lassen Co.-C. P. to Chico, 235 miles; stage 

85 miles; fare, .S17.50. 
Tehama, Tehama Co.— C. P. and X., 188 miles ; fare, $10. 
Tomales, Marin Co.— N. P. C, 56 miles; fare, 82. 
Truckee, Nevada Co.-C. P., 209 miles; fare, S14. 
Tulare, Tulare Co.-C. P. and S. P., 251 miles; fare, §14.45. 
Ukiah, Mendocino Co— S. F. & N. P. to Cloverdale, 84 

miles; stage, 31 miles; fare, .S7.25. 
Vallejo, Solano Co.-C. P. and Cal. P., 32 miles; fare, $1. 
Visalia, Tulare Co.-C. P., 249 miles; fare, §14.45. 
Volcano, Amador Co.— C. P. to lone, 139 miles; stage, 25 

miles; fare, $10. 
Warm Springs, Alameda Co.-C. P., 37 miles; fare, 81.40. 
Watsonville, Santa Cruz Co.— S. P. and S. C, lOl'miles; 

fare, 3.50. 
WeaverviUe, Trinity Co.— C. P. to Redding, 309 miles; 

stage, 46 miles; fare, 820.25. 
Webber Lake, Sierra Co.-C. P. to Truckee, 209 miles; 

stage, 26 miles; fare, 817. 
West Berkeley, Alameda Co.— C. P., 10 miles; fare, 20 

cents. 

West Oakland, Alameda Co.— C. P., 6 miles; fare, 15 cts. 

Wheatland, Yuba Co.— C. P., 179 miles: fare, 85.50. 

Wilbur's Hot Springs, Colusa Co.— Cal. P. and N. to Wil- 
liams, 125 miles; stage, 40 miles: fare, 810. 

Wilmington, Los Angeles Co.— P. C. Steamers, 391 miles; 
fare, 814; or C. P. and S. P., 5(M miles; fare, 823.50. 

Woodland, Yolo Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 86 miles; fare, 
84.25. 

Yolo, Yolo Co.— C. P. and Cal. P., 91 miles; fare, 84.60. 

Yosemite, Mariposa Co.— C. P. to Madera, 185 miles; stage 
via Mariposa Big Trees, 90 miles; or C. P. to Merced, 
152 miles; stage via Mariposa Big Trees, 102 miles; or 
C. P. to Stockton, 92 miles; S. & C. to Milton, 30 miles; 
stage, 88 miles; fare by either route, 834.80; round trip, 



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GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 131 



$55; or C. P. to Stockton, 92 miles; S. & C. to Milton, 

30 miles; stage via Calaveras Grove, 155 miles; fare, 

$42.80: round trip, §63. 
Yreka, Siskiyou Co.— C. P. to Redding, 309 miles; stage, 

114 miles; fare, $30.50. 
Yuba City, Sutter Co.-C. P., 190 miles; fare, S5.50. 

PROMINENT LOCALITIES. 

Alcatraz Island— Two miles nortli-west of Telegraph 
Hill, is strongly fortified, and occupied by the U. S. Gov- 
ernment as a military post. (See Military Posts and For- 
tifications.) 

Angel Island — A short distance beyond Alcatraz 
Island, is also owned and occupied by the TJ. S. Govern- 
ment as a military post. (See Military Posts and Fortifi- 

j cations. ) 

1 Bay View— A pretty locality east of the San Bruno 
Road near the San Mateo County line. In the vicinity are 
several vegetable gardens, which present quite an attract- 
ive appearance. It can be reached by the cars of the 
Potrero and Bay View R. R. from the foot of Fourth 
Street, or by a pleasant drive over the San Bruno Road. 

Ber'nal Heights— South of Twenty-sixth Street be- 
tween the San Bruno and San Jose Roads. From the top 
of the heights a fine view of the city and surrounding 
country may be obtained. Can be reached by the cars 
running through Market and Valencia, Mission, Howard, 
and Folsom Streets. 

Black Point, or Point San Jose— On the bay-shore 
near the foot of Van Xess Avenue, is a military reserva- 
tion, occupied by the U. S. Government. (See Military 
Posts and Fortifications.) 

Cliff House— A noted resort located at the termination 
of Point Lobos Avenue, about six miles distant from the 
New City Hall. From this point may be obtained a mag- 
nificent view of the Pacific Ocean, dotted with vessels of 



132 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 



every kmd and nationality passing to and from the 

!l c ^^^^^' "^^"^ ""^^"^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ i^ plain sight are 
tue beal Rocks, a favorite rendezvous for sea-lions On 
a clear day may also be seen the Farallones, a group of 
small islands situated about twenty-five miles distant. 
Ihe Cliff can be reached at a trifling expenditure by tak- 
ing the Geary Street cars to their terminus on Point lobos 
Avenue, which connect at this point with a line of omni- 
buses running regularly throughout the day. If a private 
conveyance is preferred, it may be reached by several 
roads affording splendid drives, the most direct route be- 
mg through Geary Street and Point Lobos Avenue. 

Fairmount-A pleasant and elevated tract of land 
west of the San Jose Eoad, near Thirtieth Street, occupied 
principally by families who desire a cheap and quiet home 
on the outskirts of the city. Reached by the Market and 
Valencia Street cars. 

FaraUones-A group of small islands consisting of 
the ISorth, Middle, and South Farallon, situated about 
twenty-six miles west of the entrance to the harbor 
Ihey extend in a direction nearly parallel with the coast 
and serve as landmarks to navigators approaching San 
Francisco Bay. On the highest point of the South Faral- 
lon the Government has erected a lighthouse of the first 
order, and about six hundred feet distant near the shore 
a fog signal. The islands are frequented by thousands of 
sea-hons, some of which are of enormous size. Sea-birds 
of different kinds also congregate here in large numbers 
some building nests of brush and sea-weeds, %vhile others 
lay their eggs on the bare rocks. None of the birds are 
considered fit for food, but the eggs of some are collected 
m large quantities at certain seasons of the year and sent 
to San Francisco for sale. There is no regular communi- 
cation with the islands, but parties having a curiosity to 
visit them can on a fine day secure the services of a small 
sailing vessel to take them there. 
Fort Point-Now called by the Government Fort 



GUIDB TO SAN FRA2JCISCO AND VICINITY. 133 



Winfield Scott, is a fortress situated on the southern 
shore of the Golden Gate. (See Military Posts and Forti- 
tications.) 

Golden Gate— The entrance to the harbor of San 
Francisco, is a strait about five miles in length and two 
miles in average width. A fine view of it can be obtained 
from Fort Point and the heights in the vicinity. 

Hayes Valley— A portion of the city north of Market 
and west of Larkin Streets, which has been known by this 
name since early days. It is now laid out in streets and 
thickly settled. 

Hunter's Point— A long and narrow strip of land in 
the extreme south-eastern portion of the city. On this 
point is located the California Dry Dock, which will ac- 
commodate vessels of the largest class. The cars of the 
Potrero and Bay View R. R. convey passengers to within 
a short distance of it. 

Islais Creek Bridge— Extends from Kentucky Street 
on the Potrero to First Avenue, South San Francisco. 
The cars of the Potrero and Bay View R. R. pass over it. 
Laguna de la Merced— A large lake in the south- 
western portion of the county near the Pacific Ocean. Can 
be reached by a drive over the Point Lobos and Ocean 
Beach roads, as well as by other roads leading to the 
Ocean House. 

Laguna Honda— ]^ear the Mission Ocean House Road, 
about four miles south-west of the New City Hall. At 
this point is located one of the main reservoirs of the 
Spring Valley Water Works, with a capacity of 34,000,000 
gallons. Can be reached by a drive over the Mission 
or Central Ocean House roads. 

Lime Point— In Marin County, on the northern shore 
of the Golden Gate. Can be reached from Saucelito by a 
drive along the shore of the bay. 

Lone Mountain— A high peak south of Point Lobos 
Avenue, near Odd Fellows Cemetery. On the summit is 
a large cross, which can be seen at a long distance. 



134 



GUIDK TO SAN FBANCIgCO IlKD VICENTTY. 



Long Bridge— Extends across the mouth of Mission 
Creek from the foot of Fourth Street to the Potrero. A 
walk over it affords a good view of a portion of the city 
and bay. 

Mission Dolores-This mission was founded in the 
year 1776 by Friars Francisco Palou and Benito Cambon. 
Soon afterwards the adobe church which still stands at 
the corner of Sixteenth and Dolores Streets was erected, 
and has ever since been used as a place of worship. The 
following description of the old edifice and churchyard is 
taken from the " San Francisco Chronicle." 

" Through large swinging doors, over which are three 
bells of ancient date, strapped to the rafters by means of 
rawhide, one passes into the interior— a long, narrow 
room, sufficiently dark to throw a ghostly light upon its 
contents, and make the unaccustomed visitor feel slight- 
ly uncomfortable. Passing between two rows of seats 
one comes to the altar, which has been studiously kept 
from harm, and still looks bright and pleasing. The con- 
stant repairing has kept the church from falling into 
ruin, and it is difficult to credit the story of its age. To 
be sure, the plastering is cracked and peeled off in places, 
the boards are worn down, and the painting needs re- 
newing; but these defects are common to more recently 
built churches as well. An accident has recently befall- 
en one of the statues of the saints, of which three are 
ranged on each of the side walls, it having fallen down 
with its pedestal, and for want of better accommodations 
bemg now placed upon a wooden chair. The paintings 
of the Last Supper and other sacred subjects still adorn 
the right-hand wall, but two sections are wanting, no 
trace of them having been discovered. The pillars of 
the side altars are a little disjointed; but this finishes the 
hst of glaring defects. The church-yard is entered through 
a small, tumble-down gate to the left of the church. A 
more neglected, desolate place it would be hard to find 
Here are found graves of which but the vestiges remain 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 135 



bearing scarce a semblance to the last resting place of 
the dead. True, a few worm-eaten, decayed wooden 
pickets, or perchance a rusty iron railing, yet exist; 
and a board, bleached by the many years which have 
rolled over it, is yet to be found. The marble headstones 
have sunk into the ground, or lie in the midst of a con- 
fused heap of weeds and rubbish. 

" Since the first burial, one hundred and seven years 
have rolled by, and thousands have found their last rest- 
ing place in the Mission graveyard. The first grave is 
Btill well preserved, and one of the few which, though 
not taken care of, is not in a state of dilapidation. On a 
small cross deeply planted in the ground can still be 
read the name of ' Sanchez,' engraved on a silver plate." 
Can be reached by the Valencia Street branch of the 
Market Street Eailway. 

Mountain Lake— A small sheet of water near the 
southern boundary of Presidio Reservation. 

North Beach— From foot of Powell Street west to 
Black Point. 

Ocean House— Near Laguna de la Merced, seven 
miles south-west of the City Hall. The roads leading to 
this place afford pleasant drives, and are much frequent- 
ed by pleasure-seekers. 

Point Lobos— On the ocean shore a short distance 
north of the Cliff House. From a telegraph station lo- 
cated here the arrival of inward-bound vessels are tele- 
graphed to the Merchants' Exchange. It is reached by 
the way of Point Lobos Avenue. 

Potrero— This is the name given to that portion of the 
city bounded by Channel Street, Potrero Avenue, Islais 
Creek, and the bay of San Francisco. In this section are 
located the Pacific Rolling Mills, San Francisco Cordage 
Factory, California Sugar Refinery, and Potrero Distil- 
lery, also other establishments severally engaged in the 
manufacture of soap, matches, oleomargarine, animal 
charcoal, etc. Can be reached from the foot of Fourth 



136 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Street by a walk over Long Bridge, or by the Potrero and 
Bay View cars. 

Presidio Reservation-Comprises a large area of 
land west of Baker Street, fronting on the bay and 
ocean. (See Military Posts and Fortifications. ) 

Rincon Hill-Foot of Harrison Street overlooking 
the bay. It is a pleasant section of the city, and contains 
some pretty residences. 

Russian HHl-The summit of this hill is on the line 
of Vallejo Street, between Taylor and Jones. It is one 
of the highest points in the city, and affords a magnificent 
view of the bay and surrounding country. It can be 
conveniently reached by taking the Clay Street Hill cars 
to the corner of Leavenworth and Clay, and from thence 
by a short walk through Leavenworth and Vallejo Streets 
to the summit. 

Seal Rooks— Located near the ocean shore, a short 
distance south of Point Lobos, is noted for the number of 
sea-lions that congregate there. They can be seen at all 
times of the day, either clambering over the rugged rocks, 
basking in the sun, or sporting in the water. A fine view 
of them can be obtained from the Cliff House, at the ter- 
mination of Point Lobos Avenue. 

South San Francisco - That portion of the city 
bounded by Islais Creek, San Bruno Road, San Mateo 
County, and the bay. On and near Islais Creek, in what 
is known as Butchertown, are several large slaughter- 
houses, which supply most of the meat consumed in the 
city. There are also a number of manufacturing estab- 
lishments in this section, including the California Silk 
Factory, several soap works and tanneries, and two 
breweries; one of these, the Albion, is owned by Burnell 
Brothers, who are extensively engaged in the manufac- 
ture of ale and porter, which is said to be equal if not 
superior to the best imported. On the shore of the bay 
are a number of ship-yards and marine ways, and a dry- 
dock of large dimensions. Occupying a beautiful site 



GUIDK TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 137 

near Bay View are the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum 
and St. Joseph's Infant Asylum, under the control of the 
Sisters of Charity. Can be reached by the Potrero and 
Bay View cars, which run at short intervals from the 
foot of Fourth Street, or by a pleasant drive via Potrero 
Avenue and the San Bruno Koad. 

Telegraph Hill— Is a rocky bluff about three hundred 
feet in height, situated north of Vallejo and east of Du- 
pont Streets. On a clear day the view from its summ^-t is 
grand and picturesque, embracing the bay and its ro- 
mantic shores, dotted here and there with pretty towns 
and hamlets, and in the distance, towering above all, the 
conical peak of Mount Diablo, four thousand feet above 
sea-level. Looking to the south and west may be seen 
a large portion of the city, its busy and noisy thorough- 
fares contrasting vividly with the quiet hills and valleys 
on the opposite side of the bay; and in a north-westerly 
direction the far-famed Golden Gate, enlivened by vessels 
of every kind passing to or from the metropolis of the 
Pacific. On the top of the hill is a small public square 
known as Pioneer Park, and also what is called the Tele- 
graph Hill Observatory, where visitors can obtain re- 
freshments, and, protected from the winds, enjoy the 
beautiful scenery. Can be reached without any great 
exertion by taking the North Beach cars to the corner of 
Powell and Greenwich Streets, thence by a short walk 
through Greenwich Street to the summit. 

Visitacion Valley — This is a small and fertile tract 
of land on the borders of San Mateo County, extending 
from the San Bruno Koad in a westerly direction. It is 
occupied principally by persons engaged in growing vege- 
tables and dairying. 

Yerba Bueua, or Goat Island— Is situated about 
midway between San Francisco and the Alameda County 
shore. It contains about two hundred acres, and is 
owned by the U. S. Government. A few years since, it 
attracted considerable attention, owing to an effort made 



138 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITr. 

by the Central Pacific R. E. Co. to obtain possession of 
it for a railroad terminus. On the island is a workshop, 
wliere buoys for the harbors on the coast are manufac- 
tured, and on the south-east point is located a lighthouse 
and fog signal. 

ALAMEDA, OAKLAND, ETC. 

Alameda— Alameda County, a pretty suburban town, 
situated opposite San Francisco in an easterly direction, 
on a strip of land some four miles in length, extending in 
peninsular form into the bay. Upon entering the town 
the mind is at once impressed with its very romantic 
beauty. It has wide and level streets, affording excellent 
drives, and the sturdy oak trees, donned with summer 
foliage, underspread with greensward, the neat and at- 
tractive dwellings surrounded with handsome gardens 
and lawns, combined with the pure and healthful atmos- 
phere, make it an inviting residence place for the busi- 
ness men of San Francisco. Its fine parks and numerous 
sea-bathing establishments also make it a favorite place 
of resort for pleasure-seekers. It has good public schools, 
including a high school, two grammar, and three primary, 
which have an average attendance of 1,000 pupils. The 
churches, which are well sustained, are represented by 
the Baptist, Congregational, Episcopal, Presbyterian, 
Methodist, German Eeformed, and Ptoman Catholic de- 
nominations. A free library and reading room is main- 
tained, having about 2,000 volumes, which is a neat and 
inviting resort for those who desire to gratify a literary 
taste. There are several secret and benevolent organiza- 
tions, including the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of 
Pythias, Ancient Order of United Workmen, Patriotic 
Order Sons of America, Independent OrJer of Chosen 
Friends, etc. Three well-conducted newspapers are pub- 
lished weekly. The number of inhabitants, according to 
the census of 1880, was 5,194, but at the present time is 



GXJIDE TO SAN FRAKCISCO AND VICINITY. 139 

estimated to be 8,500. It is reached via Oakland by the 
steamers and trains of the Central Pacific R. K., or via 
Alameda Point by the steamers and trains of the South 
Pacific Coast B. R. (See Ferry Time-tables, pages 144 
and 145 ) 

Berkeley— Alameda County, situated eleven miles 
from San Francisco in a north-easterly direction, occu- 
pies a picturesque site on slightly elevated and rolling 
ground, commanding a beautiful view of the bay and 
Golden Gate. It was incorporated as a town April 1st, 
1878, and now contains a population of about 2,500. The 
University of California, located in the outskirts of the 
town, is a handsome and commodious edifice, surrounded 
by beautiful grounds. This institution was incorporated 
by an Act of the Legislature in 1868, and is attended by 
students from every portion of the State. In the same 
vicinity is situated the Deaf and Dumb and Blind Insti- 
tute, a fine brick building three stories in height, erected 
at a cost, including grounds, of about 3150,000. Several 
manufacturing establishments, including oil, starch, 
chemical, sulphur, powder, and soap works, also a boot 
and shoe factory, give employment to quite a large num- 
ber of men. Two newspapers are published weekly; 
there is also a magazine and a small paper regularly is- 
sued by the students of the University. Two public 
schools are maintained, which are well attended. There 
are several churches, including two Episcopalian, two 
Presbyterian, a Methodist, and a Congregational. The 
secret societies are represented by lodges of Masons, Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. It is reached via Oakland Ferry and con- 
necting trains, which leave West Oakland at short inter- 
vals during the day (see Ferry Time-table, page 145), or 
via ferry and trains to Broadway, Oakland, and thence 
by a line of horse-cars. 

Oakland— Alameda County, an incorporated city and 
county seat, is situated on the eastern shore of the bay, 



140 GUIDE TO SAN TRANCISCO AND VICINITT, 

eight miles distant from the city of San Francisco. It 
was incorporated as a town May 11th, 1852, and chartered 
as a city March 25th, 1854. The place derives its name 
from the oak trees which cover the peninsula on which it 
is located, and whose delightful groves and romantic 
appearance first attracted attention to the spot as being a 
desirable place of residence and pleasure resort. The city 
is regularly laid out, with broad, macadamized streets, 
shaded with trees on either side. Flower-laden gardens 
ornament the cottage and the mansion, and handsome 
and substantial structures adorn the business thorough- 
fares. Xo place has more beautiful suburbs, and its drives 
are noted for their extent, variety, and charm. Telegraph 
and San Pablo Avenues, extending from the junction of 
Broadway and Fourteenth Street to Berkeley, are the 
great drive-ways on the north of the city, and from them 
radiate roads leading to picturesque localities in the sur- 
rounding hills. There are also beautiful drives leading 
to Piedmont Springs, a noted resort about four miles in 
a north-easterly direction from the City Hall. One of 
these is from Broadway through Central Avenue to a 
road running along the easterly shore of Lake Merritt, a 
pretty sheet of water which is a favorite resort for those 
who are fond of boating excursions. From the Piedmont 
Springs Hotel, located about four hundred feet above sea- 
level, a magnificent view of the bay and surrounding 
country is obtained. Near by, in a ravine filled with a 
luxuriant growth of trees and shrubbery is a romantic 
spot known as Bushy Dell. In this dell are the springs, 
three in number, from which flow about eight hundred 
gallons per hour of water, strongly impregnated with 
sulphur, iron, and magnesia. Other pleasant drives are 
to Alameda via the bridge, which extends across San 
Antonio ICreekj from the foot of Webster Street, and to 
Fruit Vale by a drive through East Oakland to Adams 
Avenue and the [San Leandro Eoad. The Mountain 
View Cemetery, which is beautifully laid out, and occu- 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 141 

pies a picturesque site, should also be visited. It is 
reached by a drive through Broadway and "Webster 
Street, or by a line of street cars running direct to the 
entrance. Besides the natural beauty of the surround- 
ings, Oakland lias a most delightful climate. Although 
but across the bay, the high winds of San Francisco 
diminish here to a light breeze, and the frequent fogs 
which roll over that city are hardly susceptible. It is 
principally noted as a city of homes, although its selec- 
tion as a railroad terminus infused a life current into 
the arteries of business, which has made it an impor- 
tant emiDorium of trade. The population, according to 
the census of 1880, was 34,456, and is now estimated at 
40,000. An excellent system of schools is maintained, 
both public and private, not to be excelled by any in the 
State. There are sixteen public schools, with an average 
daily attendance of about 6,000 scholars. Among the 
private institutions of learning are Snell's Seminary, 
Home Institute, and Convent of Our Lady of the Sacred 
Heart for girls, California Military Academy, and St. 
Joseph's Academy for boys, and the Pacific Theological 
Seminary, an institute of high order, conducted under the 
auspices of the Congregational Church. Several well- 
conducted daily and weekly journals disseminate the 
news of the day. Of societies, there are organized lodges 
of Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Red Men, 
United Workmen, Patriotic Order Sons of America, and 
Chosen Friends, besides a number of others of a social 
and benevolent character. The religious element is rep- 
resented by churches of the following denominations: 
Baptist, Congregational, Episcopal, Methodist, Presby- 
terian, Latter Day Saints, Seventh Day Adventists, 
Hebrew, and Eoman Catholic. A Free Library and Odd 
Fellows Library are maintained, which are well supplied 
with books and newspapers. Several manufacturing es- 
tablishments, including planing mills, flouring mills, iron 
works, potteries, tanneries, etc., and the various shops 



142 GUIDE TO SAN FKANCISCO AND VICINITT. 

belonging to the Central Pacific R. R. Co., give employ- 
ment to a large number of men. An efficient paid fire 
department and telegraph fire alarm are maintained. 
The city is illuminated with gas by the Oakland Gaslight 
Co., and furnished with an abundant supply of good 
water by the Contra Costa Water Co. A system of 
street railroads traverse the city, and afford cheap and 
frequent communication with suburban towns. From 
the Broadway station of the C. P. R. R. horse-cars leave 
every few minutes for Alameda, East Oakland, Berke- 
ley, Temescal, Piedmont Springs, and Mountain View 
Cemetery, The overland trains of the Central Pacific R. 
R. Co. leave daily, and local trains of this company 
leave every half-hour until seven o'clock in the evening, 
and thereafter hourly until eleven, for San Francisco. 
(See Ferry Time-tables, pages 144 and 145.) 

San Quentin— Marin County, is situated on San Quen- 
tin Point, twelve miles by water from San Francisco, and 
three miles by rail from San Rafael. It is principally 
noted as the seat of the State Penitentiary, which is a 
substantial brick edifice two hundred and forty by one 
hundred and thirty-four feet in dimensions. It contains 
within its walls at the present date about two thousand 
prisoners. The labor of the convicts is utilized in several 
branches of industry, the most prominent of which is the 
manufacture of jute bagging. The factory recently erected 
for this purpose contains one hundred looms, gives em- 
ployment to four hundred convicts, and turns out eight 
thousand sacks per day. The place maintains a public 
school, which ^has an attendance of about seventy-five 
scholars. The village and prison are supplied with gas 
and water brought in pipes from San Rafael. Communi- 
cation is maintained with San Francisco by water and 
San Rafael by rail. (See Ferry Time-table, page 118.) 

San Rafael — Marin County, an incorporated town and 
county seat, is situated in a small valley of the same 
name on the line of the North Pacific Coast Railroad, fif- 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 143 

teen miles north-west of San Francisco. It is a beautiful 
and picturesque spot, surrounded by an amphitheater of 
hills, except at the foot of the valley, where it opens to 
the bay. It is nicely laid out with streets lined with 
shade trees, and the many fine residences are adorned 
with delightful and tastily laid out grounds. Being so 
completely sheltered, it is free from wind, dust, and fog, 
and has an almost semi-tropical climate. It is but a short 
and pleasant ride from San Francisco, and the rare ad- 
vantages it offers for a suburban home have been availed 
of by many of the business men of that city. Its health- 
ful climate also makes it an excellent resort for invalids, 
and its park, gardens, and romantic nooks and retreats 
make it an attractive place for the pleasure-seeker. The 
town has a population of about 2,5C0 inhabitants. Three 
public schools are maintained, having an attendance of 
about 300 scholars. The secret and benevolent societies 
are the Masons, Odd Fellows, United Workmen, Legion 
of Honor, and Good Templars. The religious denomina- 
tions represented are the Episcopal, Presbyterian, Meth- 
odist, and Roman Catholic. The town contains a hand- 
some court-house, erected at a cost of 670,000. It is 
surrounded with grounds tastily laid out with trees, 
shrubbery, lawns, and tropical plants. The Son Rafael 
Gas Co. supplies the town with light, and excellent water 
is distributed by the Marin County AVater Co. Com- 
munication is maintained with San Francisco several 
times a day (see Ferry Time-table, page 118), and with 
Duncan's Mills daily by the trains of the North Pacific 
Coast R. R., and twice a day with Cloverdale and inter- 
mediate points by the trains of the San Francisco and 
North Pacific R. R. 

Saucelito — Marin County, occupies a pleasant site on 
the bay-shore six miles in a northerly direction from the 
city of San Francisco. Its picturesque surroundings and 
balmy climate, it being almost free from the high winds 
which often prevail in the city, make it a favorite resort 



144 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

for picnic parties and otlier pleasure-seekers. From the 
village extend several roads and paths leading to roman- 
tic spots in the vicinity, where, on pleasant days, particu- 
larly on Sundays, may be seen hundreds of visitors from 
the city, rambling over the green sward and througli the 
pretty groves, or climbing to the summit of the hills to 
obtain a view of the enchanting scenery. Previous to the 
discovery of gold, what is now known as old Saucelito 
was frequented by whalers and other vessels that entered 
the harbor for supplies of water and fuel. The trains of 
the North Pacific Coast R. Pt. leave daily for Point Eeyes 
and intermediate stations, and a steamer maintains com- 
munication with San Francisco (see Ferry Time-table, 
page 118). 

OAKLAND FERRY TIME-TABLE. 

Since printing Ferry Time-tables, pages 116 and 117, 
very important changes have been made by the Central 
Pacific E. E.. Co. Boats and trains now leave as follows: 

To Oakland and East Oakland— *6, *6:30, 7, 7:30,8, 
8:30, 9,9:30, 10, 10:30, 11, 11:30 a. m.; 12m.; 12:30, 1, 1:30, 
2, 2:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 4:30, 5, 5:30, 6, 6:30, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
*12 p. M. 

From East Oakland— *5 : 27, *5:57, 6:27, 6:57, 7:27, 
7:57, 8:27, 8:57, 9:27,9:57, 10:27,10:57,11:27, 11:57 a. m. ; 
12:27, 12:57, 1:27, 1:57, 2:27, 2:57, 3:27, 3:57, 4:27, 4:57, 
5:27, 5:57,6:27, 6:57, 7:57,8:57,9:57, 10:57 p.m. 

From Broadway, Oakland— *5 : 36, *6:06, 6:36, 7:06, 
7:36, 8:06, 8:36, 9:06, 9:36, 10:06, 10:3<3, 11:06, 11:36 
A. M.; 12:06, 12:36, 1:06, 1:36, 2:06,2:36, 3:06,3:36, 4:06, 
4:36, 5:06, 5:36, 6:06, 6:36, 7:06, 8:06, 9:06, 10:06 11:06 

p. M. 

To Alameda— *6, *6:30, 7, *7:30, 8, *8:30, 9, 9:30, 10, 
}10:30, 11, 111:30 A. M. ; 12 M. ; ^12: 30, 1, |1:30, 2, 3, 3:30 
4,4:30,5,5:30,6, 6:30,7,8, 9, 10, 11, *12 p. m. 

From Alameda— *5 : 22, *5 : 52, *6:22, 6:52, *7: 22, 7:52, 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 145 



•8-2'> 8-52 9:22, 9:52, J10:22, 10:52, tn:22, 11:52 a.m.; 
J12:22,12:52,n:22, 1:52,2:52,3:22,3:52,4:22,4:52,5:22, 

5-52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:52 P. M. 

To Fruit Yale-*6, ♦6:30, *7, *7:30, *8, *8:30 a. m.; 
*3:30, *4. *4:30, *5, ♦5:30, *6, ♦6:30, 9 P. M.; also via Ala- 
meda, ♦g : 30 a. M. ; 6 : 30, tn, *12 P. M. 

From Fruit Yale-^6: 20, ♦6:50, ♦7:20, ♦7:50, *8:20, 
♦8:50, ♦9:20, ^10:21 a. m.; ♦4:20, ♦4:50, ^5:20, ^5:50, ♦6:20, 
♦6:50,' 7:25, 9:50 P. m.; also via Alameda, ♦5:15, ♦5:45, 
16:45, t9:15 a. M. ; ^3:15?. M. 

To Berkeley-^6, ^6:30, 7. ^7 : 30, 8, *8 : 30, 9, ^9:30, 10. 
n0:30, 11, ni:30 A. m.; 12 m.; 1, 2, 3. 4, 4:30, 5, 5:30, 6, 
6:30, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, ♦12 P.M. . ^ ,. ^ ,k 

From Berkeley-^5:15, ^5:45, ♦6:15, 6:45, *7:15, 7:45, 
♦8-15, 8:45, t9: 15, 9:45, JIO: 15, 10:45, tll:15, 11:45 a.m.; 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45,5:15, 6:45, 6:15, 6:4o, 
7:45,8:45,9:45,10:45 p.m. 

To West Berkeley-^6, *6 : 30, 7, •7 : 30, J8, ^8 : 30, 9, 10, 
11 a. m.; tl,2,3,4,^4:30,5,*5:30,6,^6:30,7P.M. 

From West Berkeley— ♦S : 45, *6 : 15, 6 : 45, ♦! : 15, 7 : 4o, 
8:45, 19:15,9:45,10:45 A.M.; tl2: 45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4: 4o, 
♦5:15, 5:45, ^6: 15, 6:45, ^7: 15 p. m. 

Creek Eoute-To Oakland-*7 : 15, 9:15, 11:15 a. m.; 
1 : 15, 3 : 15, 5 : 15 P. M. From Oakland— ^6 : 15, 8 : 15, 10 : 15, 
a. m'.; 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 p.m. 

♦Sundays excepted. JSundays only. 

A few Changes have also been made in the Time-tables 
of the South Pacific Coast K. E. to and from Oakland and 
Alameda. Boats and trains now leave as follows : 

To Oakland and Alameda-*6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 
10:30,11:30 a.m.; 112:30,1:30,2:30,3:30,4:30,5:30,6:30, 

7:30,10:30, 11:35 p. m. 

From Fourteenth and Webster, Oakland— 5:5^, 
♦6-57, 7:57, 8:52, 9:52, 10:52, Jll:52 A. M.; 12:52, 1:52, 
2:52, 3:52, 4:52, 5:52, 6:52, 10:52, 11:52 P.M. At 7:o2 
daily for Alameda: Sundays only to San Francisco. 



146 



GUroE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



From High Strrbt, Alameda— »5 : 45, *6 • 45 7 • 45 8 • 35 

oiiJS, 10:35, 11:35 p. M. 
♦Sundays excepted. iSaturdays and Sundays only. 

INVENTORS' INSTITUTE. 

The objects of the Institute are to sell and dispose of 
patent inventions of all kinds in this State and elsewhere 
either m town, county, manufacturing, or shop rights, or 
whole State rights, or the entire patent at one sale, or 
upon royalty, according to circumstances. The Institute 
obtains patents of the United States and foreign coun- 
tries on reasonable terms. Inventors and patentees 
would do well to communicate with the Institute, if they 
wish to dispose of their inventions or to obtain patents 
therefor. Exhibition rooms connected with the Insti- 
tute contain models of inventions, many of them in work- 
ing operation. The public are cordially invited to visit 
the Institute, at 321 California Street. See advertisement 
on back of map. 

TO TOURISTS. 

For tickets to Yosemite, Calaveras and Mariposa Big 
Trees, Lake Tahoe, Geysers, and Lakeport, 
Apply to Sam Miller, 

2 New Montgomery Street. 
All Yosemite tickets good for the entire season, and 
over either Madera or Milton route at passenger's option. 



PURCHASEES' GUIDE. 



Containing tlie names and location of prominent and 
reliable Mercantile Firms, Manufacturers, etc., in the 
city of San Francisco. 

APOTHECARIES. 

G. G, Burnett, 327 Montgomery. 

Dr. Justin Gates, 722 Montgomery. 

J. W. Rule, North-west corner Howard and Third. 

H. B. Slaven, North-east corner Market and Powell. 

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS. 
Menzo Spring, 9 Geary (see advertisement). 

ASSAYERS. 
C. A. Luckhardt & Co., 23 Stevenson. 

BARBERS. 

A. C. Cordan, 210 Drumm. 
L. Corriveau, 113 Geary. 

BATHS. 

L Corriveau, 113 Geary (see advertisement). 

C. E. DriscoU (salt water), 2210 and 2212 Powell (see ad- 
vertisement). , 

Dr. Justin Gates (Turkish and Russian Steam), 7JJ 
Montgomery (see advertisement). 

San Francisco Swimming Baths, Bay between Pow- 
ell and Mason (see advertisement). 



148 



GUIDE TO SAN FEANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



BED COMFORTERS. 
F. F. Du Rose, 29 Second. 



California Bed Comforter Factory! 



SECOND STREET, a few doors from Market 
SAN FRAIVCISCO. 

A Superior Quality of all Sizes filled with Cotton Batting constantly 

on hand. 

NO SHODDY USED. 



BEEHIVE MANUFACTURERS. 
George M. Wetherbee, 73i Bryant. 

BOOKBINDERS. 
D. Hicks & Co., 508 Montgomery (see advertisement). 

BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS. 
John Utschig (custom made), 326 Bush. 

BRASS-WORKS. 
"Weed & Kingwell, 125 First. 



■^California Brass Works,-^ 

Wo. 1«5 First Street, San Francisco. 

xfotfi"^^^';-"'"^" RC^" ^'^^^ of Erass, Composition, Zinc and Babbit 
Metal Castinp Church and Steamboat Belli. Also a full ^sortmont 
i/J^^n™ ^i"*^ ^^*^'" Cocks and Valves, Hvdrauiic Pipes vSsan,1 
Hose Couplings, etc. Brass Ship Work, Spikes, sLat&NaUsRud 
der Braces, etc. Agents for Sieberf s Eure ka Lubricltor * ' 

BREWERIES. 

Washington, Claus Wreden & Co., South-east corner 
Taylor and Lombard. 



GUIDE TO SAX FRANCISCO AJND VICINITY. 149 



BROKERS. 
Ferdinand Smith, 316 Montgomery. 

BRUSHES AND BROOMS. 
O. E. Kunze, 646 Mission (see advertisement). 

BUSINESS AGENCIES. 
California Business Agency, 611 Clay. 

CALIFORNIA CHAMPAGNE. 
A. Finke's "Widow, 809 Montgomery (see advertise- 
ment). 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT SALT. 
H. B. Slaven, North-east corner Market and Powell (see 
advertisement), 

CALIFORNIA WINT:S AND BRANDIES. 
J. Gundlach & Co., South-east corner Market and Sec- 
ond (see advertisement). 
Kohler Sc Frohling, 626 Montgomery. 
Putzman & Dunker, 340 Pine. 

CARPETS AND OIL-CLOTHS. 
Burnham, Beck & Co., 618 Market and 15 and 17 Post. 
William McPhun (Successor to Hartshorn & McPhun), 
861 Market. 

CARRIAGE AND CAB CO^NIPANIES. 
Telephone Cab and Carriage Co., Stables 1324 and 

1326 Market, Stands junction Geary and Market and 5 

Kearny (see advertisement). 
United Carriage Co., 2 New Montgomery. 

CARRIAGE ANT) TVAGON MATERIALS. 
"Waterhouse & Lester, 16-22 Beale. 



150 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 

CHIMNEY TOPS. 
J. B. Williams, 945 and 947 Market. 

CHINESE AND JAPANESE GOODS. 
Fong Sang Lung & Co., 621 Dupont. 
Sun Kam Wah & Co., 714i^ Dupont. 

FONG SANG LUNG & CO. 

Direct Importers and 
■Wholesale and Eetail Dealers in 

CHINESE AND JAPANESE FANCY GOODS 

CHEAPJEST PJLACE IN XH£ CITY. 

mmi. ntriposf^ street. 



SUK KAM WA3B <& GO. 

Established 13 years. 
Importers of and Dealers in 




Etc., Etc. 

No. 7U}4 Dupont Street, comer of Commercial, San Francisco. 

p. O. Box 1994. 



CIGAR MANUFACTURERS. 
Curtis, Dixon & Co., 309 Clay. 
Jose A. Garcia, 413 Sacramento (see advertisement). 
Michalitschke Bros. & Co., 201 California and 239 

Kearny. 
J. W. Shaeffer & Co., 321 Sacramento (see advertise- 
ment). 

COAL. 

John McKew, 431 Union. 

COFFEE SALOONS. 
F. I. Cutter, 134 Eddy. 
Wilhelm Nielsen, 223 Montgomery Avenue. 



GUIDK TO SAN FBANCISCO AND VICINITY. 151 

COLLEGES. 
Pacific Business College, 320 Post (see advertisement). 

COPPERSMITHS. 
P. Perey, 233 First (see advertisement). 

COESETS. 
M. Freud & Sons, 742 Market and 10 Dupont. 

CUTLERY. 
M. Price, 415 Kearny. 

First Premium and Medal of Mechanics' Institute, 1871. First Premium 
and Medal of Mechanics' Institute, 1869. First Premium and Medal of 
Mechanics' Institute, 1868. First Premium of Mechanics' Institute, 1865. 
First Premium of Mechanics' Institute, 1864. First Premimm of Mechan- 
ics' Institute, 1860. First Premium of the Bay District Society, 1860. 
First Premium in New Orleans, 1870. 

To M. PKICE, For 

415 KEA^KXY ST.," bet. Pine and California, San Francisco. 

J^^Razors, Knives, Shears, etc., made to order and warranted. 
Country orders promptly attended to. 

DENTISTS. 

Charles E. Blake, Sr., 920 Market (see advertisement). 

Colton Dental Association, Phelan's Building, 806 
Market (see advertisement). 

"W. F. Gris'wold, Phelan's Building, 806 Market (see ad- 
vertisement). 

Thomas Morffe-w, 8 Montgomery. 

George M. Saul, 14 Dupont. 

DIAMONDS. 

Louis Braverman & Co., 119 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 

John Levy & Co., 118 Sutter (see advertisement). 

George C. Shreve & Co., 110 Montgomery (see ad- 
vertisement). 



152 GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



DIE SINKERS. 
C. L.Giller, 402 Montgomery (see advertisement). 

DRAIN TILE. 
Gladding, McBean & Co., 1310-1316 Market. 

EASTERN RAILROAD AGENTS. 
H. B. Smith, Jr., 116 Montgomery. 

ELECTRICAL APPARATUS MANUFACTURERS. 
California Electrical Works, 35 Market. 

ENGRAVERS. 
W. E. Goldsmith & Son (card and seal), 26 Montgom- 
ery (see advertisement). 
C. L. Giller (seal), 402 Montgomery (see advertisement). 
H. Oliver & Co. (wood), 535 Clay. 

FANCY CABINET WOODS AND VENEERS. 
John Wigmore, 129-147 Spear and 28 Howard. 

FANCY GOODS. 
F. L. M. Peters & Co., 207 Montgomery. 

FANCY VASES AND FLOWER POTS. 
J. B. Williams, 945 and 947 Market. 

FEATHER DUSTERS. 
O. E. Kunze, &46 Mission (see advertisement). 

FIRE-BRICK, TILE, AND CLAY. 
Gladding, McBean & Co., 1310-1316 Market. 

FLAG MANUFACTURERS. 
Norcross & Co., 6 Post (see advertisement). 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 15J 

FURNISHING GOODS-MEN'S. 
John "W. Carmany, 25 Kearny, 
S. Irving &. Co., 206 Kearny. 

Lindacher & Stadtfeld, 34 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 



206 Kearn^^ Street, 
Visitors to the city will find at this establish- 
ment an extensive and varied assortment of 
Gents' Underwear, Silk and Cambric Handker- 
chiefs, Neckties, Gloves, Dusters, Etc., at the 
Lowest Market Prices. 

SHIRTS MAD£ TO ORD£R. 

FURNITURE. 

Burnham, Beck & Co., 618 Market and 15 and 17 Post. 
A. F. Knorp, 411 and 413 Mission (see advertisement). 

GAS FIXTURES. 
David Bush, 22 Post. 

GOLD-PLATERS. 
R. Sohaezlein, 13-19 Trinity (see advertisement). 
"W. E. Shepman, 103 Geary. 

GROCERIES AND LIQUORS. 
Hildebrandt 8c Knop, South-east corner Montgomery 

and Broadway. 
Lebenbaum, Goldberg & Bowen (Importers of 

Choice Groceries, Wines, Cognac, etc.), 430 and 432 Pine. 
W. H. Miller, 316 Green. 
Daniel, J. Mooney, South-west corner Point Lohos and 

First Avenues. 
Peter Pettenati, 1028 Kearny. 



154 aUlDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 



Schottler & Sullivan, North-east corner Montgomery 

and Vallejo. 
R. Schottler, North-east corner Montgomery and 

Broadway. 

HARDWOOD LUMBER. 
Jolin "Wigmore, 129-147 Spear and 28 Howard. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 
C. L. Haskell, 10 Bush. 
I J. C. Johnson & Co., 12 and 14 Pine. 

j HATTERS. 

I Collins & Co., 512 Montgomery. 
i C. Herrmann & Co., 336 Kearny. 



C. HERRM:A:N^]Sr & CO. 

(Herrmann, the Datter.) 

Importers and Manufacturers of 

FINE HATS AND CAPS 

And Dealers in Hat Materials. 

336 KEARNY STREET, between Bush and Pine, 

Factory, \7 Belden Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
liASeE STOCK, FIBTE OOOOS and T^OIF PKICFS 

HOMEOPATHIC PHARMACY. 
Boericke & Schreck (Pioneer Pharmacy), 234 Sutter. 

HOTELS. 

Ahlborn House, 321 Dupont. 

Baldwin Hotel, North-east corner Market and Powell. 

Brooklyn Hotel, 210 Bush. 

Brown's Hotel, 810-814 Battery. 

Central Hotel, 217 Broadway. 

Cliff House, Termination Point Lobos Avenue (see ad- 
vertisement). 

Commercial Hotel, South-east corner Montgomery Av- 
enue and Kearny. 



GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VldNITY. 155 



Golden Eagle Hotel, North-west corner Montgomery 
and Broadway. 

Grand Hotel, South-east corner Market and New Mont- 
gomery. 

Hackmeier's Hotel, 512 Bush. 

International Hotel, 824 Kearny. 

Jackson's Hotel, 816 Sansome. 

Lick House, South-west corner Montgomery and Sutter. 

New Atlantic Hotel, 207 Montgomery Avenue. 

Occidental Hotel, Montgomery between Bush and Sut- 
ter. 

Palace Hotel, South-west corner Market and New 
Montgomery. 

Prescott House, South-west corner Kearny and Mont- 
gomery Avenue. 

Russ House, Montgomery between Bush and Pine. 

Western Hotel, 212 and 214 Broadway. 

Galindo Hotel, South-west corner Eighth and Franklin, 
Oakland. 

Tubbs' Hotel, East Central Avenue between Fourth and 
Fifth Avenues, Oakland (see advertisement). 

HOTEL REGISTERS. 
Pacific Coast Hotel Register Co., 508 Montgomery 
(see advertisement). 

HOUSE, SIGN, AND FRESCO PAINTERS. 

E. M. Gallagher, 611 Sacramento. 

IRON-WORKS. 

^tna Iron-Works Co., 217-221 Fremont (see advertise- 
ment). 

Fulton Iron-Works, 220 Fremont. 

Globe Iron- Works Co., 222 and 224 Fremont. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron- Works, 237-251 First 
(see advertisement). 

Occidental Iron-Works, 137 First (see advertisement). 

Pacific Iron- Works, 127 First. 



156 GUIDK TO 8AK FBANCISCO AKD VICtNITT. 

JEWELRY. 

Louis Braverman & Co., 119 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 

John Levy &. Co., 118 Sutter (see advertisement). 

"W. Manning, 804 Market. 

George C. Shreve & Co., 110 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 

LIQUORS. 

Jules Berthier, 1318 Market. 

Brown & Perkins, South-east corner Montgomery and 
Washington. 

J. Gundlach & Co., South-east corner Market and Sec- 
ond (see advertisement). 

John Harrison, 138 Montgomery Avenue. 

A. P. Hotaling &. Co. (importers and sole agents J. H. 
Cutter whisky), 429-437 Jackson (see advertisement). 

H. H. Kock, 15 Leidesdorff. 

Putzman & Dunker, 340 Pine. 

Louis Sohultze, South-east cor. Sansome and Lombard. 

Adam Smith (City Bank Exchange), 633 Sacramento. 

George Stevens, importer and sole agent White House 
Bourbon Whisky, 318 Front. 

ADAM SMITHp 

633 Sacramento Street, between Montgomery and Eeamy. 

At this EiUbllihinent will be found the CholcMt Brmnds of 
Native and Imported 

WINES, LIQUORS, etc., and CIGARS 

OF TKE BEST QUALITY. 
Strangers In the city are in>ited to call and judge for themielve*. 

LIVERY STABLES. 
P. L. Archibald &. Co., 1129 Market (see advertisement). 
McCord &. Scott, 221 Ellis (see advertisement). 
John Nolan, 1611 and 1613 California. 



OUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 157 

LODGE FURNITURE. 
A. F. Knorp, 411 and 413 Mission (see advertisement). 

LODGE SUPPLIES. 
Norcross 65: Co., 6 Post (see advertisement). 

MACHINISTS. 

^tna Iron-Works Co., 217-221 Fremont (see advertise- 
ment). 

Pulton Iron-Works, 220 Fremont. 

Globe Iron-Works Co., 222 and 224 Fremont. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron- Works, 237-251 First 
(see advertisement). 

Tlieodore Kallenberg, 32 Fremont. 

Occidental Iron- Works, 137 First (see advertisement). 

Pacific Iron-Works, 127 First. 

MARKETS. 
G. Cuneo, 309 and 311 Broadway. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 

Joseph Pigel, 211 Montgomery. 

Henry Planz, 525 Geary (see advertisement). 

MILITARY GOODS. 
Norcross & Co., 6 Post (see advertisement). 

MINING AND [MECHANICAL ENGINEERS. 
Adams & Carter, 109 California (see advertisement). 

MODEL MAKERS. 
Ii. Peterson, 258 Market (see advertisement). 

MUSICAL BOXES. 
A. E. Juillerat (sole agent for M. J. Paillard & Co.), 23 
Dupont (see advertisement). 



158 OUIDB TO SAN FBAWCISCO AKD VICINIXr. 

NICKEI^PLATERS. 
"W. B. Shepman, 103 Geary. 

OPTICAL GOODS. 
F. L. M. Peters & Co., 207 Montgomery. 

ORE CONCENTRATORS. 
Adams & Carter, 109 California (see advertisement). 

ORNAMENTAL GLASS. 
S. E. Hopper, 39^^ Fremont. 

PATENT CHIMNEYS AND TOPS. 
J. Browell, 727 Montgomery. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 
T. A. Brown, 606 Kearny. 
New York Gallery, 25 Third. 

C. E. "Watkins' Yosemite Art Gallery, 427 Montgomery 
(see advertisement). 



FOR TH£ BEST 



TIN TYPES OR PHOTOGRAPHS 

And the Finest Medallion Portraits 

—GO TO— 

606 Kearny Street, corner Sacramento. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS. 
C. E. Watkins' Yosemite Art Gallery, 427 Montgomery 

(see advertisement). 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 
A. M. Benham, 735 Market. 
Matthias Gray, 206 Post. 



aniDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY. 159 



KoMer &. Chase, 137 and 139 Post. 
Woodworth, Schell & Co., 105 Stockton. 

PRINTERS— BOOK AND JOB. 
Bacon & Company, 508 Clay (see advertisement). 

QUARTZ JEWELRY. 
Louis Braverman & Co., 119 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 
John Levy & Co., 118 Sutter (see advertisement), 
George C. Shreve & Co., 110 Montgomery (aee adver- 
tisement). 

REGALIA. 

Norcross & Co., 6 Post (see advertisement). 

RESTAURANTS. 

Bird's Quaker Dairy, 33 Post. 

G. "W. Hildreth, Quaker Dairy, 10 Montgomery (see ad- 
vertisement). 
E. B. Thomas, 1007 Market. 

RUBBER GOODS. 
Goodyear Rubber Co., 577 Market. 

RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCIL PLATES. 
A. D. Oakley, 712 Montgomery. 

SAW MANUTACTURERS. 
Pacific Saw Manufacturing Co., 17 and 19 Fremont 
(see advertisement). 

SCROLL SALVING. 
A. F. Knorp, 411 and 413 Mission (see advertisement). 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS. 
George Mearns, 425 Montgomery. 
F. A. Rouleau, 328 Montgomery, Room No. 1 (see adver- 
tisement). 



160 GUIDE TO SAN FRAKCISCO AND TICINITY. 



SEWER PIPE. 
Gladding, McBean & Co., 1310-1316 Market. 
J. B. Williams, 945 and 947 Market. 

SEWING MACHINES. 
Samuel Hill, 634 Market (see advertisement). 

SHIP TIMBER AND LOCUST TREENAILS. 
Jolin Wigmore, 127-147 Spear and 28 Howard. 

SHIRTS. 
S. Irving & Co., 206 Kearny. 

Lindacher & Stadtfeld, 34 Montgomery (see advertise- 
ment). 

SHOW CASES. 

Dixon, Bernstein & Co., 252 Market (see advertise- 
ment). 

SIGN PAINTERS. 

Frederick Mansell, 434 Pine. 

SILVER-PLATERS. 
John Martell, 623 Sacramento. 
R. Schaezlein, 13-19 Trinity (see advertisement). 
W. E. Shepman, 103 Geary. 



SILVER PLATED COPPER PLATES 

— FOB— 

MIBTEBS ABTO QITARTZ MII.I.8, 

Famished to order in any quantity and size at Lowest possible Rate* 
and Silver Plating guaranteed at 

Pacific Gold, Silver and Nickel Plating Works, 

108 GEARY STREET, S. W. corner Dupont, S. F. 
1^. K. SHEPMAir, Proprietor. 

>yTabI« Ware »nd all kinds of Work Re-plated and Repaired. 



SILVERWARE. 

Louis Braverman & Co., 119 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 



aUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 161 



John Levy & Co., 118 Sutter (see advertisement). 
George C. Shreve & Co., 110 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 

SILVERSMITHS. 

R. SchaeElein, 13-19 Trinity (see advertisement). 

SOCIETY BADGES. 
R. Schaezlein, 13-19 Trinity (see advertisement). 

SOCIETY GOODS. 
Norcross & Co., 6 Post (see advertisement). 

STAIR BUILDERS. 
N. P. Langland, 407 Mission. 

STATIONERS. 
Dutton & Partridge, 306 California. 

STEERING WHEELS. 
Robert Bragg, 322 Main (see advertisement). 

STONEWARE. 
J. B. WilUams, 945 and 947 Market. 

TAILORS' GOODS AND TRIMMINGS. 
Stein, Simon 65: Co., South-east corner Market and Sec- 
ond. 

TERRA-COTTA CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS, 
VASES, ETC. 
Gladding, McBean & Co., 1310-1316 Market. 

TOURIST AND TICKET AGENT. 
Sam Miller, 2 New Montgomery. 

TOYS. 
F. L. M. Peters & Co., 207 Montgomery. 



162 aUIDB TO SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITT. 



WATCHES AND CLOCKS. 
Louis Braverman & Co., 119 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 
John Levy & Co., 118 Sutter (see advertisement). 
George C. Shreve & Co., 110 Montgomery (see adver- 
tisement). 

WATER-PIPE. 
Gladding, McBean & Co., 1310-1316 Market. 

WINDMILLS. 
P. W. Krogh & Co., 51 Beale. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Street Dir ectory a nd Guide. 

All visitors to the city should procure a copy 
of this valuable pocket companion. By Its aid 
they can find any street, op number on any street, 
as readily as one who has resided in San Fran- 
cisco fop yeaps. 

FOR SALE AT THE PRINCIPAL BOOK STORES. 
ASK FOR DISTURNELL'S STREET GUIDE. 




OAKLAND, CAL. 

This large and commodious Hotel is sitaated in the near vicinity 
of Clinton Station, where trains pass to and from San Francisco 
every half hour. 

The Hotel is surrounded by large and beautiful grounds enclosing 
an entire block, and ornamented with lawns and beauUful flowers. 

JAMES F. MORRIS, Proprietor. 



JNO. LEVY & CO. 

MAKERS AND DIPOETEES 01 

FINE JEWELRY, 
DIAMONDS, 

PRECIOUS STONES, 
WATCHES, 

SILVERWARE 

Carriage | Wantel Clocks 

FANS AND 

OPERA GLASSES 



Manufacturing of Quarts Jewelry 
a Specialty » 



118 Sutter Street, 

SAN PEANOISOO, OAL. 



DIXON, BERNSTEIN k CO. 



Manufacturers of 




SHOIKT CASSS 

Corner Market and Front Streets, 

8A» FBAKCISCO, CAL. 
Wi/-*u e^^^^^ FACTOKT : BRAKCH FACTORY: 

riftli Street, near Bryant Street, Corner Front and Stark Streeta. 

San Francisco, Cal. Portland, Or. 



CHAS. B. STBIGIB. j^g. ^^ ^ERR. 

OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY. 



STEIGER & KERR, 

OFFICE, 137 FIRST STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



CHILLED CAR WHEELS AND OTHER 
IRON CASTINGS 



OF ALL DESCmPTIOyS. 



J. W. SHAEFFER & CO. 



Manufacturers of the 



And other Fine Brands of 



HAVANA CIGARS 



Sacramento Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



/Etna Iron Works Co. 



JLANUFACTUEEBS OF 



ZROIT CASTZITGS 

AND 

MACHINERY 

OF ALL KINDS, 

217, 219 and 221 Fremont Street, 

Between Howard and Folsom, 



GEO, JOHNSON, - MANAGEB. 



HOT AND COLD 

MLWAim BATHS 

From Ocean "Water, from Outside Sea- Wall, 

through 1510 feet of pipe 

AND STEAM BATHS 

With Hot and Cold Saltwater Showers. 



SANITARIUM 

Ladies' Entrance, 2210, Gentlemen's, 2212 Powell St. 

Near Bay Street, North Beach, San Francisco. 

BATHS, 25 CTS. 5 TICKETS, SI. 00 

C. E. DRISCOLL, Proprietor. 

RECORD 

LIVERY STABLE 

Removed to 

1129 Market St. 

SOUTH SIDE, 

Bet. 7th and 8th, 

San Francisco. 
Open Day and Night. 

J^^Fast and Stylish 
TEAMS and HORSES 
at short notice. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO THE 

BOARDING AND SALE OF HORSES 

p. L. ARCHIBALD & CO. 





iFinke'sWidoi 

Manufacturer of 

CALIFORNIA 

Ctaimiape 

Montgomery St. 

Bet. Jackson and Pacific, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



OTTO E. KTTSTZB, 

PROPRIETOR OF THE 

0. K. BROSH FACTORY, 

Manufacturer and Importer of 

BrMes, Broois, aid Featlier Dusters ol Every Descrlptiofl, 

646 MISSION STREET, 

Bfltweea TWrd wd New Montgomorj, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Formerly »60 Tbird Street. 



411 & 418 Mission St., HechaDics' Mill, near Fremont, 2d Floor 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MA1VUFACTI7BES TO OBDEK 

D@§ks, Book-Oa3@3, Counters, 

CABINETS, MANTELS, 

And Every Description of Interior Finish for OflBces, Stores, Banki, 
Saloons, Sailing and Steam Vessels, Private Residences and Lodge 
Furniture, in any Style desired, and at Reasonable Rates. 

a^Al.1. ^WOBK OUAltAlgTEEP. _ Je% 

Band and Scroll Sawing, Shaping, Turning, Etc. BTac^^^*> 

Mouldings and House Finishing, Special Attention 

given to the putting up of Machinery. 

Sole Manufacturer of A. T. ZNOSP'S PATENT SODA BOTTLE CA3BIIB. 

JOS£ A. GARCIA, 

IMPORTER OF 

Fine Havana Lsaf Tobacco 

C^^~^ AND ^^T;i5 

MANUFACTURER OF CIGARS, 

413 Sacramento St., bet. Battery and Sansome, SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 

A Large Assortment of Clear Havana Cigars Always on Hand. 




FOS THE BEST IUFS07ED 

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS 

ADDRESS 

MENZO SPRING. 

$1 9 Geary St. | 

C|SAN FRANCISCO, Cai. | 



W. E. GOLDSMITH & SON, 

PRACTICAL 

CARD AND SEAL ENGRAYERS 

MONOGRAMS, DIES, ARMS, CRESTS, ETC. 
Redding, Reception and ^i^ltlng ^ard6 



EJIVOIiAVED, ^ 



Rotary Public, Commissioners', and Society Seals. 

26 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

KOB'T BRAGG, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

iTllEIW^ WMlELi 




322 MAIN STREET, 

BsTWBKN FoLSOM AND Harrison, SAN FRANCISCO. 



McCORD & SCOTT, 



FASHION 




STABLES 



— w*-^^^ 



J3S1 ELIjIS STPIEET. 



A Choice Line of Liver7 Horses and Vehicles of every variety. 

Saddle Horses a Specialty. Careful and Experienced 

Drivers furnished for the use of 

TOURISTS AND PRIVATE PARTIES. 

0»DEKS can be left with United Cakeiagk Co's Agent at the fol- 
fowing places : No. 2 New Montgomert Sfkeet. Palace, Grand, Lick, 
Occidental and Baldwin Hotels, or sent by Telephone to Stable. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Siariniining Batlis 

BAY STREET, 

BETWEEN I>OTVEIjILi"A.3SrX) "NLASON, 



» I 05 

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TRUWORTHY <fe BANE, 



PROPRIETORS. 



! 



Roaring Ocean! Surging Breakers! Foaming 
Surf! Monster Sea Lions! 



Appetizing Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, and Suppers I 

'Wines in 'Variety, Finest Grade*. 

All the Finest Brands of California Wines. 



Omnibusses connect with the Geary and Market Street, and Point 
Lobos Avenue Eailroads, taking you direct to " The Cliff." 

J. G. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



Dr. Chas. E. Blake, Sr. 

P 

Bas BemoTed to his Fine Parlors at 

920 MARKET ST., NEAR THE BALDWIN, 

»AIS FBJlIVCISCO. 



In consequence of change of times and contraction of the incomes 
of his old patrons. Dr. Blake's prices are much less than formerly, 
and within reach of all who desire the care and experience of 
one who has had thirty-two years' practice in the State, and twenty- 
seven years in this city, and always been distinguished as being one 
at the head of his profession for introducing many of the latest im- 
provements and inventions now used by the leading dentists. 



COLTOIT DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

PHELAN'S BUILDING, 
Parlors O, 7, 8, 9, lO, 11, (Entrance, 806 Market,) 

W CAS SPECIALISTS ! °« 

POSITIVELY Extract Teeth Without Pain! 

The only oflBce that makes and gives the Celebrated " Coltoh Gjls." 

Established 1863. 10,000 references. 

ALSO, PEEFOEMS ALL OPEEATIONS IN DENTISTEY. 

1»B.. CHA.Br.ES ^W. 1>£CK£B, Dentist. 

D. SZCZS A CO. 

BOOK BINDERS, 

AND 

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS. 

Fine Antique and Tree Oalf Bindings. 



PACIFIC COAST HOTEL REGISTER CO. 

Z>. HICKS <£• CO., ratentees. 

508 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

San Fbancisco, Cal. 




liarsest and lHost ConTenient in San FrancUco. 

113 GEARY STREET, BET. DUPONT AND STOCKTON, 

T.. CORRIVEA.!:, Proprietor. 



For Itadies and Gentlemen, 

No. 10 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Opposite Lick House, SAK FRANCISCO. 



G. "W. HILDRETH, Prop»r. 









DIE SINKER, 

402 Montgomery St., Room 32 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



The Most Superior Work on the Pacific Coast. 

RULE'S RADICAL CURE I 

AN rwT AT.T.rR T.F. REMEDY FOB 

Gonghs, Colds, Asthma, Maenza, Hoarseness, Bronchitis. 

AND RELIEF FOR 

Consmnption in Advanced Stages of the Disease. 

It never fails to cure, and relief is experienced from tbe first dose. 
Price, »5 Cents, 50 Cents, and $1.00 per Bottle. 

PREPARED BY 

J. "W. RUIiE, Druggist and Apothecary, 

N. W. corner Third and Howard Streets. 



"W. F. GB.lS"W01iD, 

DENTIST, 

Phelan's Bailding, Boomfi 30 and 3S. 

iiwiwe MACHwie 

General Agency for the 

White, New Home, Crown, Wilson, Florence, 
Victor, Weed, 

AND OTHER LEADING KINDS. 



C. Howard & Co'a Needles for all Machines. 

Genuine Farts, Attachments, Oil, etc. 

Terma Illiberal. Exclasive Territory to Dealers. 



Also, DEMOEEST'S CUT PATTERNS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Send for Circulars and Price Lists to 

SAMUEL HILL, General Dealer, 

Opposite Palace Hotel, 684 Market St., San Francisco. 

F. A. ROULEAU, 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS 

For the City and County of San Francisco, 

OFFICE, 328 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Safe Deposit Baildlns, Room 9*0. 1. 



\>. 



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2U£ 



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